Undergraduate Catalog

Overseas and Off-Campus Programs

Director: Blythe Knott
Assistant Director: Nicole Schneider

As a liberal arts college committed to international education, Lewis & Clark offers an extensive program of overseas and off-campus study opportunities. Each year roughly 300 students participate in more than 30 programs, either abroad or in selected areas of the United States. Over half of the students who graduate from Lewis & Clark will have spent at least one semester studying overseas or at a domestic off-campus location.

Overseas and Off-Campus Programs form an integral part of the total educational experience at Lewis & Clark, supporting and enhancing on-campus curricula. Through immersion in foreign or domestic cultures, students learn firsthand about the history, culture, and contemporary issues of the area. They also gain insights into their own culture by comparing and contrasting American institutions and values to those of the host country. Recognizing the significant educational value of study in another culture, Lewis & Clark includes international studies in its General Education requirements for graduation. Most overseas programs offer courses that fulfill that requirement.

Faculty broaden their historical, cultural, and linguistic knowledge of the world by leading overseas and off-campus programs. Many of Lewis & Clark's present faculty have led programs, which have taken place in 66 countries.

Students should start planning for overseas or off-campus study early in their college careers. Faculty and academic advisors are prepared to assist students in integrating overseas study with majors or General Education requirements. Program information and applications are available on the Overseas and Off-Campus Programs website.

Please note: Students may not receive transfer credit for an overseas program not sponsored by Lewis & Clark that occurs at the same place and time as a Lewis & Clark overseas program.

Eligibility

All students in good academic standing and without pending disciplinary sanctions are eligible to apply for an overseas or off-campus program. Enrollment in an overseas or off-campus program is by selective admission. Acceptance into the program is determined by examination of academic preparation and a personal interview. In order to participate in the program, a student must remain in good academic standing during the period between acceptance and program departure. Students on academic probation or on disciplinary warning or probation may apply for participation but must be in good academic standing and off disciplinary probation or warning by the end of the semester preceding program departure. Students are advised that some programs have specific prerequisites and a higher minimum GPA for eligibility. Students are not allowed to participate in an overseas or off-campus program until they have completed the core requirement: Exploration and Discovery.

Credit

Students on all programs will earn credit based on Lewis & Clark Curriculum Committee program approval. Awarded credit may vary based on courses taken. Students are not allowed to exceed a normal course load of 19 credits, and partial course credit will not transfer. In some cultural programs, credit awarded is limited to the pre-approved courses. Since curricular offerings vary with the program location and academic focus, students should consider their need to fulfill major or General Education requirements in close consultation with their academic/major advisor before applying to an off-campus program. An internship or independent study is available in the same semester as an overseas or off-campus program only when the internship or independent study is part of the program curriculum approved in advance by the curriculum committee.

Program Fee

Students participating in off-campus study programs are charged Lewis & Clark tuition, full Lewis & Clark room and board, plus an administrative fee of $750. Not included in the fee are books, inoculations, passports, visas, and incidental expenses. Round-trip travel is not included. Financial aid and Federal Direct Loans may be applied. Please refer to Overseas and Off-Campus Program Fee in Costs for program fees. Additional information may be found on the Overseas and Off-Campus Programs Cost webpage.

Application and Selection

Students apply to overseas programs by completing an application, which includes information regarding academic preparation, program objectives, essays, release and agreement forms, and academic references. Applicants are interviewed by the program leader or advisor. Final decisions regarding selection are made by the Office of Overseas and Off-Campus Programs.

Normally students apply one year in advance. The application deadline for fall semester and summer programs is late October of the academic year preceding the program. The application deadline for spring semester programs is in late February of the academic year preceding the program.

Program Payment Schedule

A $300 nonrefundable deposit must be made within 30 days of acceptance to a program. The remainder of the fee is paid on a per-semester basis according to regular on-campus billing periods and procedures.

Withdrawal of Participant

Students who withdraw from an overseas or off-campus program three months or more before group departure forfeit the nonrefundable program deposit of $300. Students who withdraw less than three months before departure are charged a $3,000 fee. In the event a student voluntarily withdraws from an overseas or off-campus program after departure for the program site, the following fees and charges will apply:

  • If the withdrawal takes place within the first month of the program, the participant will be responsible for 50 percent of the comprehensive fee.

  • If the withdrawal takes place after the first month of the program, the participant will be responsible for 100 percent of the comprehensive fee.

Lewis & Clark reserves the right to add any fees incurred by the participant to the participant's account, and to refuse registration, provision of transcripts, and issuance of degrees until all fees are paid in full. Please refer to the Overseas and Off-Campus Programs Release and Agreement for complete details of the policies in force once a student has been accepted to an overseas or off-campus program.

Types of Programs

Overseas and off-campus programs vary considerably in form and content. However, the majority involve language study, academic coursework, field projects, excursions, and a period of residence with host-country families. Most programs include an intensive orientation prior to departure, and in all cases returning students are expected to share their experiences with Lewis & Clark and the Portland community.

All Lewis & Clark overseas and off-campus programs belong to one of these three categories:

General Culture Programs

General culture programs immerse students in a foreign culture to enable them to learn as much as possible about the area, its history and contemporary issues. At least six such semester programs, focusing on specific areas or cultures, are offered each year in Latin America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Please note that although the primary focus is on the host culture, some programs also have a significant language component. Please visit Overseas and Off-Campus Programs for details.

Since many programs are repeated annually or biennially, students may choose from a variety of programs during their four years at Lewis & Clark. Specific sites include Australia, China, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, East Africa (Kenya and Tanzania), Ecuador, England, France, Germany, Greece, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Russia, South Korea, Spain, and Vietnam.

Language-Intensive and Departmental Programs

These programs are open to students who meet departmental prerequisites and who are affiliated with the sponsoring department or discipline. Ongoing programs are offered in Australia and East Africa (biology); Chile, the Dominican Republic, and Spain (Spanish); France and Senegal (French); Germany (chemistry or German); England (fine arts/social sciences/psychology); Japan (Japanese); Russia (Russian); and China (Chinese). Additional programs are offered on request by academic departments.

Off-Campus Domestic Programs

Off-campus programs are offered in the Arizona borderlands, to study immigration issues and policy; in New York City, to study fine arts and theatre; and in Washington, D.C., to study the U.S. government and economy.

Scheduled Programs

As of publication time for this catalog, the following overseas and off-campus study programs are planned.

2017-18

Language-Intensive Programs

Chile: Santiago
Chile: Valparaíso
China: Beijing
Dominican Republic: Santo Domingo
France: Paris
France: Strasbourg
Germany: Munich (full year only)
Japan: Osaka at Kansai Gaidai University
Japan: Osaka at Osaka Gakuin University
Japan: Tokyo (full year only)
Russia: St. Petersburg
Russia: Vladivostok
Senegal: Dakar
Spain: Alicante

General Culture Programs, Fall Semester

China: Beijing
China: Chengdu
Dominican Republic: Santiago
East Africa: Kenya and Tanzania
England: London Humanities
Germany: Berlin
Greece: Regional Area Study
India: Regional Area Study
Japan: Sapporo
Russia: St. Petersburg
South Korea: Seoul

General Culture Programs, Spring Semester

Australia for Biology Majors
Dominican Republic: Santiago
Ecuador: Cuenca
England: London Music
Ireland: Dublin
Japan: Sapporo
New Zealand: Regional Area Study                                      
Russia: St. Petersburg
South Korea: Seoul

Domestic Programs, Fall Semester

Arizona: Border Studies
New York City: Art and Theatre

Domestic Programs, Spring Semester

Arizona: Border Studies

General Culture Programs, Summer

Australia: Psychology
Ecuador
Japan: Mt. Fuji Situated Environment

2018-19

Language-Intensive Programs

Chile: Santiago
Chile: Valparaíso
China: Beijing
Dominican Republic: Santo Domingo
France: Paris
France: Strasbourg
Germany: Munich (full year only)
Japan: Osaka at Kansai Gaidai University
Japan: Osaka at Osaka Gakuin University
Japan: Tokyo (full year only)
Russia: St. Petersburg
Russia: Vladivostok
Senegal: Dakar
Spain: Alicante

General Culture Programs, Fall Semester

China: Beijing
China: Chengdu
Dominican Republic: Santiago
East Africa: Kenya and Tanzania
England: London Humanities
Japan: Sapporo
Russia: St. Petersburg
South Korea: Seoul

General Culture Programs, Spring Semester

Australia: Regional Area Study
China: Beijing
Cuba: Havana
Dominican Republic: Santiago
Ecuador: Cuenca
Ireland (Dublin): Psychology
Italy: Siena
Japan: Sapporo
Morocco: Regional Area Study
Russia: St. Petersburg
South Korea: Seoul
Spain: Seville

Domestic Programs, Fall Semester

Arizona: Border Studies
Washington, D.C.: Political Science 

Domestic Programs, Spring Semester

Arizona: Border Studies

General Culture Programs, Summer

Ecuador
 

2019-20

Language-Intensive Programs

Chile: Santiago
Chile: Valparaíso
China: Beijing
Dominican Republic: Santo Domingo
France: Paris
France: Strasbourg
Germany: Munich (full year only)
Japan: Osaka at Kansai Gaidai University
Japan: Osaka at Osaka Gakuin University
Japan: Tokyo (full year only)
Russia: St. Petersburg
Russia: Vladivostok
Senegal: Dakar
Spain: Alicante

General Culture Programs, Fall Semester

China: Beijing
China: Chengdu
Dominican Republic: Santiago
East Africa (Kenya and Tanzania): Biology
England: London Humanities
Germany: Berlin
Greece: Regional Area Study
India: Regional Area Study
Japan: Sapporo
Russia: St. Petersburg
South Korea: Seoul

General Culture Programs, Spring Semester

Australia: Regional Area Study
Dominican Republic: Santiago
Ecuador: Cuenca
England (London): Music                                       
Russia: St. Petersburg
South Korea: Seoul
Spain: Seville

Domestic Programs, Fall Semester

Arizona: Border Studies
New York City: Art and Theatre

Domestic Programs, Spring Semester

Arizona: Border Studies

General Culture Programs, Summer

Australia: Psychology
Ecuador

Courses

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IS 210 Area Studies: East Africa History, Culture and Change

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: East Africa is a region of extraordinary ethnic, cultural, and biological diversity. This course begins with the earliest inhabitants and examines the movements and settlement patterns of various peoples of the region. Special attention is given to the impact of overseas influences during the last millennium, particularly those of the Arab-Muslim world during initial contact, and those of the Western-Christian world during the colonial period. The course also considers the rise of African nationalism, the end of colonial rule, and the ongoing effects of modernization and globalization in a developing country.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to East Africa overseas program.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 211 Contemporary East Africa

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: This course focuses on a wide variety of contemporary issues in East Africa, including population growth, health care, education, political structure and institutions, gender roles, land use, environmental health, geography, urbanization, art, and literature. As part of the coursework, students will complete an independent study project on a topic of their choice, which they will work on for the duration of the program. Both written and oral presentations will be made during the final week of the program.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to East Africa overseas program.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 215 Morocco: Development & Sustainability

Faculty: Bargach
Content: A journey through the multiple and overlapping realities of contemporary life in Southwest Morocco. Prosperity of its population and growth of its economy as the paradigms of modernity and bountiful natural resources are in crisis. Study of energy concerns, livelihood quests, individual community hopes and aspirations, the larger frame of what is identified as “progress,” and the role of development within such an endeavor.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Morocco program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 216 Moroccan Modernity

Faculty: Overseas Program Faculty
Content: This course explores Moroccan society, culture and politics in contemporary global context. Lectures, discussions, and field trips will be led by a variety of Moroccan experts, supplemented by regular discussions with program leader. Emphasis will be placed on Morocco’s vibrant participation in the dynamics of post-colonial state formation, modernization, and globalization—and the ambivalent effects of this participation. Also includes exploration of the literary, visual, and musical arts and the religious communities of modern Morocco. Students will be encouraged to connect classroom activities to their ongoing experiences of living in Morocco. Reading and writing assignments, journals, presentations, independent study projects, and field exercises are used to promote and test multifaceted approaches to learning.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance into Morocco Overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 217 Gender and Society in Morocco

Faculty: Overseas Program Faculty
Content: Examines the multifaceted relationships between women and men in Moroccan society. Beyond considering how gender formation and relations have been mediated by historically dynamic Islamic ideologies and institutions, the course attends to numerous other factors that have shaped gender identity, performance, and hierarchy. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which gender intersects with other structures of identity formation and social life, such as ethnicity, class, and religion. Topics include: doctrinal norms and lived realities, language and gender, models of masculinity, Moroccan feminism and women’s rights, gender and international migration.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance into Morocco Overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 220 Area Study: Senegal

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Includes extensive orientation activities; a series of organized visits to familiarize students with some of Dakar’s major organizations working in the fields of culture, development, women’s issues, and the environment; visits and excursions to important historical and cultural sites outside Dakar; and intensive French language instruction.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Senegal Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 221 Contemporary Senagalese Society

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Course includes three topics. Senegalese Arts and Society: Students learn about traditional and contemporary arts and explore how they are linked to their social and environmental context through traditional coursework and through excursions and hands-on workshops. Senegalese Literature: The Short Story: A study of diverse aspects of contemporary Senegalese society through the short story genre. Continuity and Change: Introduction to international and grassroots development activities through formal instruction and field study.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Senegal Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 222 History of Islam

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Presents the history of Islam in Senegal from the 10th through the 20th centuries, focusing on the beginnings of Islam in the Senegambia region, the slave trade and Islamization in the colonial and postcolonial era.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Senegal Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 230 Area Culture Studies: India

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Introduction to Indian culture, with focus on dynamic processes of family, neighborhoods and the city, education, socialization, gender, religions, work and leisure, environmental values, and the arts. Students will learn and apply techniques in ethnography, and interpretation through four analytical perspectives: cultural Marxism, developmental/modernization theory, cultural studies/deconstruction, and feminism. Combination of lectures, discussions, reading, interactive visits, and guided projects.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to India overseas program. Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an 'F'.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 231 Contemporary India

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: By examining the differences (both academic and experienced) between North India and South India, the course will illuminate the complex culture of India. Through lecture, field trips, writing and observation, students will focus on three basic themes: Chennai in the globalized world; religion; and art and culture.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to India overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 232 The Present In Delhi's Past

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Beginning with a history of Delhi, students will explore the complex organization of the Indian state, political opinions, gender, environment, labor and caste. Field trips to notable historical sites and classroom participation with Delhi University graduate students provide the opportunity to interact, create relationships and reflect on the cultural complexity.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to India overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 233 Development/Environment: India

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: This bridge course synthesizes knowledge and experiences gained on the program. Students will do independent research and complete a holistic project focusing on phenomenon common to the many program locations visited throughout India.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to India overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 245 Japanese Language Pledge and Cultural Immersion

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Students will improve oral proficiency and cultural immersion skills on the Osaka Gakuin CET overseas program by taking a modified language pledge and meeting with CET staff and Japanese roommates in cultural immersion activities.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Participation in Osaka Gakuin overseas program.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 1.

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IS 246 Japanese Cultural Immersion at Kansai Gaidai

Faculty: Overseas Program Faculty
Content: Required homestay experience that involves regular language activities and cultural events with family and Japanese instructors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance into Kansai Gaidai Overseas program.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 2.

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IS 249 Japan Past and Present

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Introduction to the political, economic, social, and cultural landscape of contemporary and historical Japan, with special reference to Mt. Fuji. Lectures, reading discussions, and field excursions will couple with historical and cultural training to provide a more in-depth understanding of the current situation.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Mt. Fuji Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, summer only.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 251 Contemporary England

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: This course attempts to come to terms with the legacy of Britain’s imperial past while simultaneously analyzing contemporary Britain in the light of the challenges that the country faces from a variety of political, economic and cultural sources. Key features for analysis will include Britain’s traditional political institutions and the process of reform; the importance of social class, race and ethnicity; and ‘popular culture’ vs. ‘high culture’. Ultimately, the course will provide students with a series of critical perspectives that will enable them to analyze, criticize, empathize and celebrate contemporary Britain.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to the London psychology overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 253 Social Welfare Issues in the United Kingdom

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: An introduction to social welfare issues in the UK that examines critical approaches to welfare; the history of welfare in the UK; social exclusion; education, and health; the social services; citizenship and how the global affects the local within the community. The course encourages critical discussion about the differences between US, the UK and the EU. The course aims to facilitate student orientation in the context of British society and workplace, and to offer an important socio-historical framework relevant to the other courses they will take.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to the London psychology overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 254 Diaspora Studies

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: An introduction to Multicultural Britain, its idealistic assumptions and its ground realities. An attempt will be made to trace and analyze the composition the composition of about 4 million non-white Britons from multi-ethnic backgrounds who have evolved from diasporas into multicultural ethnicities and transnational communities. As almost half of all of ethnic minority Britons live in London, the strobe will be on this “global city” where the new transnational dispersions of the global era have come to be identified as “global diasporas”. The study will include the Black community, Chinese and South Asians, the Jewish diaspora and Islam in the diaspora.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to the London psychology overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 256 Topics in Humanities: London

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Taught by the faculty leader of the London humanities overseas program, this course will focus on a humanities topic within the leader’s discipline. The course will make use of London-based resources and will incorporate site visits. Topics will vary by year within the humanities.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing and participation in the London Humanities Program.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 259 Contemporary Greek Culture

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Offered over the course of the semester in Athens and on Lesbos, this course provides insight into important contemporary social, cultural, political, economic, and demographic issues in Greece.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Greece overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 260 History of Modern Berlin: From 1815 to Present

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Provides a history of Berlin focusing on the period from 1815 to the present. Students will examine changes in the economic structure, social development and technical history of Berlin. Topics covered include Berlin as a cultural center in literature, the fine arts, cabaret, and theater, as well as urban planning and the division and unification of a modern city. Particular attention is paid to the periods of reunification and the postwar period.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Berlin overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 261 Contemporary Germany

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Introduction to a wide variety of contemporary issues in Germany, including the political system, gender roles, regional differences, issues with labor migration and naturalization, and culture. This part of the program will take advantage of the opportunities available in the Berlin area, such as the German capital complex, the large Turkish immigrant community, musical infrastructure (including three opera houses and two symphony orchestras), arts (more museums than rainy days according to one advertising slogan), and the natural landscape beyond the city-limits.  This portion of the course will be supported by travel to the Baltic Sea Coast and Dresden.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Berlin overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 262 20th Century Art and Architecture

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Surveys German art and architecture from the rise of modernism circa 1900 through postmodernism and the present. It aims to: study the individual works closely and interpret them critically by analyzing their formal structure, style, technique, iconography, etc.; consider the concerns of the artists who created them; and place the works within their wider historical, political, economic, social, and cultural backgrounds as well as within the international development of the visual arts in Europe and—in the second half of the 20th century—the U.S. Topics include Jugendstil (Art Nouveau), Expressionism, Dada, Surrealism, New Objectivity and Magic Realism, Bauhaus, art and architecture in Nazi Germany, art and architecture in the two German states—the GDR and FRG (1945-1989)—and the reflection of the German past, the reshaping of Berlin as the restored capital of Germany after 1989, and Pluralism in postmodern German art. An essential approach of the course is to work not only with slides and textual sources in class, but also with the original works during several field study visits to museums and walking tours to architectural sites. Thus the specific material qualities of the artworks discussed, and the urban context of the individual buildings, are experienced directly. This can serve as an eye-opener to understand the thinking and artistic procedure of the artists and architects in their time.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Berlin overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 263 Metropolitan Development: Urban Studies in Comparative Perspective

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Examines Berlin's complicated and often turbulent development, taking advantage of the city to explore its urban landscape firsthand, and ask whether the forces that continue to forge Berlin's identity are the same that have been at work in other European and American cities. Students in the course visit many of the city's historic sites, and in class compare them to urban prototypes in Paris, Vienna, St. Petersburg, New York, Los Angeles, Lagos, and Dubai—among other cities. How have absolutist policies, whether monarchic or totalitarian, influenced the city? How have periods of powerful economic growth, whether spurred by industrial revolution or the "economic miracle" of the post-war Wirtschaftswunder, determined urban growth? How have the 20th century's primary competing ideological systems—democratic market capitalism and Communism—altered the course of urban development in Europe? Berlin offers a unique opportunity to examine these questions in the one location where they have all played a vital role. The course devotes time to important urban issues, both historical and actual: the relationship of municipal and state government in city planning (the transformation of Paris under Baron Haussmann and Napoleon III in the 19th century; the works programs of Robert Moses in New York City in the 20th century); the role of the automobile in the propagation of suburban sprawl; the impact of new technology on urban development; the city as an imperial or (post-)colonial power center; demographic challenges (shrinking versus expanding cities); the emergence of specific urban movements (Garden City, modernism, postmodernism, "Critical Reconstruction," "New Urbanism"); contrasting patterns of racism, poverty, and immigration; security in an age of terrorism; and the impact of global warming.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Berlin overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 264 Irish History Through Literature

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: This course studies a series of literary engagements with some key moments in modern Irish history and explores what they tell us about the past and the conditions of the moment in which the story was told.  Mixing literature with film and painting, the course outlines a narrative of the formation of modern Ireland, providing an opportunity to explore questions about the nature of history and its representation.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance into Ireland Regional Area Study Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 265 Contemporary Irish Theater

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: The Irish theatre tradition is one of the most influential, successful and theatrically vibrant of modern times, and this course provides students with an opportunity to explore its contemporary condition both textually and in performance.  It will examine current trends in Irish dramatic writing, explore the traditions and methodologies of different Dublin theaters, familiarize students with the form and aesthetics of theatre review, and provide drama workshop experience.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance into Ireland Regional Area Study Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 266 Social Change in Ireland

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: This course offers students an overview of the contemporary Irish social/cultural landscape.  It draws on alternative theories and views of social change to analyze a wide variety of social issues and developments influencing the country’s national identity.  Topics include: migration, family and gender relations, religion and the role of the Catholic Church, the Celtic Tiger phenomenon, government social policy, and Ireland’s status as a post-colonial nation.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance into Ireland Regional Area Study Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 267 Art and Architecture of Dublin

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Introduction to the art (and artists) and architecture of Dublin. Dublin is immortalized in song, prose and poetry, and yet less is known of the visual artists who create and created the streets, buildings, and monuments of this great city. This course explores the influences, legacies, and contexts in which these artists applied their craft to reflect the style, function, power, and privilege of the eras in which they lived and worked.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance into Ireland Regional Area Study Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 272 Modern Italian History

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: On March 17, 1861 the Italian Parliament convened for the first time.  That date, symbolic of Italian unification, could also be taken as the beginning of the long process, which ended in the creation of a government and a nation. By looking at the most significant periods of Nineteenth and Twentieth century Italian history (Unification, birth of Sovereignty, the Great War, Fascism, the Second World War, the Resistance, the constitution of the Republic), we will trace the profound social, political and economic transformations that changed the face of the population and its sense of national identity throughout over 150 years of history.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Italy (Siena) Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 273 Topics in Art History

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: This course offers on rotation a series of different topics of Italian Art History.  Based not only on specific time periods but also on themes that tie various historical or cultural eras together, each semester offers an opportunity to explore topics ranging from a brief but exhaustive panorama of Italian Romanticism, to a specific theme-based topic such as the use of the portrait in the Renaissance.  For each historical and cultural era or topic, we’ll examine major themes and artists, thus opening windows onto the cultural and historical worlds of each topic or period.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Italy (Siena) Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 274 Religious Cultures and Traditions in Italy 

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Foundations and contributions of Christianity in the cultural development of Italy, in particular in the Tuscany region, from the Roman Empire to the twentieth century. Exploration of how religion is expressed and shaped through art history, literature, and popular media.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Italy (Siena) Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 275 Introduction to Sociolinguistics

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: History, regional variety, and structure of the Italian language through a study of sociolinguistics; Latinate origins of the language; study of dialects and diastratic variation; Italian in mass media and as an "ethnic language" abroad.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Italy (Siena) Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 276 Emigration in Italy and Europe During the Globalization Era

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Wide overview of the migratory processes and movements from and to Italy in the past thirty years. Analysis of the reasons and consequences of this transformation; Italian emigration in the twenty-first century; extra-European emigration; the impact of movement on Italian society.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Italy (Siena) Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 277 Contemporary Spain

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: The structures of Spanish society and the currents of change that continue to influence contemporary Spain. Exploration of the values of the Spanish family, youth, and women; migratory movements, the process of urbanization, and conflict between national and regional interests; political parties and labor unions in society with emphasis on Andalusian society. 
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Spain (Seville) Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 278 Art History of Spain

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: The major artistic expressions of the Spanish people in painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the cave paintings of antiquity to the artists of the modern period, with special attention to the styles related to Seville.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Spain (Seville) Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 279 Crossroads: Spain and Immigration

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Spain’s encounters with new populations from the earliest period of national consciousness to the present. Consideration of the contemporary reality that recent waves of immigration have brought, looking beyond to the political, economic, and social realities that underlie our observations. Effects of the centuries of contacts that formed Andalusian and Spanish identity through the movements of peoples from the south and east across the Mediterranean. Spain’s unique experience and relationship with the Arab world, in history and in the reality of Seville today. Presentations, guest lectures, visits to relevant sites and monuments.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Spain (Seville) Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 280 Contemporary Cuban Voices

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Introduction to a wide variety of contemporary Cuban intellectuals, artists and writers through weekly guest lectures.  Students will also be asked to process their experiences and discuss the guest lectures.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Cuba Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 281 Community-Based Research

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Introduction to basic oral history and ethnographic methodologies. Students will develop field research projects through internships and participant-observation.  Their projects will culminate in a 15 page field-research paper.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Cuba Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 282 Art and Culture in Modern Cuba

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Examines major trends and movements in Cuban music, film, dance, and plastic arts in the twentieth century.  The course will not only teach students how to appreciate these cultural expressions, but it will situate these movements within the context of the evolving Cuban society.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Cuba Overseas Program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 284 Contemporary Ecuador

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Explores different aspects of Ecuador through an anthropological optic. The main purpose is to provide students with information, conceptual tools, and methods with which to investigate and interpret their Ecuadorian experience. Class discussion and questions from students are very important. The specific topics covered in the course are chosen anew each semester, in order to address current affairs and new anthropological work. Globalization, Andean prehistory, traditional medicine, identity politics, indigenous rights movements, gender roles, religion and society, race, ethnicity, witchcraft, agricultural economics, transnational migration and Plan Colombia are some of the topics included in recent courses. Social structure and culture in Cuenca are also included.  The course includes day trips and a week-long fieldtrip. Some class assignments require students to investigate and report on questions about Cuenca and its environments. Course material is presented in required readings and class lectures. There are films and occasionally guest speakers to complement this material. Grades are based on exams, short writing assignments, and a term paper.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to Ecuador overseas program.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 290 Area Study: Australia

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Traces the major developments in Australia’s history from its initial settlement by the aboriginal people through European colonization and into the present. Emphasis is on the events that played a major role in shaping contemporary Australian society and Australia’s current relationships with East Asia, the United States, and the British Commonwealth. Topics include Australian literature, non-indigenous art, exploration and settlement, military history, and political and social institutions.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance into Australia overseas Program
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 291 Contemporary Australia

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Provides insight into important contemporary social issues, including population demographics, multiculturalism, gender issues, treatment of indigenous peoples, family and youth issues, crime and violence.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance into Australia overseas program
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 292 Aboriginal Studies

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Investigations of the evolution of human society in Australia, cultural diversity among indigenous peoples, social organization, ceremonies and art, spiritual life, material culture, gender roles, and relationship to the land. 
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance into Australia overseas program
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 294 Cultural Ecology of New Zealand

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Introduction to Pacific Islander and Maori culture and language. Extended Maori visit. Indigenous art and relevant cultural artifact production. Contemporary business and recreational activities.
Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Acceptance to New Zealand overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 295 Repeated Colonization, a History of New Zealand

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Provides insight into important contemporary social issues, including population demographics, multiculturalism, gender issues, treatment of indigenous peoples, family and youth issues, crime and violence.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Acceptance to New Zealand overseas program.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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IS 356 Advanced Topics in Humanities: London

Faculty: Overseas Faculty
Content: Taught by the faculty leader of the London humanities overseas program, this course will focus on an advanced humanities topic within the leader’s discipline. The course will make use of London-based resources and will incorporate site visits. Topics will vary by year within the humanities.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing and participation in the London Humanities Program.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.