Undergraduate Catalog

Neuroscience

Codirectors: Tamily Weissman-Unni and Yueping Zhang

The interdisciplinary neuroscience minor is designed to allow students an opportunity to explore the fast-growing field of neuroscience from multiple perspectives. Students develop an in-depth understanding of nervous-system function in a structured and rigorous way while pursuing a major in another discipline. The minor draws from multiple departments and programs, including Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Biology, Chemistry, Foreign Languages and Literatures, Mathematical Sciences, Philosophy, Physics, and Psychology.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 22 semester credits (six courses), distributed as follows:

  • BIO 252 Introduction to Neuroscience or PSY 252 Introduction to Neuroscience
  • One 300- or 400-level neuroscience course with laboratory, chosen from the following:
    BIO 380Behavioral Genetics
    BIO 422Neurobiology
    PSY 350Behavioral Neuroscience
    PSY 355Cognitive Neuroscience
  • One 300- or 400-level neuroscience course chosen from the following:
    BIO 380Behavioral Genetics
    BIO 422Neurobiology
    BIO 490Special Topics in Biology (when the focus is neuroscience)
    CHEM 421Neurochemistry
    PSY 350Behavioral Neuroscience
    PSY 355Cognitive Neuroscience
    PSY 380Drugs and Behavior
    PSY 410Advanced Topics in Neuroscience
  • Three elective courses chosen from the following list. At least one of these courses must be from biology or chemistry, and at least one must be from outside of biology and chemistry. Students are strongly encouraged to take neuroscience electives outside of their own major, and may ask the program director for permission to use only courses from outside their major. 
    BCMB 496Biochemistry/Molecular Biology Senior Research (when topic has been approved by Neuroscience Program Committee)
    BIO 200Investigations in Cell and Molecular Biology (cannot apply if major is biology)
    BIO 320Human Genes and Disease
    BIO 352Animal Behavior
    BIO 369Developmental Biology
    BIO 380Behavioral Genetics
    BIO 422Neurobiology
    BIO 490Special Topics in Biology (when the focus is neuroscience)
    BIO 495Biology Senior Thesis (when topic has been approved by Neuroscience Program Committee)
    CHEM 330Structural Biochemistry
    CHEM 421Neurochemistry
    CHEM 480Senior Research (when topic has been approved by Neuroscience Program Committee)
    CS 369Artificial Intelligence
    FL 240Introduction to Linguistics
    PHIL 312Philosophy of Language
    PHIL 313Philosophy of Mind
    PHYS 380Topics in Physics (when the focus is biomedical imaging)
    PSY 220Thinking, Memory, and Problem Solving
    PSY 310Cognition
    PSY 350Behavioral Neuroscience
    PSY 355Cognitive Neuroscience
    PSY 375Health Psychology
    PSY 380Drugs and Behavior
    PSY 400Advanced Topics in Psychology (when topic has been approved by Neuroscience Program Committee)
    PSY 410Advanced Topics in Neuroscience
    PSY 490Senior Thesis (when topic has been approved by Neuroscience Program Committee)

At least 12 semester credits must be discrete to the minor and may not be used in any other set of major/minor requirements.

Faculty

Cliff T. Bekar. Associate professor of economics, chair of the Department of Economics. Economic history, industrial organization, game theory. Ph.D. 2000, M.A. 1992, B.A. 1990 Simon Fraser University.

Kenneth E. Clifton. Professor of biology. Animal behavior, marine biology, ecology of coral reefs. Ph.D. 1988 University of California at Santa Barbara. B.A. 1981 University of California at San Diego.

Rebecca Copenhaver. Professor of philosophy. Early modern philosophy, philosophy of mind, ethics. Ph.D. 2001, M.A. 1998 Cornell University. B.A. 1993 University of California at Santa Cruz.

Janet E. Davidson. Associate professor of psychology, director of academic advising. Infant and child development, developmental psychopathology, internships. Ph.D. 1989, M.Phil. 1987, M.S. 1985 Yale University. B.S. 1975 University of Washington.

Keith Dede. Professor of Chinese. Chinese language and linguistics. Ph.D. 1999, M.A. 1993, B.A. 1988 University of Washington.

Peter Drake. Associate professor of computer science. Artificial intelligence/cognitive science. Programming languages. Ph.D. 2002 Indiana University. M.S. 1995 Oregon State University. B.A. 1993 Willamette University.

Greg J. Hermann. Professor of biology, chair of the Department of Biology. Developmental genetics and cell biology. Ph.D. 1998 University of Utah. B.S. 1992 Gonzaga University.

Janis E. Lochner. Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Professor of Science. Biochemistry. Ph.D. 1981 Oregon Health Sciences University. B.S. 1976 Allegheny College.

Deborah E. Lycan. Professor of biology. Molecular biology, cell biology, ribosome biogenesis in eukaryotic cells, yeast genetics. Ph.D. 1983 University of Colorado. B.A. 1975 University of California at San Diego.

Erik L. Nilsen. Associate professor of psychology. Cognition, methodology, human-computer interaction. Ph.D. 1991, M.A. 1986 University of Michigan. B.A. 1984 Graceland College.

Arthur O'Sullivan. Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Professor of Economics. Urban economics, regional economics, microeconomic theory. Ph.D. 1981 Princeton University. B.S. 1975 University of Oregon.

Todd Watson. Associate professor of psychology, chair of the Department of Psychology (spring). Cognitive neuroscience, brain and behavior, statistics. Ph.D. 2005 State University of New York at Stony Brook. M.A. 2000 Radford University. B.S. 1997 Pennsylvania State University.

Tamily Weissman-Unni. Assistant professor of biology, co-director of the Neuroscience Program. Neurobiology. Ph.D. 2004 Columbia University. B.A. 1992 Pomona College.

Yueping Zhang. Associate professor of psychology, co-director of the Neuroscience Program. Behavioral neuroscience, brain and behavior, drugs and behavior, cross-cultural psychology. Ph.D. 1996, M.A. 1992 University of New Hampshire. M.D. 1985 Shandong Medical University.