Undergraduate Catalog

History

Chair: Elliott Young
Administrative Coordinator: Debbie Richman

Historians study the past, yet they never become disconnected from the present. What we are and will be is rooted in what we were. In uncovering the past, historians reveal to us the political, cultural, and economic elements that have shaped our world. This is how we write and teach history at Lewis & Clark. Our curriculum is global in scope, inviting students to compare the traditions of various cultures and countries. We offer sufficient depth in the history of the Americas, Europe, and Asia to allow students to develop sophisticated knowledge of these regions in the modern and premodern eras. Moreover, our emphasis on research and writing equips our students with skills appropriate to a wide range of pursuits.

A critical understanding of how history is crafted is as important as learning historical details. The development of research and writing skills is one of the main objectives of the department’s program. All majors take a unique methods course called Historical Materials, which focuses on how to find and use historical documents—books, manuscripts, periodicals, newspapers, maps, photographs—as research tools. In a second required course called Reading Colloquium, students read the best literature in a field selected by the instructor and come to grips with the variety of ways history is written and interpreted. In the history research seminar, majors conduct intensive research on a particular topic and present their findings to their classmates in the form of a thesis. This series of courses prepares students to use research and writing skills in whatever career they choose and equips them to be discerning students of history throughout the course of their lives.

 

Resources for Nonmajors

All of the department's course offerings are open to nonmajors. Preference is given to majors and minors for enrollment in HIST 300 Historical Materials, HIST 400 Reading Colloquium, and HIST 450 History Seminar.

The Major Program

The department curriculum focuses on three primary geographical fields: the Americas, Asia, and Europe. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in the introductory sequences as a foundation for more advanced study in these concentrations. History majors are required to complete some work in each of the three fields in order to obtain a breadth of historical understanding. Most introductory sequences are offered at the 100 level. The entry-level U.S. sequence (HIST 134 and HIST 135) is offered at the 100 level and is open to first-year students.

The department counsels students to take courses in related fields of language, literature, fine arts, social sciences, and international affairs to deepen their understanding of their area of concentration.

Major Requirements

A minimum of 40 semester credits (10 courses), distributed as follows:

  • HIST 300 Historical Materials

  • HIST 400 Reading Colloquium

  • HIST 450 History Seminar

  • Seven other history courses. At least one must be in Asian history, one in European history, and one in the history of the Americas. At least one of the seven courses must be in premodern Asian, European, or Latin American history, or in religious studies. 

    At least two of the seven courses must be at the 300 level, excluding HIST 300 Historical Materials.

Students may apply a maximum of 4 semester credits from HIST 244/HIST 444 toward the major. HIST 218 Perspectives on the Vietnam War may be counted toward either the Asian or American history requirement.

The following courses may be used as electives for the major in the primary geographical and premodern areas as specified:

Primary Geographical Fields

The Americas

HIST 134United States: Revolution to Empire
HIST 135United States: Empire to Superpower
HIST 141Colonial Latin American History
HIST 142Modern Latin American History
HIST 218Perspectives on the Vietnam War
HIST 231AU.S. Women's History, 1600 to 1980
HIST 233History of New York
HIST 235History of the Pacific Northwest
HIST 239Constructing the American Landscape
HIST 240Race and Ethnicity in the United States
HIST 242Borderlands: U.S.-Mexico Border, 16th Century to Present
HIST 331American Culture and Society: 1880 to 1980
HIST 335History and Culture of American Indians
HIST 336Wilderness and the American West
HIST 345Race and Nation in Latin America
HIST 347Modern Mexico: Culture, Politics, and Economic Crisis
HIST 348Modern Cuba
ECON 256The Industrial Revolution
LAS 200Latin American Cultural Studies
RELS 253Religion in American History to the Civil War
RELS 254Religion in Modern America, 1865 to Present
RELS 340Women in American Religious History

 Asia

HIST 110Early East Asian History
HIST 111Making Modern China
HIST 112Making Modern Japan
HIST 209Japan at War
HIST 210China's Golden Age (Tang and Song)
HIST 211Reform, Rebellion, and Revolution in Modern China
HIST 213Chinese History Through Biography
HIST 217The Emergence of Modern South Asia
HIST 218Perspectives on the Vietnam War
HIST 228Middle East in Modern Times
HIST 259India in the Age of Empire
HIST 288China in the News: Socio-Anthropological and Historical Perspective on Modern China
HIST 310China Discovers the West: Silk, Jesuits, Tea, Opium, and Milk
HIST 311History of Family, Gender, and Sexuality in China
HIST 313Religion, Society, and the State in Japanese History
HIST 316Popular Culture and Everyday Life in Japanese History

 Europe

HIST 120Early European History
HIST 121Modern European History
HIST 216Ancient Greece
HIST 219Ancient Rome: From Republic to Empire
HIST 221Tudor and Stuart Britain, 1485 to 1688
HIST 222Britain in the Age of Revolution, 1688 to 1815
HIST 224The Making of Modern Britain, 1815 to Present
HIST 225Europe in the Age of the French Revolution
HIST 22620th-Century Germany
HIST 227Medieval Europe, 800 to 1400
HIST 229The Holocaust in Comparative Perspective
HIST 320Humanism in Renaissance Europe
HIST 323Modern European Intellectual History
HIST 324Saints and Bureaucrats
HIST 325History of Islam in Europe
HIST 326History of Soviet Russia
HIST 328The British Empire
ECON 255Technology, Institutions, and Economic Growth
ECON 256The Industrial Revolution
RELS 251Medieval Christianity
RELS 373Reformations of the 16th Century

 Premodern

HIST 110Early East Asian History
HIST 120Early European History
HIST 141Colonial Latin American History
HIST 210China's Golden Age (Tang and Song)
HIST 216Ancient Greece
HIST 219Ancient Rome: From Republic to Empire
HIST 221Tudor and Stuart Britain, 1485 to 1688
HIST 227Medieval Europe, 800 to 1400
HIST 259India in the Age of Empire
HIST 320Humanism in Renaissance Europe
HIST 324Saints and Bureaucrats
RELS 251Medieval Christianity
RELS 373Reformations of the 16th Century

 Minor Requirements

A minimum of 24 semester credits (six courses), which must include:

  • HIST 300 Historical Materials
  • HIST 400 Reading Colloquium or HIST 450 History Seminar
  • At least one course at the 300 level, excluding HIST 300 Historical Materials
  • Two additional history courses, each one from a different geographical field: Asian history, European history, and history of the Americas.  Courses from other departments do not apply.

Honors

Each year the department invites meritorious students with an overall GPA of at least 3.500 to participate in the honors program. Students choose a faculty member with whom they want to work on a research project. The program may involve a major paper based on primary source materials or an extensive review and evaluation of the secondary literature in a particular subject area. Students present the project to the department. Following an oral examination, the department determines whether to grant honors on graduation.

Practicum Program

Because history is useful in a variety of careers, the department encourages students in their junior or senior year to participate in a practicum. History practica have placed students in a variety of settings, including the museum and library of the Oregon Historical Society, publishing companies, land-use-planning agencies, historic preservation organizations, and other enterprises needing the skills of a person knowledgeable in the liberal arts and trained in history.

The practicum is usually an off-campus experience designed by the student in conjunction with an off-campus supervisor and a faculty supervisor according to departmental guidelines. Arrangements on and off campus must be made with the appropriate supervising persons in the semester prior to enrollment.

Faculty

Andrew Bernstein. Associate professor of history. Japanese history. Ph.D. 1999, M.Phil. 1996, M.A. 1994 Columbia University. B.A. 1990 Amherst College.

David A. Campion. Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Associate Professor of History, ROTC coordinator. British and South Asian history. Ph.D. 2002, M.A. 1997 University of Virginia. B.A. 1991 Georgetown University.

David H. Galaty. Assistant professor with term of humanities. Ph.D. 1971 Johns Hopkins University. B.A. 1964 Trinity College.

Susan L. Glosser. Associate professor of history. Chinese history. Ph.D. 1995 University of California at Berkeley. M.A. 1985, B.A. 1983 State University of New York at Binghamton.

Maureen Healy. Associate professor of history. European history, women's and gender history, war and genocide. Ph.D. 2000, M.A. 1994 University of Chicago. B.A. 1990 Tufts University.

Reiko Hillyer. Assistant professor with term of history. U.S. South, African American history, history of the built. Ph.D. 2006, M.Phil. 2001, M.A. 1999 Columbia University. B.A. 1991 Yale University.

Jane H. Hunter. Professor of history. U.S. history, post-Civil War, women's history. Ph.D. 1981, M.A. 1975, B.A. 1971 Yale University.

Benjamin W. Westervelt. Associate professor of history. Medieval and early modern European history. Ph.D. 1993 Harvard University. M.T.S. 1985 Harvard Divinity School. B.A. 1982 Brandeis University.

Elliott Young. Associate professor of history, chair of the Department of History. Latin American and U.S.-Mexico Borderlands history. Ph.D. 1997, M.A. 1993 University of Texas at Austin. B.A. 1989 Princeton University.

Courses

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HIST 110 Early East Asian History

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: Early histories of China and Japan from earliest origins to the 13th century. Prehistory; early cultural foundations; development of social, political, and economic institutions; art and literature. Readings from Asian texts in translation. The two cultures, covered as independent entities, compared to each other and to European patterns of development.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 111 Making Modern China

Faculty: Glosser.
Content: Key events and institutions in China from the 13th to the 20th century through primary sources (philosophical and religious texts, vernacular fiction, contemporary accounts and essays, translated documents). Social and familial hierarchies, gender roles, imperialism, contact with the West, state-society relations, nationalism, modernization.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 112 Making Modern Japan

Faculty: Bernstein.
Content: History of Japan from the start of the Tokugawa shogunate to the end of the 20th century. Tokugawa ideology, political economy, urban culture; intellectual and social upheavals leading to the Meiji Restoration; the Japanese response to the West; rapid industrialization and its social consequences; problems of modernity and the emperor system; Japanese colonialism and militarism; the Pacific war; postwar developments in economy, culture, politics.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 120 Early European History

Faculty: Westervelt.
Content: Social, intellectual, political, and economic elements of European history, 800 to 1648. Role of Christianity in the formation of a dominant culture; feudalism and the development of conflicts between secular and religious life. Contacts with the non-European world, the Crusades, minority groups, popular and elite cultural expressions. Intellectual and cultural life of the High Middle Ages, secular challenges of the Renaissance, divisions of European culture owing to the rise of national monarchies and religious reformations.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 121 Modern European History

Faculty: Healy.
Content: Social, intellectual, political, and economic elements of European history, 1648 to the present. The scientific revolution, Enlightenment, national political revolutions, capitalism, industrial development, overseas imperial expansion. The formation of mass political and social institutions, avant-garde and popular culture, the Thirty Years' War of the 20th century, bolshevism, fascism, the Cold War, and the revolutions of 1989.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 134 United States: Revolution to Empire

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: Introduction to the United States. How the young American nation coped with major changes and adjustments in its first century. Emergence of political parties; wars with Indians and Mexico, and expansion into a continental nation; the lingering problem of slavery; the rise of industry and urbanization; immigration; the development of arts and letters into a new national culture.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 135 United States: Empire to Superpower

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: The power of the United States in the world, from the Spanish-American War to Iraq. American economic growth and its consequences. The federal government and the people. Mass society and mass marketing. Changing political alignments, the policy elite, and "political will." The welfare state, women's and minority rights.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 141 Colonial Latin American History

Faculty: Young.
Content: History of Latin America from Native American contact cultures through the onset of independence movements in the early 19th century. Cultural confrontations, change, and Native American accommodation and strategies of evasion in dealing with the Hispanic colonial empire.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 142 Modern Latin American History

Faculty: Young.
Content: Confrontation with the complexity of modern Latin America through historical analysis of the roots of contemporary society, politics, and culture. Through traditional texts, novels, films, and lectures, exploration of the historical construction of modern Latin America. Themes of unity and diversity, continuity and change as framework for analyzing case studies of selected countries.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 209 Japan at War

Faculty: Bernstein.
Content: In-depth study of the causes, dynamics, and outcomes of the wars fought by Japan in Asia and the Pacific from the late 19th century through World War II. The trajectories of Japanese imperialism, sequence of events leading to the attack on Pearl Harbor, social impact of total war. Japan's wartime culture as seen through diaries, newspaper articles, propaganda films, short stories, government documents. Short- and long-term effects of the atomic bomb and the American occupation of Japan.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 210 China's Golden Age (Tang and Song)

Faculty: Glosser.
Content: The Tang and Song dynasties, 7th to the 13th century. Transition from one dynasty to the next. Changes in the elite classes, transformation of women's roles, rulership and landholding, philosophical developments, aesthetic expression. How these developments defined the issues and set the context for China's contact with the West and its emergence into the modern world. Literature, religious texts, art, dress, biographies, and political and philosophical essays.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 211 Reform, Rebellion, and Revolution in Modern China

Faculty: Glosser.
Content: The commercial revolution of the 12th century and the cultural flowering and political structures of Ming and early Qing dynasties (1367 to 1800) that shaped China's response to Western invasion. Major peasant rebellions, elite reforms, and political revolutions of the last 150 years including the Opium War, Taiping Rebellion, Hundred Days Reform, Boxer Rebellion, collapse of the Qing dynasty, Nationalist and Communist revolutions.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 213 Chinese History Through Biography

Faculty: Glosser.
Content: Political, economic, and cultural history of China, traced through the lives of individual Chinese, including the mighty and the low: venerable philosophers and historians, powerful women, mighty emperors, conscientious officials, laboring women and men, evangelizing missionaries, zealots of all political persuasions. Sixth century B.C.E. to late 20th century, with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. Lectures cover the historical milieu in which the various subjects lived. Through class discussion and essay assignments, students unite their knowledge of particular individuals and the broad sweep of events to form a rich and lively familiarity with Chinese history.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 216 Ancient Greece

Faculty: Kelly.
Content: An introduction to the history and civilization of Ancient Greece, from the early Archaic era in mid-8th-century BC to the death of Socrates in 399 BC. Topics include constitutional changes from monarchy through oligarchy and tyranny to democracy, the development of the Greek polis, contacts with Near Eastern civilizations, hegemony and imperialism, social structure, trade, and colonization. Readings will focus on ancient historical writings in translation and will highlight the challenges in interpreting evidence from antiquity.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 217 The Emergence of Modern South Asia

Faculty: Campion.
Content: The social, economic, and political history of the Indian subcontinent from the 18th century to the present. The cultural foundations of Indian Society; the East India Company and the expansion of British power; the experience of Indians under the British Raj; Gandhi and the rise of Indian nationalism; independence and partition; postcolonial South Asian developments in politics, economy, and culture. Thematic emphasis on the causes and consequences of Western imperialism, religious and cultural identities, and competing historical interpretations.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 218 Perspectives on the Vietnam War

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: A broadly humanistic and introductory perspective on the problem of the Vietnam War. Root causes of the war from Vietnamese and American perspectives; the nature of the war as it developed and concluded. The war as a problem in American domestic politics.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 219 Ancient Rome: From Republic to Empire

Faculty: Kelly.
Content: A history of Rome from the foundation of the Roman Republic in the late 5th century B.C. to the end of the Severan dynasty in 235 A.D. Special emphasis on Rome's political transformation from a republic to an empire and the effect of this transition on Roman civilization. Topics include Roman conquest and imperialism, religion, contact with other Mediterranean cultures, class conflict, law and governance, slavery, and family structure. The interpretation of primary source materials (especially ancient historical writings) and the problems of reconstructing the history of a civilization that flourished 2,000 years ago.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 221 Tudor and Stuart Britain, 1485 to 1688

Faculty: Campion.
Content: The development of the British Isles from the late medieval period to the Glorious Revolution. The church and state in late medieval Britain; the English and Scottish reformations; Elizabeth and her realm; the evolution of monarchical and aristocratic power under the Tudors and Stuarts; Shakespeare, Milton, and the English literary renaissance; the conquest and settlement of Ireland; Cromwell, the Puritans, and the English Civil War; life in the villages and the growth of the mercantile economy; the Glorious Revolution and the shaping of constitutional monarchy.
Prerequisites: None. HIST 120 recommended.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 222 Britain in the Age of Revolution, 1688 to 1815

Faculty: Campion.
Content: A history of Britain and its people from the Glorious Revolution to the end of the Napoleonic War. The end of absolutism and the rise of the constitutional monarchy; the Augustan Age: arts, letters, and religion; the Atlantic world and British overseas expansion; the Enlightenment and scientific revolution; the American Revolution and its aftermath; union with Scotland and Ireland and the creation of the British national identity; the revolution in France and the wars against Napoleon; the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution.
Prerequisites: None. HIST 121 recommended.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 224 The Making of Modern Britain, 1815 to Present

Faculty: Campion.
Content: The history of Britain from the Industrial Revolution to the present. Industrialization and its social consequences; the shaping of Victorian society; the rise and fall of the British Empire; the Irish question and the emancipation of women; political reform and the rise of mass politics; Britain in the age of total war; popular culture, immigration, and the making of multicultural Britain. Themes include the growth of the social and economic class structure, the shaping of national and regional identities, cultural exchanges with the empire. Extensive use of primary sources, literature, music.
Prerequisites: None. HIST 121 recommended.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 225 Europe in the Age of the French Revolution

Faculty: Healy.
Content: Social, economic, and intellectual origins of the revolution of 1789; major developments in France; the spread of revolution to the remainder of Europe. European responses to the threat of revolution, defeat of the Napoleonic armies, the attempt to return to normalcy after 1815.
Prerequisites: None. HIST 121 recommended.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 226 20th-Century Germany

Faculty: Healy.
Content: Origins and consequences of World War I; attempts to develop a republican government; Nazism; evolution of the two Germanies after 1945 and their reunification. Readings on relationship between individual and state, pressures for conformity, possibility of dissent.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 227 Medieval Europe, 800 to 1400

Faculty: Westervelt.
Content: Social, intellectual, political, and cultural elements of European life during the period from about 800 to 1400. Emphasis on Christianity as a dominant aspect of public life; feudalism and other forms of economic and social life; developing conflicts between secular and ecclesiastical institutions; emergence of European nation-states; contacts with the non-European world; high medieval culture.
Prerequisites: None. HIST 120 recommended.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 228 Middle East in Modern Times

Faculty: Powers (Religious Studies)
Content: The Middle East, its religious and cultural contributions, indigenous empires, and outside imperialists. The region's strategic significance as the connecting link to three continents. Effects on the region of the discovery of oil in the 20th century. The impact of nationalism on each nation's viability in the region, economic dilemmas, pressing national problems.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Every third year, summer only.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 229 The Holocaust in Comparative Perspective

Faculty: Healy.
Content: The Nazi genocide of European Jews during World War II in comparison to other cases of 20th-century mass violence in countries such as Armenia, Cambodia, the former Yugoslavia, and Rwanda. Nazi Germany serves as the principal case study for discussion of the broader question: What has made possible the organization and execution of mass violence against specific ethnic and religious groups in a wide variety of societies around the world over the past century? Includes examination of strategies for the prevention of future incidents of mass ethnic violence.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 231A U.S. Women's History, 1600 to 1980

Faculty: Hunter.
Content: The diverse experiences of American women from the colonial era to the recent past. Changing ideologies from the colonial goodwife to the cult of true womanhood. Impact of Victorianism, sexuality and reproduction, the changing significance of women's work. Origins of the women's rights movement, battles and legacy of suffrage, history of 20th-century feminism, competing ideologies and experiences of difference.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 233 History of New York

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: An overview of the urban history and urban structure of New York. Emphasis on examining the process of continuity and change of New York from the colonial period to the 20th century. Offered on New York program.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing and acceptance into the New York study abroad program is required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 235 History of the Pacific Northwest

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: Historical development of the Pacific Northwest over the past 200 years. Native American cultures, Euro-American exploration and settlement, fur trade, missions, overland emigration, resource development, the question of regionalism.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 239 Constructing the American Landscape

Faculty: Hillyer.
Content: Political, social, economic, and aesthetic forces that have helped shape ordinary built environments: farms, fast-food restaurants, theme parks, sports stadiums, highways, prisons, public housing. Patterns of economic growth and decline, technological innovation, segregation, gentrification, capital migration and globalization, historic preservation, and changing ideologies about nature and the city.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 240 Race and Ethnicity in the United States

Faculty: Hillyer.
Content: Investigation of the history of categories of race and ethnicity in the United States, primarily focused on the historical production of conceptions of racial and ethnic difference. Examines the origins, uses, and mutations of ideologies of race and ethnicity, as well as how these ideologies intersect with empire and nationalism, sexuality and gender, capitalism and labor relations, and scientific knowledge. Considers both chronological and thematic approaches. Examines scholarly work, visual culture, and memoir. Open to all students.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 242 Borderlands: U.S.-Mexico Border, 16th Century to Present

Faculty: Young.
Content: The concept and region known as the Borderlands from when it was part of northern New Spain to its present incarnation as the U.S.-Mexico border. Thematic focus on the roles of imperialism and capitalism in the formation of borderlands race, class, gender, and national identities. The transformation of this region from a frontier between European empires to a borderline between nations.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 244 Practicum

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: Experience in historical research, writing, interpreting, or planning. Specifics vary depending on placement with sponsoring agency. Eight credits may be applied to graduation requirements, but only 4 may be applied to major.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing and consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 1-4.

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HIST 259 India in the Age of Empire

Faculty: Campion.
Content: The political, cross-cultural, and social development of the Indian subcontinent from the classical civilizations of late antiquity to the beginnings of colonial rule in the 18th century. The artistic and architectural achievements of Indo-Islamic civilization; the Mughal Empire and regional polities; religious and cultural syncretism; the influence of contact with the West. Special emphasis on the historical antecedents of contemporary debates about regional identities, state formation and fragmentation, and the origins of colonial rule.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 261 Global Environmental History

Faculty: Bernstein.
Content: Introduction to major historical shifts in the relationship(s) between humans and their environment from prehistoric times to the present. Focuses particularly on Asia, Europe, and North America and covers such topics as the invention of agriculture, shifting conceptions and portrayals of nature, the exchange of biota between continents, responses to natural disasters, the ecological impact of the industrial revolution, and the 20th-century environmental movement. Exploration of the social, cultural, and political dimensions of environmental change through the work of environmental historians and a wide range of primary sources, including literature, artwork, philosophical texts, government documents, newspaper articles, and scientific data.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 288 China in the News: Socio-Anthropological and Historical Perspective on Modern China

Faculty: Glosser, Hubbert.
Content: Rarely a day goes by in the realm of contemporary American news that does not find China center stage. Whether through accolades of its avant-garde architecture, Olympic gold medals, and booming economy or critiques of its environmental practices, "neocolonialist" relationship with Africa, or domestic human rights, China has garnered an important space in the American public imaginary. China is a rapidly rising world power in an international arena witnessing the increasing economic instability and declining economic hegemony of Western nations, and its engagement in the global realm matters. We are interested in looking at China in the news in two different ways. First, this course will think topically about China as news. What is happening today in China both domestically and internationally that is worthy of international coverage? What are the historical precedents for such events and processes? How does understanding both the historical record and contemporary cultural formations help us to comprehend the significance of their current manifestation? Second, this course will think theoretically about China in the news. How is China represented in American media sources? What are the contours, influences, and ramifications of these representations? How do historical precedent and contemporary culture affect these representations?
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 299 Independent Study

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: Opportunities for well-prepared students to design and pursue a substantive course of independent learning. Details determined by the student and the supervising instructor. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing and consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 1-4.

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HIST 300 Historical Materials

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: Materials and craft of historical research. Bibliographic method; documentary editing; use of specialized libraries, manuscripts, maps, government documents, photographs, objects of material culture. Career options in history. Students work with primary sources to develop a major editing project. Topical content varies depending on instructor's teaching field. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 310 China Discovers the West: Silk, Jesuits, Tea, Opium, and Milk

Faculty: Glosser.
Content: The nature and extent of China's contact with other countries, including the silk roads to Middle Asia in the first millennium B.C.E., Jesuits and the influx of Spanish-American silver in the 16th century, British tea and opium trade, and Chinese intellectual experiments with social Darwinism, anarchism, communism, and the nuclear family ideal. Primary sources showing foreign and Chinese perceptions of the content and significance of these exchanges.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 311 History of Family, Gender, and Sexuality in China

Faculty: Glosser.
Content: Development of family structure, gender roles, and sexuality in Chinese history, explored through oracle bones, family instructions, tales of exemplary women, poetry, painting, drama, fiction, and calendar posters. Key movements in the transformation of family and gender from 1600 B.C.E. to the 20th century. Close readings of texts to explore how social, economic, religious, and political forces shaped family and gender roles.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 313 Religion, Society, and the State in Japanese History

Faculty: Bernstein.
Content: Japanese religious traditions and their impact on social and political structures from ancient times to the present. Examination of the doctrinal and institutional development of Buddhism, Confucianism, Shinto, and Christianity, as well as the creation and suppression of more marginal belief systems. Issues include pilgrimage, spirit possession, death practices, millenarianism, militarism, abortion, eco-spiritualism, and religious terrorism. Sources include canonical scriptures, short stories, diaries, government records, newspaper articles, artwork, films.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 316 Popular Culture and Everyday Life in Japanese History

Faculty: Bernstein.
Content: Popular culture as the site of social change and social control in Japan from the 18th to the 20th century. Religion and folk beliefs, work and gender roles, theatre and music, tourism, consumerism, citizens' movements, fashion, food, sports, sex, drugs, hygiene, and forms of mass media ranging from woodblock prints to modern comic books, film, television. Concepts as well as content of popular and mass culture.
Prerequisites: HIST 112 recommended.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 320 Humanism in Renaissance Europe

Faculty: Westervelt.
Content: Writings by major figures in the humanist movement from the 14th to the 16th century. Social, political, intellectual contexts of humanism in the university and Italian city-state; ideal of return to sources of classical culture; civic humanism; interplay between Christian and secular ideals; relationship between Italian and northern forms of humanism; relationship between Renaissance humanism and the Protestant Reformation; comparative experience of Renaissance humanists and artists.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 323 Modern European Intellectual History

Faculty: Healy.
Content: Approaches to the problem of ethical values in 19th- and 20th-century European thought, including Marxist, social Darwinist, Nietzschean, and Freudian perspectives; existentialism; postmodernism. Readings in philosophical, literary, artistic works.
Prerequisites: HIST 121 recommended.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 324 Saints and Bureaucrats

Content: Charism and bureaucracy in the careers of Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, and Teresa of Avila, of the Discalced Carmelites. Ignatius and Teresa as mystics, theologians, founders and/or reformers of religious orders, believers. Impact of national origin, social status, gender on their careers and on early modern Catholicism.
Prerequisites: None. HIST 120 or RELS 373 recommended.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 325 History of Islam in Europe

Faculty: Healy.
Content: The history of Islam in Europe from the medieval period to the present, focusing on various encounters between European Christians and Muslims. The crusades, Christian and Muslim presence in Iberia, Ottoman conquest in southeastern Europe, European colonial conquest, the role of Islam in post-1945 decolonization, and questions about Muslim immigration and European identity.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 326 History of Soviet Russia

Faculty: Healy.
Content: Examines tensions (political, social, cultural) of the final decades of the Romanov dynasty and traces the collapse of the 300-year-old empire during the First World War. Focus is largely on the 20th century. Topics include the Russian Revolution, "Soviet Man" (Homo Sovieticus), Stalinism, collectivization, terror, the "Great Patriotic War," Cold War culture, the Sovietization of Eastern Europe, the Brezhnev era, reforms of the Gorbachev period, the end of the Soviet Union, and legacies for Russia and the other successor states. Attention throughout to gender, family, nation, and concept of the individual in relation to the collective.
Prerequisites: None. HIST 121 recommended.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 328 The British Empire

Faculty: Campion.
Content: The history of British overseas expansion from the early 17th century to the end of the 20th century. Theories of imperialism; Britain's Atlantic trade network; the Victorian empire in war and peace; collaboration and resistance among colonized people; India under the British Raj; Africa and economic imperialism; the effects of empire on British society; the creation of the British Commonwealth; the rise of nationalism in India, Africa, and the Middle East; decolonization and postcolonial perspectives. Extensive readings from primary sources.
Prerequisites: HIST 121 recommended.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 331 American Culture and Society: 1880 to 1980

Faculty: Hunter.
Content: Formation of modern culture from the late Victorian era to the "me decade." The influence of consumer culture, popular psychology, mass media, changing definitions of work and leisure in the development of a modern self. Origins and impact of the gender and race revolutions, relationship of "high" and "popular" culture. Readings in primary and secondary sources.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 335 History and Culture of American Indians

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: Purposes of archaeology and its contributions to the understanding of North American prehistory, the culture-area hypothesis, relations with tribes from colonial times to the present, Native American responses. Federal Indian policy and its evolution over the past 200 years.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 336 Wilderness and the American West

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: History of the trans-Mississippi West, including Euro-American perceptions of North America, issues of progress and preservation, and environmental history. Role of the federal government; contributions of minorities, women, and men in shaping the trans-Mississippi West. Voices of those who have sought to develop and conserve the West.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 345 Race and Nation in Latin America

Faculty: Young.
Content: Social thought about race and nation in Latin America. The Iberian concept of pureza de sangre, development of criollo national consciousness, 20th-century indigenista movements. Linkages between national identities and constructions of race, particularly in the wake of revolutionary movements. Freyre (Brazil), Marti (Cuba), Vasconcelos (Mexico), and Sarmiento (Argentina)
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 347 Modern Mexico: Culture, Politics, and Economic Crisis

Faculty: Young.
Content: Origins and development of the modern Mexican nation from independence to the contemporary economic and political crisis. 1811 to 1940: liberal-conservative battles, imperialism, the pax Porfiriana, the Mexican Revolution, industrialization, and institutionalizing the revolution. 1940 to the present: urbanization, migration to the United States, the student movement, neoliberal economics and politics, disintegration of the PRI (Institutional Revolutionary Party), and the new social rebellions (Zapatistas, Popular Revolutionary Army, Civil Society). Constructing mexicanidad in music, dance, film, and the cultural poetics of the street and the town plaza.
Prerequisites: HIST 141 or HIST 142 recommended.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 348 Modern Cuba

Faculty: Young.
Content: Development of the modern Cuban nation from the independence movement of the mid-19th century to the contemporary socialist state. Focus on how identity changed under the Spanish colonial, U.S. neocolonial, Cuban republic, and revolutionary states. 1840s to 1898: wars of independence, slavery, transition to free labor. 1898 to 1952: U.S. occupation and neocolonialism, Afrocubanismo, populism. 1952 to the present: Castro revolution, socialism, U.S.-Cuban-Soviet relations.
Prerequisites: HIST 142 recommended.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 388 What's for Dinner

Faculty: Glosser.
Content: Cross-cultural examination of the history and cultural, political, and economic power of food. Topics include the power and politics exercised through ethnic/racial, gender, and class differences in food consumption; ways in which people express their religious, ethnic, class, gender, and regional identities through food; nostalgia for the food ways of the past and ideas about the food of the future; the history of manners and the cultural value of food etiquette; and "nutritionism," or why we think certain things are good for us. Materials include scholarly and popular books and essays, as well as primary sources.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 400 Reading Colloquium

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: Reading and critical analysis of major interpretive works. Organized around themes or problems; comparative study of historical works exemplifying different points of view, methodologies, subject matter. Focus varies depending on instructor's teaching and research area. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Annually.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 444 Practicum

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: Same as HIST 244 but requiring more advanced work. 8 credits may be applied to graduation requirements, but only 4 may be applied to the major.
Prerequisites: None..
Restrictions: Sophomore standing and consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 1-4.

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HIST 450 History Seminar

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: Work with primary documents to research and write a major paper that interprets history. Topical content varies depending on instructor's teaching field. Recent topics: the Americas; the United States and Asia; European intellectual history since 1945; women in American history; Indian policy on the Pacific slope; World War II, the participants' perspectives; the British Raj; cultural nationalism in East Asia. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.
Prerequisites: HIST 300.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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HIST 499 Independent Study

Faculty: History Faculty.
Content: Same as HIST 299 but requiring more advanced work. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing and consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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