Undergraduate Catalog

English

Chair: Will Pritchard
Administrative Coordinator: Debra Richman

The Department of English introduces students to a wide range of British and American literature, taught from a variety of critical perspectives. The department teaches students to read literary texts attentively and to write both effectively and persuasively about literature and its relation to tradition, culture, history, and experience. English courses also share the goal of helping students to think critically and in "real time," and to engage with others in the challenging task of interpretation and argument. In addition, courses in creative writing provide an opportunity for majors interested in writing poetry and fiction to develop their skills to an advanced level.

Resources for Nonmajors

All of the department's course offerings are open to nonmajors except the senior seminar. Preference is given to majors and minors for enrollment in ENG 205 and ENG 206 Major Periods and Issues in English Literature.

Courses

ENG 100 Topics in Literature

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Emphasis on a particular theme or subgenre in literature to be chosen by the professor. Recent topics have included heroines in British fiction, literature and the environment, love and the novel, history of the lyric poem, and literature of immigration. May be taken twice for credit with change of topic.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 105 The Art of the Novel

Faculty: Asher.
Content: Major works in English, American, and European fiction, from the 17th century to the present. Goals include increasing awareness of the particular kinds of knowledge and perception that the novel makes available; considering the variety of ways in which novels braid moral and aesthetic concerns; understanding how novels respond both to everyday human experience and to previous literary history; and heightening appreciation for the range of pleasures that the novel can afford. Writers may include Cervantes, Sterne, Austen, Flaubert, Kafka, Woolf, Nabokov, Kundera, Pynchon.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 200 Introduction to Fiction and Fiction Writing

Faculty: Toutonghi.
Content: Class offers focused, writing-based exercises, coupled with careful reading of different types of fiction, to help build a student's understanding of the fictional form. Creative work is produced and read in a workshop-based environment.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 201 Introduction to Poetry and Poetry Writing

Faculty: Szybist, Harp, English Faculty.
Content: Elements of poetry such as imagery, rhythm, tone. Practice in the craft. Frequent references to earlier poets.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 205 Major Periods and Issues in English Literature

Faculty: Asher, Gross, Harp, Pritchard.
Content: Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Middle Ages to end of 17th century. Enrollment preference given to English majors and minors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 206 Major Periods and Issues in English Literature

Faculty: Cole, Fosso, Fujie, Zimring.
Content: Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Romantic period to middle of 20th century. Enrollment preference given to English majors and minors.
Prerequisites: ENG 205 or consent of instructor.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 208 Prose Writing: Creative Nonfiction

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Writing in the genre known variously as the personal essay or narrative, memoir, autobiography, to introduce students to traditional and contemporary voices in this genre. Daily writing and weekly reading of exemplars such as Seneca, Plutarch, Montaigne, Hazlitt, Woolf, Soyinka, Baldwin, Walker, Hampl, Dillard, Selzer, Lopez.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 209 Introduction to American Literature

Faculty: Callahan, Cole, Fujie.
Content: Survey of major periods and issues in American literature, from the Puritan theocracy and early Republican period through American Romanticism and Modernism. Authors may include Edwards, Franklin, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Cather, Williams, Faulkner, Wright, Ellison.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 243 Women Writers

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Varies according to instructor. May focus on the common themes and patterns of influence in British, American, or international literature by women, or on close scrutiny of two or more authors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 244 Practicum

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Content: Literary Review (1 credit): Production of a first-rate literary review. In weekly workshops, students become familiar with all the processes involved (editorial, layout, printing, business, distribution) and develop advanced skills in at least one of these areas. May be taken four times for credit. Content: Peer Tutoring in Writing (2 credits): Designed for any student interested in learning theories and methods for teaching writing one-on-one; required of students interested in becoming tutors in the Writing Center. Content: Senior Poetry Broadsides (1 credit): A course of five evening sessions, resulting in a single-poem broadside written, designed, and printed by each student in the Advanced Poetry Workshop (ENG 401). The broadsides are featured at the Senior Poetry Reading at the end of the semester. Content: Watzek Archive (1-2 credits): Students engage in a variety of projects involving the Watzek Library Archives. A member of the Special Collections staff acts as supervisor. Interested students should contact Watzek Special Collections.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing and consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 1-2.

ENG 279 Classical Backgrounds

Faculty: Fosso, Gross.
Content: A study of epic, drama, and poetry from the Greek and Latin classics. Writers may include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Virgil, Horace, Ovid.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 280 The Medieval World

Faculty: Gross.
Content: An introduction to the world of the Middle Ages in Europe and in England. Exploration of the richness of the medieval experience through manuscripts, visual arts, music, architecture. May focus on a particular theme set by the instructor, including the cult of the saints; interactions among Christians, Jews, and Muslims; medieval cities; travel and pilgrimage; court culture; rural life; chivalry and romance; university culture and medieval education; popular devotional practices. Possible authors may include Chretien de Troyes, Marie de France, Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Julian of Norwich, Geoffrey Chaucer, William Langland, Ibn Battuta.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 300 Fiction Writing

Faculty: Toutonghi.
Content: Discussion and small-group workshop. Required reading aloud from an anthology, with student-led discussion of authors' texts. Daily exercises in various elements of short fiction, graduating to full-length stories; emphasis on revision. All students write evaluations of peers' work and participate in oral critique.
Prerequisites: ENG 200 or consent of instructor.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 301 Poetry Writing

Faculty: Szybist, Harp.
Content: Discussion of student work with occasional reference to work by earlier poets. Students develop skills as writers and readers of poetry.
Prerequisites: ENG 201 or consent of instructor.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 310 The Middle English Period

Faculty: Gross.
Content: Introduction to the major genres of English literature from the 13th through the 15th centuries. Political, social, historical, and religious contexts that affected the emergence of English as a literary language and that shaped the lyric, drama, narrative poetry, and prose writing of the period. Readings, all in Middle English, include "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight," "Pearl," William Langland's "Piers Plowman," Julian of Norwich's "Revelations," "The Book of Margery Kemp," "Sir Orfeo," "St. Erkenwald," Chaucer's "Troilus and Criseyde," and shorter poems, as well as selected plays, romances, lyrics, sermons, and tracts.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 311 Literature of the English Renaissance

Faculty: Asher.
Content: Developments in poetry, fiction, and drama during the Elizabethan period and the 17th century. Genres such as the sonnet and sonnet sequences, the pastoral, heroic and Ovidian verse, satire; examples from non-Shakespearean dramatists, comedy, tragedy. May include Browne, Donne, Herbert, Jonson, Marlowe, Marvell, Milton, Raleigh, Sidney, Spenser, Surrey, Wyatt.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 312 The Early English Novel

Faculty: Pritchard.
Content: The process by which, over the course of the 18th century, the novel became Britain's preeminent genre. Topics include the relation of novel to romance, debates over the morality of fiction, claims of novels not to be novels, women as readers and writers, and the period's various subgenres (e.g., epistolary novel, gothic novel, sentimental novel). Authors include Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Charlotte Lennox, Laurence Stern, Horace Walpole, Frances Burney, Jane Austen.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 313 Restoration and 18th-Century Literature

Faculty: Pritchard.
Content: An introduction to British literature written between 1660 and 1800 (i.e., between John Milton and Jane Austen). Covers the full range of the period's genres, except for the novel, and includes many of the period's major authors (John Bunyan, John Dryden, Aphra Behn, William Congreve, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, John Gay, Thomas Gray, Samuel Johnson). Topics include the tension between Puritanism and Libertinism, the relation of 18th-century authors to their classical forbears, the contrast between country and city, and the growth of England's empire.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 314 The Romantics

Faculty: Fosso.
Content: British writers circa 1785 to 1834, an era of "imagination" and "feeling" as well as of revolution, war, and social change. Authors may include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Austen, Keats, the Shelleys, Byron, Hemans.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 315 The Victorians

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Major Victorian writers and their responses to social and economic conditions. May include the Brontës, Eliot, Dickens, Nightingale, Hardy, Tennyson, Browning, Carlyle, Ruskin, Mill, Arnold, Gaskell, Mayhew, Gissing.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 316 20th-Century British Literature, Early

Faculty: Zimring.
Content: Major British and Irish writers of the first part of this century whose responses to such major events as World War I shape the conventions of 20th-century British literature, in particular modernism. Conrad, Yeats, Woolf, Joyce, Lawrence, Forster, Eliot, Auden, Rhys, Ford, Mansfield.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 317 20th-Century British Literature, Post-World War II

Faculty: Zimring.
Content: Survey of British fiction after World War II, covering such topics as fictional form (realism, fantasy, metafiction); class relations; national identity and multiculturalism; narratives of sexual identity; the politics of country/city representations; writers and social responsibility; youth, age, generations; subcultures; postwar British cinema. Authors include Graham Greene, Iris Murdoch, Ian McEwan, Martin Amis, Kazuo Ishiguro, A.S. Byatt, Jeanette Winterson.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 318 Modern Poetry

Faculty: Szybist.
Content: Significant modern British and American figures and more recent poets. May include Owen, Auden, Kavanagh, Williams, Stevens, Moore, Bishop, Roethke, Plath, Levertov.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 319 Postcolonial Literature: Anglophone Africa, India, Caribbean

Faculty: Zimring.
Content: Post-World War II literary works and essays exploring the literary and cultural issues raised by the collapse of the colonial world order. Western travel and primitivism; decolonization and national allegories; authenticity and the invention of tradition; immigrant dreams; constructions of race; women and the nation; adolescence and the novel of education. Rhys, Rushdie, Emecheta, Coetzee, Achebe, Ghosh.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 320 Early American Literature

Faculty: Cole.
Content: American literature in English from exploration and colonization through the beginning of the 19th century. Texts include autobiographies, sermons, captivity narratives, essays, poems, and novels. Topics include contemporary literary definitions of America (as land, a set of colonies, a nation, a culture, an ideology); the definition of American literature (What are our criteria of inclusion? How are those criteria conditioned by the structure of academic discourse?); how literature of the period imagines the relationships between European and indigenous populations; how it imagines the relationship of America to Europe; how it reflects variant ideologies (both religious and secular) within the colonies and later the republic; the significance of the tensions between these ideologies for concepts that remain current in American discourse today (the individual, the new world, freedom, agency, the frontier)
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 321 Pre-Civil War American Literature

Faculty: Cole.
Content: American literature in the decades preceding the Civil War. Texts include transcendentalist essays (Emerson, Fuller, Thoreau); adventure, romance, and protest novels (Hawthorne, Poe, Sedgwick, Stowe); short stories (Davis, Melville); poems (Dickinson, Whitman); and a slave narrative (Douglass). Topics include literary contributions to contemporary debates over religion, national expansion, national identity, slavery, and the rise of women and labor; the influence on those contributions of Puritanism and other early-American ideologies in combination with British Romanticism and 18th- and 19th-century philosophy; variant literary articulations of concepts that remain current in American discourse (the individual, freedom, law, the family, opportunity, happiness)
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 322 Post-Civil War American Literature

Faculty: Callahan, Cole.
Content: American literature as it reflects cultural and historical events such as reconstruction, industrialization, Western expansion, the women's rights movement. Aesthetic issues such as the rise of realism and naturalism. Cather, Chesnutt, Chopin, Crane, Douglass, Dreiser, DuBois, James, Jewett, Melville, Norris, Twain, Wharton.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 323 Modern American Literature, 1900 to World War II

Faculty: Callahan, Fujie.
Content: American literature in the first half of the 20th century as it is shaped by American writers' growing familiarity with European modernism, with the failure of Victorian values exposed by World War I, and with the increasing presence of women and minority writers. Anderson, Cather, Dos Passos, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Hurston, LeSueur, Stein, Steinbeck, Toomer, West, Wright.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 324 Modern American Literature, Post-World War II

Faculty: Callahan, Fujie.
Content: American literature in the second half of the 20th century as writers respond to such historical and cultural forces as the civil rights movement, the women's movement, the Vietnam War. Aesthetics of postmodernism and the breakdown and mingling of traditional literary genres. Baldwin, Barth, Bellow, Doctorow, Ellison, Erdrich, Lowell, Mailer, Morrison, O'Connor, Olsen, Plath, Salinger, Silko, Walker.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 326 African American Literature

Faculty: Callahan, Fujie.
Content: The African American literary tradition from the late 19th century to the present. Points of contact with, and departure from, the rest of American literary history with emphasis on the black oral tradition, particularly the pattern of call-and-response as writers adapt it to the literary forms of fiction and poetry from spirituals, work songs, blues, jazz, and storytelling. May include Baldwin, Baraka, Brooks, Brown, Chesnutt, Dove, DuBois, Dunbar, Ellison, Gaines, Harper, Hayden, Hughes, Hurston, Charles Johnson, James Weldon Johnson, Knight, Morrison, Toomer, Walker, Williams, Wilson, Wright.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 330 Chaucer

Faculty: Gross.
Content: The poetry of Chaucer in its literary, historical, social, and religious contexts. Topics may include the relationship between the sacred and the profane, the representations of men and women in 14th-century English society, the rise of the vernacular in the later Middle Ages, medieval attitudes towards poetry and authorship, the influence of continental European literary forms on English traditions, manuscript culture and ways of reading and writing before the advent of printing, the characteristics of different medieval literary genres, and the critical reception of Chaucer. Readings, predominantly from The Canterbury Tales, are in Middle English.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior Standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 331 Shakespeare: Early Works

Faculty: Asher.
Content: Critical reading of plays representative of the development of Shakespeare's comedies, histories, and tragedies. Usually covers six or seven plays and selected poetry, typically including The Merchant of Venice, All's Well That Ends Well, Twelfth Night, Henry IV, Hamlet, Othello.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 332 Shakespeare: Later Works

Faculty: Asher.
Content: Critical reading of plays representative of the development of Shakespeare's comedies, tragedies, romances. Usually covers six or seven plays and selected poetry from 1604 to 1611, typically including Measure for Measure, King Lear, Macbeth, Coriolanus, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter's Tale, The Tempest.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 333 Major Figures

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Detailed examination of writers introduced in other courses. Figures have included Austen, Blake, the Brontës, Ellison, Faulkner, Hemingway, Joyce, Woolf. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic; however, registration for subsequent sections must be done via the registrar's office.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 340 Topics in Literary Theory/Criticism

Faculty: Fosso, English Faculty.
Content: Emphasis on a particular topic in literary theory and criticism, to be chosen by the professor. Topics may include theories of meaning, literature and ethics, feminist literary theory, and theories of value. May be taken twice for credit with change of topic.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 401 Advanced Poetry Writing

Faculty: Szybist, Harp.
Content: An opportunity for experienced student writers to develop their skills as poets and to work on a sustained project. A workshop in which at least half of class time will be spent discussing student writing, with an emphasis on revision. Work will include the examination of literary models.
Prerequisites: ENG 301 or consent of instructor.
Restrictions: Senior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 402 Advanced Fiction Writing

Faculty: Toutonghi.
Content: Students complete a long project (a collection of short stories, a novella or the beginning of a novel, or some combination thereof). Workshop format plus additional reading as needed.
Prerequisites: ENG 200, ENG 300; or consent of instructor.
Restrictions: Senior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 444 Practicum

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Experience in editing, writing, and other aspects of publishing. Specifics vary depending on placement with a sponsoring publishing house, journal, or related enterprise. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually.
Semester credits: 1-4.

ENG 450 Senior Seminar

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Varies in focus and content. Subjects addressed in,the context of current critical discourse. Students write a long research-based paper.
Prerequisites: ENG 205, ENG 206, and two 300-level literature courses.
Restrictions: Senior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 490 Honors Thesis

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Independent research project, based upon revision of senior seminar paper, suitable for granting departmental honors. Details determined by student in conference with supervising faculty members.
Prerequisites: ENG 450 and permission of department to pursue honors.
Restrictions: Senior standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 499 Independent Study

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Opportunities for well-prepared students to design and pursue a substantive course of independent learning. Details determined by the student and the supervising instructor. 1-2 credits; 4 credits for New York Program. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing and consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 1-4.

The Major Program

Students are encouraged to declare the major early in the sophomore year. The department requires that students interested in an English major take ENG 205 and ENG 206 Major Periods and Issues in English Literature in the sophomore year, if possible, and no later than the junior year. During this sequence and in close consultation with an advisor, students should chart a program of study that will satisfy major requirements.

During the fall semester of their senior year, majors take the senior seminar. Though seminars vary in focus and content, each addresses its subject in the context of current critical discourse and requires students to write a long research-based paper. Each seminar gives students the experience of engaging in advanced research, developing independent critical perspectives, and sharing ideas with a small number of students in a seminar setting.

Within the major itself, students may shape their program in a number of ways. A concentration in writing and literature incorporates both creative writing courses and literature courses appropriate to a particular student's interest. A concentration in British and American literature combines courses calculated to strengthen the student's understanding of literary history and the major writers in British and American literature. These concentrations indicate two of the emphases possible within the English curriculum, though they are not intended as binding tracks. On the contrary, students are urged to work out a major concentration that best suits their individual interests and goals.

Major Requirements

A minimum of 40 semester credits (10 courses), including the following:

  • ENG 205 Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
  • ENG 206 Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
  • At least four courses at the 300 level or higher. Two must be in British literature before 1800 and one must be in American literature. When the subject matter is appropriate, ENG 333 may be applied to either requirement. Majors may apply either ENG 331 or ENG 332 to the British pre-1800 requirement, but not both.


British Literature Before 1800

ENG 310The Middle English Period
ENG 311Literature of the English Renaissance
ENG 312The Early English Novel
ENG 313Restoration and 18th-Century Literature
ENG 330Chaucer
ENG 331Shakespeare: Early Works
ENG 332Shakespeare: Later Works

American Literature

ENG 320Early American Literature
ENG 321Pre-Civil War American Literature
ENG 322Post-Civil War American Literature
ENG 323Modern American Literature, 1900 to World War II
ENG 324Modern American Literature, Post-World War II
ENG 326African American Literature

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 24 semester credits (six courses), including the following:

  • One departmental core course, chosen from the following:
    ENG 205Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
    ENG 206Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
  • Two 300-level literature courses.
  • Three elective English courses at any level, including creative writing courses.

Honors

Departmental honors will be awarded by the department to students who produce an outstanding senior thesis.

Students who have produced exceptional work in the senior seminar and who have earned a major GPA of 3.500 or above may be invited by their seminar professor to submit a detailed honors-thesis proposal, due near the start of spring semester. If the department approves an honors proposal, it selects a three-member committee to guide the writing and research. Each candidate for honors may then enroll in ENG 490 Honors Thesis (4 credits, non-major elective), and in early April submits the finished thesis to the department for approval. If the honors thesis is approved, the student presents a summary at a departmental forum.

Faculty

Lyell Asher. Associate professor of English. Renaissance English literature, Shakespeare. Ph.D. 1990, M.A. 1984 University of Virginia. B.A. 1980 Vanderbilt University.

John F. Callahan. Morgan S. Odell Professor of Humanities. Post-Civil War and 20th-century American literature, African American literature. Ph.D. 1970, M.A. 1964 University of Illinois. B.A. 1963 University of Connecticut.

Rachel Cole. Associate professor of English. 19th-century American literature. Ph.D. 2005, M.A. 2000 Johns Hopkins University. B.A 1994 Williams College.

Kurt Fosso. Associate professor of English. British romantic literature, critical theory. Ph.D. 1993, M.A. 1988 University of California at Irvine. B.A. 1987 University of Washington.

Kristin Fujie. Assistant professor of English. 19th- and 20th-century American literature, modernism. Ph.D. 2010, B.A. 1997 University of California at Berkeley.

Karen Gross. Associate professor of English. Medieval literature. Ph.D. 2005, M.A. 1999 Stanford University. M.Phil. 1998 University of Cambridge. B.A. 1997 University of Southern California.

Gerald Harp. Assistant professor with term of English and faculty fellow. Renaissance, 17th-century, poetry. Ph.D. 2002 University of Iowa, M.F.A. 1991 University of Florida, M.A. 1985 Saint Louis University, B.A. 1983 Saint Meinrad College.

Andrea Hibbard. Visiting assistant professor of English. Victorian literature and culture, law and literature, women's studies. Ph.D. 2000 University of Virginia. M.A. 1991 Georgetown University. B.A. 1986 Pomona College.

Michael Mirabile. Visiting assistant professor of humanities. Ph.D. 2002, M.Phil. 1998 Yale University. B.A. 1995 Queens College.

Will Pritchard. Associate professor of English, chair of the Department of English. Restoration and 18th-century literature. Ph.D. 1998, M.A. 1992 University of Chicago. B.A. 1986 Yale University.

Megan Pugh. Visiting assistant professor of English. Ph.D. 2012, M.A. 2010 University of California, Berkeley. B.A. 2004 Yale University.

Mary Szybist. Associate professor of English. Modern poetry, poetry writing. M.F.A. 1996 University of Iowa, M.T. 1994. B.A. 1992 University of Virginia.

Pauls Toutonghi. Associate professor of English. Fiction, expository writing, creative writing. Ph.D. 2006, M.A. 2002 Cornell University. B.A. 1999 Middlebury College.

Rishona Zimring. Professor of English. Modern British literature, postcolonial literature. Ph.D. 1993, B.A. 1985 Yale University.

Courses

ENG 100 Topics in Literature

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Emphasis on a particular theme or subgenre in literature to be chosen by the professor. Recent topics have included heroines in British fiction, literature and the environment, love and the novel, history of the lyric poem, and literature of immigration. May be taken twice for credit with change of topic.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 105 The Art of the Novel

Faculty: Asher.
Content: Major works in English, American, and European fiction, from the 17th century to the present. Goals include increasing awareness of the particular kinds of knowledge and perception that the novel makes available; considering the variety of ways in which novels braid moral and aesthetic concerns; understanding how novels respond both to everyday human experience and to previous literary history; and heightening appreciation for the range of pleasures that the novel can afford. Writers may include Cervantes, Sterne, Austen, Flaubert, Kafka, Woolf, Nabokov, Kundera, Pynchon.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 200 Introduction to Fiction and Fiction Writing

Faculty: Toutonghi.
Content: Class offers focused, writing-based exercises, coupled with careful reading of different types of fiction, to help build a student's understanding of the fictional form. Creative work is produced and read in a workshop-based environment.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 201 Introduction to Poetry and Poetry Writing

Faculty: Szybist, Harp, English Faculty.
Content: Elements of poetry such as imagery, rhythm, tone. Practice in the craft. Frequent references to earlier poets.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 205 Major Periods and Issues in English Literature

Faculty: Asher, Gross, Harp, Pritchard.
Content: Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Middle Ages to end of 17th century. Enrollment preference given to English majors and minors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 206 Major Periods and Issues in English Literature

Faculty: Cole, Fosso, Fujie, Zimring.
Content: Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Romantic period to middle of 20th century. Enrollment preference given to English majors and minors.
Prerequisites: ENG 205 or consent of instructor.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 208 Prose Writing: Creative Nonfiction

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Writing in the genre known variously as the personal essay or narrative, memoir, autobiography, to introduce students to traditional and contemporary voices in this genre. Daily writing and weekly reading of exemplars such as Seneca, Plutarch, Montaigne, Hazlitt, Woolf, Soyinka, Baldwin, Walker, Hampl, Dillard, Selzer, Lopez.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 209 Introduction to American Literature

Faculty: Callahan, Cole, Fujie.
Content: Survey of major periods and issues in American literature, from the Puritan theocracy and early Republican period through American Romanticism and Modernism. Authors may include Edwards, Franklin, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Cather, Williams, Faulkner, Wright, Ellison.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 243 Women Writers

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Varies according to instructor. May focus on the common themes and patterns of influence in British, American, or international literature by women, or on close scrutiny of two or more authors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 244 Practicum

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Content: Literary Review (1 credit): Production of a first-rate literary review. In weekly workshops, students become familiar with all the processes involved (editorial, layout, printing, business, distribution) and develop advanced skills in at least one of these areas. May be taken four times for credit. Content: Peer Tutoring in Writing (2 credits): Designed for any student interested in learning theories and methods for teaching writing one-on-one; required of students interested in becoming tutors in the Writing Center. Content: Senior Poetry Broadsides (1 credit): A course of five evening sessions, resulting in a single-poem broadside written, designed, and printed by each student in the Advanced Poetry Workshop (ENG 401). The broadsides are featured at the Senior Poetry Reading at the end of the semester. Content: Watzek Archive (1-2 credits): Students engage in a variety of projects involving the Watzek Library Archives. A member of the Special Collections staff acts as supervisor. Interested students should contact Watzek Special Collections.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing and consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 1-2.

ENG 279 Classical Backgrounds

Faculty: Fosso, Gross.
Content: A study of epic, drama, and poetry from the Greek and Latin classics. Writers may include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Virgil, Horace, Ovid.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 280 The Medieval World

Faculty: Gross.
Content: An introduction to the world of the Middle Ages in Europe and in England. Exploration of the richness of the medieval experience through manuscripts, visual arts, music, architecture. May focus on a particular theme set by the instructor, including the cult of the saints; interactions among Christians, Jews, and Muslims; medieval cities; travel and pilgrimage; court culture; rural life; chivalry and romance; university culture and medieval education; popular devotional practices. Possible authors may include Chretien de Troyes, Marie de France, Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Julian of Norwich, Geoffrey Chaucer, William Langland, Ibn Battuta.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required, unless section number is preceded by an "F."
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 300 Fiction Writing

Faculty: Toutonghi.
Content: Discussion and small-group workshop. Required reading aloud from an anthology, with student-led discussion of authors' texts. Daily exercises in various elements of short fiction, graduating to full-length stories; emphasis on revision. All students write evaluations of peers' work and participate in oral critique.
Prerequisites: ENG 200 or consent of instructor.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 301 Poetry Writing

Faculty: Szybist, Harp.
Content: Discussion of student work with occasional reference to work by earlier poets. Students develop skills as writers and readers of poetry.
Prerequisites: ENG 201 or consent of instructor.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 310 The Middle English Period

Faculty: Gross.
Content: Introduction to the major genres of English literature from the 13th through the 15th centuries. Political, social, historical, and religious contexts that affected the emergence of English as a literary language and that shaped the lyric, drama, narrative poetry, and prose writing of the period. Readings, all in Middle English, include "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight," "Pearl," William Langland's "Piers Plowman," Julian of Norwich's "Revelations," "The Book of Margery Kemp," "Sir Orfeo," "St. Erkenwald," Chaucer's "Troilus and Criseyde," and shorter poems, as well as selected plays, romances, lyrics, sermons, and tracts.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 311 Literature of the English Renaissance

Faculty: Asher.
Content: Developments in poetry, fiction, and drama during the Elizabethan period and the 17th century. Genres such as the sonnet and sonnet sequences, the pastoral, heroic and Ovidian verse, satire; examples from non-Shakespearean dramatists, comedy, tragedy. May include Browne, Donne, Herbert, Jonson, Marlowe, Marvell, Milton, Raleigh, Sidney, Spenser, Surrey, Wyatt.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 312 The Early English Novel

Faculty: Pritchard.
Content: The process by which, over the course of the 18th century, the novel became Britain's preeminent genre. Topics include the relation of novel to romance, debates over the morality of fiction, claims of novels not to be novels, women as readers and writers, and the period's various subgenres (e.g., epistolary novel, gothic novel, sentimental novel). Authors include Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Charlotte Lennox, Laurence Stern, Horace Walpole, Frances Burney, Jane Austen.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 313 Restoration and 18th-Century Literature

Faculty: Pritchard.
Content: An introduction to British literature written between 1660 and 1800 (i.e., between John Milton and Jane Austen). Covers the full range of the period's genres, except for the novel, and includes many of the period's major authors (John Bunyan, John Dryden, Aphra Behn, William Congreve, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, John Gay, Thomas Gray, Samuel Johnson). Topics include the tension between Puritanism and Libertinism, the relation of 18th-century authors to their classical forbears, the contrast between country and city, and the growth of England's empire.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 314 The Romantics

Faculty: Fosso.
Content: British writers circa 1785 to 1834, an era of "imagination" and "feeling" as well as of revolution, war, and social change. Authors may include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Austen, Keats, the Shelleys, Byron, Hemans.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 315 The Victorians

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Major Victorian writers and their responses to social and economic conditions. May include the Brontës, Eliot, Dickens, Nightingale, Hardy, Tennyson, Browning, Carlyle, Ruskin, Mill, Arnold, Gaskell, Mayhew, Gissing.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 316 20th-Century British Literature, Early

Faculty: Zimring.
Content: Major British and Irish writers of the first part of this century whose responses to such major events as World War I shape the conventions of 20th-century British literature, in particular modernism. Conrad, Yeats, Woolf, Joyce, Lawrence, Forster, Eliot, Auden, Rhys, Ford, Mansfield.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 317 20th-Century British Literature, Post-World War II

Faculty: Zimring.
Content: Survey of British fiction after World War II, covering such topics as fictional form (realism, fantasy, metafiction); class relations; national identity and multiculturalism; narratives of sexual identity; the politics of country/city representations; writers and social responsibility; youth, age, generations; subcultures; postwar British cinema. Authors include Graham Greene, Iris Murdoch, Ian McEwan, Martin Amis, Kazuo Ishiguro, A.S. Byatt, Jeanette Winterson.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 318 Modern Poetry

Faculty: Szybist.
Content: Significant modern British and American figures and more recent poets. May include Owen, Auden, Kavanagh, Williams, Stevens, Moore, Bishop, Roethke, Plath, Levertov.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 319 Postcolonial Literature: Anglophone Africa, India, Caribbean

Faculty: Zimring.
Content: Post-World War II literary works and essays exploring the literary and cultural issues raised by the collapse of the colonial world order. Western travel and primitivism; decolonization and national allegories; authenticity and the invention of tradition; immigrant dreams; constructions of race; women and the nation; adolescence and the novel of education. Rhys, Rushdie, Emecheta, Coetzee, Achebe, Ghosh.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 320 Early American Literature

Faculty: Cole.
Content: American literature in English from exploration and colonization through the beginning of the 19th century. Texts include autobiographies, sermons, captivity narratives, essays, poems, and novels. Topics include contemporary literary definitions of America (as land, a set of colonies, a nation, a culture, an ideology); the definition of American literature (What are our criteria of inclusion? How are those criteria conditioned by the structure of academic discourse?); how literature of the period imagines the relationships between European and indigenous populations; how it imagines the relationship of America to Europe; how it reflects variant ideologies (both religious and secular) within the colonies and later the republic; the significance of the tensions between these ideologies for concepts that remain current in American discourse today (the individual, the new world, freedom, agency, the frontier)
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 321 Pre-Civil War American Literature

Faculty: Cole.
Content: American literature in the decades preceding the Civil War. Texts include transcendentalist essays (Emerson, Fuller, Thoreau); adventure, romance, and protest novels (Hawthorne, Poe, Sedgwick, Stowe); short stories (Davis, Melville); poems (Dickinson, Whitman); and a slave narrative (Douglass). Topics include literary contributions to contemporary debates over religion, national expansion, national identity, slavery, and the rise of women and labor; the influence on those contributions of Puritanism and other early-American ideologies in combination with British Romanticism and 18th- and 19th-century philosophy; variant literary articulations of concepts that remain current in American discourse (the individual, freedom, law, the family, opportunity, happiness)
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 322 Post-Civil War American Literature

Faculty: Callahan, Cole.
Content: American literature as it reflects cultural and historical events such as reconstruction, industrialization, Western expansion, the women's rights movement. Aesthetic issues such as the rise of realism and naturalism. Cather, Chesnutt, Chopin, Crane, Douglass, Dreiser, DuBois, James, Jewett, Melville, Norris, Twain, Wharton.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 323 Modern American Literature, 1900 to World War II

Faculty: Callahan, Fujie.
Content: American literature in the first half of the 20th century as it is shaped by American writers' growing familiarity with European modernism, with the failure of Victorian values exposed by World War I, and with the increasing presence of women and minority writers. Anderson, Cather, Dos Passos, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Hurston, LeSueur, Stein, Steinbeck, Toomer, West, Wright.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 324 Modern American Literature, Post-World War II

Faculty: Callahan, Fujie.
Content: American literature in the second half of the 20th century as writers respond to such historical and cultural forces as the civil rights movement, the women's movement, the Vietnam War. Aesthetics of postmodernism and the breakdown and mingling of traditional literary genres. Baldwin, Barth, Bellow, Doctorow, Ellison, Erdrich, Lowell, Mailer, Morrison, O'Connor, Olsen, Plath, Salinger, Silko, Walker.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 326 African American Literature

Faculty: Callahan, Fujie.
Content: The African American literary tradition from the late 19th century to the present. Points of contact with, and departure from, the rest of American literary history with emphasis on the black oral tradition, particularly the pattern of call-and-response as writers adapt it to the literary forms of fiction and poetry from spirituals, work songs, blues, jazz, and storytelling. May include Baldwin, Baraka, Brooks, Brown, Chesnutt, Dove, DuBois, Dunbar, Ellison, Gaines, Harper, Hayden, Hughes, Hurston, Charles Johnson, James Weldon Johnson, Knight, Morrison, Toomer, Walker, Williams, Wilson, Wright.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 330 Chaucer

Faculty: Gross.
Content: The poetry of Chaucer in its literary, historical, social, and religious contexts. Topics may include the relationship between the sacred and the profane, the representations of men and women in 14th-century English society, the rise of the vernacular in the later Middle Ages, medieval attitudes towards poetry and authorship, the influence of continental European literary forms on English traditions, manuscript culture and ways of reading and writing before the advent of printing, the characteristics of different medieval literary genres, and the critical reception of Chaucer. Readings, predominantly from The Canterbury Tales, are in Middle English.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior Standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 331 Shakespeare: Early Works

Faculty: Asher.
Content: Critical reading of plays representative of the development of Shakespeare's comedies, histories, and tragedies. Usually covers six or seven plays and selected poetry, typically including The Merchant of Venice, All's Well That Ends Well, Twelfth Night, Henry IV, Hamlet, Othello.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 332 Shakespeare: Later Works

Faculty: Asher.
Content: Critical reading of plays representative of the development of Shakespeare's comedies, tragedies, romances. Usually covers six or seven plays and selected poetry from 1604 to 1611, typically including Measure for Measure, King Lear, Macbeth, Coriolanus, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter's Tale, The Tempest.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 333 Major Figures

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Detailed examination of writers introduced in other courses. Figures have included Austen, Blake, the Brontës, Ellison, Faulkner, Hemingway, Joyce, Woolf. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic; however, registration for subsequent sections must be done via the registrar's office.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 340 Topics in Literary Theory/Criticism

Faculty: Fosso, English Faculty.
Content: Emphasis on a particular topic in literary theory and criticism, to be chosen by the professor. Topics may include theories of meaning, literature and ethics, feminist literary theory, and theories of value. May be taken twice for credit with change of topic.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Alternate Years.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 401 Advanced Poetry Writing

Faculty: Szybist, Harp.
Content: An opportunity for experienced student writers to develop their skills as poets and to work on a sustained project. A workshop in which at least half of class time will be spent discussing student writing, with an emphasis on revision. Work will include the examination of literary models.
Prerequisites: ENG 301 or consent of instructor.
Restrictions: Senior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 402 Advanced Fiction Writing

Faculty: Toutonghi.
Content: Students complete a long project (a collection of short stories, a novella or the beginning of a novel, or some combination thereof). Workshop format plus additional reading as needed.
Prerequisites: ENG 200, ENG 300; or consent of instructor.
Restrictions: Senior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 444 Practicum

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Experience in editing, writing, and other aspects of publishing. Specifics vary depending on placement with a sponsoring publishing house, journal, or related enterprise. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually.
Semester credits: 1-4.

ENG 450 Senior Seminar

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Varies in focus and content. Subjects addressed in,the context of current critical discourse. Students write a long research-based paper.
Prerequisites: ENG 205, ENG 206, and two 300-level literature courses.
Restrictions: Senior standing or consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 490 Honors Thesis

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Independent research project, based upon revision of senior seminar paper, suitable for granting departmental honors. Details determined by student in conference with supervising faculty members.
Prerequisites: ENG 450 and permission of department to pursue honors.
Restrictions: Senior standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ENG 499 Independent Study

Faculty: English Faculty.
Content: Opportunities for well-prepared students to design and pursue a substantive course of independent learning. Details determined by the student and the supervising instructor. 1-2 credits; 4 credits for New York Program. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing and consent required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 1-4.

Faculty