Undergraduate Catalog

General Education Requirements

Lewis & Clark's General Education requirements consist of the Core course (Exploration and Discovery) and courses in the areas of international studies, scientific and quantitative reasoning, creative arts, foreign languages, and physical education/activity. In addition, content-area courses require students to demonstrate skills involving writing/rhetoric, bibliographic knowledge, and information/electronic competency.

Credit earned for independent study, practica, or internships may not fulfill General Education requirements.

International Studies

(8 semester credits)

To become educated citizens of an interdependent world, all Lewis & Clark students are expected to engage in a significant manner with a region of the world other than the United States through the study of historical experiences, cultural traditions, social and economic realities, and transnational issues. Students can meet this requirement in one of four ways:

  • By completing IS 240 and IS 241 on a Lewis & Clark overseas study program (8 semester credits).

  • By successfully completing 12 or more credits on a fall or spring semester Lewis & Clark overseas study program. 

  • By completing a total of 8 semester credits from a Lewis & Clark overseas study program in coursework dealing with the unique history and culture of the host country. If necessary, the registrar consults relevant departments to determine whether a particular course is applicable. Credits in language instruction do not apply.

  • By completing two courses (8 semester credits) on campus from courses listed below.
Art
ART 151History of Early East Asian Art
ART 154History of Buddhist Art
ART 207Pre-Columbian Art
ART 257Art of Late Imperial & Republican China
ART 355Art and Empire
Chinese
CHIN 230Introduction to Chinese Literature in Translation
CHIN 231Introduction to Chinese Literature in Translation
CHIN 290Topics in Chinese Literature in Translation
CHIN 291Topics in Chinese Literature in Translation
CHIN 410Advanced Readings in Chinese: Society and Culture
Classical Studies
CLAS 251History of Byzantium
CLAS 252Art and Archaeology of the Aegean
CLAS 253Attic Tragedy
CLAS 254Ancient Greek Myth and Religion
CLAS 255Sports, Games and Spectacles in the Greco-Roman World
CLAS 320Greek and Roman Epic
CLAS 324Roman Women
Economics
ECON 232Economic Development
ECON 314International Economics
English
ENG 319Postcolonial Literature: Anglophone Africa, India, Caribbean
Environmental Studies
ENVS 200Situating the Global Environment
French
FREN 230French Literature in Translation
FREN 330Francophone Literature
FREN 340French Literature and Society
FREN 350Topics in French and Francophone Literature
FREN 410Major Periods in French Literature
FREN 450Special Topics
Gender Studies
GEND 231Genders and Sexualities in Global Perspective
German Studies
GERM 230German Literature in Translation
GERM 350Topics in German Literature and Culture
GERM 410Major Periods in German Literature From the Beginning to Enlightenment
GERM 411Major Periods of German Literature From the Enlightenment to the Present
GERM 450Special Topics In German
History
HIST 110Early East Asian History
HIST 111Making Modern China
HIST 112Making Modern Japan
HIST 120Early European History
HIST 121Modern European History
HIST 141Colonial Latin American History
HIST 142Modern Latin American History
HIST 209Japan at War
HIST 210China's Golden Age (Tang and Song)
HIST 211Reform, Rebellion, and Revolution in Modern China
HIST 213Chinese History Through Biography
HIST 216Ancient Greece
HIST 217The Emergence of Modern South Asia
HIST 218Perspectives on the Vietnam War
HIST 219Ancient Rome: From Republic to Empire
HIST 221Tudor and Stuart Britain, 1485 to 1688
HIST 222Britain in the Age of Revolution, 1688 to 1815
HIST 224The Making of Modern Britain, 1815 to Present
HIST 225Europe in the Age of the French Revolution
HIST 22620th-Century Germany
HIST 227Medieval Europe, 800 to 1400
HIST 228Middle East in Modern Times
HIST 229The Holocaust in Comparative Perspective
HIST 242Borderlands: U.S.-Mexico Border, 16th Century to Present
HIST 259India in the Age of Empire
HIST 261Global Environmental History
HIST 288China in the News: Socio-Anthropological and Historical Perspective on Modern China
HIST 310China Discovers the West: Silk, Jesuits, Tea, Opium, and Milk
HIST 311History of Family, Gender, and Sexuality in China
HIST 313Religion, Society, and the State in Japanese History
HIST 316Popular Culture and Everyday Life in Japanese History
HIST 320Humanism in Renaissance Europe
HIST 323Modern European Intellectual History
HIST 325History of Islam in Europe
HIST 326History of Soviet Russia
HIST 328The British Empire
HIST 345Race and Nation in Latin America
HIST 347Modern Mexico: Culture, Politics, and Economic Crisis
HIST 348Modern Cuba
International Affairs

All courses, except IA 200, IA 244, IA 299, IA 444, IA 499

Japanese
JAPN 230Introduction to Japanese Literature in Translation
JAPN 231Introduction to Japanese Literature in Translation
JAPN 290Topics in Japanese Literature in Translation
JAPN 291Topics in Japanese Literature in Translation
JAPN 410Advanced Readings in Japanese: Society and Culture
Latin American Studies
LAS 200Latin American Cultural Studies
Music
MUS 105Introduction to World Music
MUS 106Workshops in World Music
MUS 136World Music: Asia
MUS 137World Music: Latin America
Philosophy
PHIL 201Philosophy of Religion
PHIL 207Indian Philosophy
PHIL 301Ancient Western Philosophy
Political Science
POLS 102Introduction to Comparative Politics
POLS 250Transitions to Democracy and Authoritarianism
POLS 314Russian Politics in Comparative Perspective
POLS 325European Politics
POLS 354Comparative Electoral Politics
Psychology
PSY 190Culture, Film, and Psychology
PSY 345Overseas Internship
PSY 390Cross-Cultural Psychology
Religious Studies
RELS 224Jewish Origins
RELS 225Christian Origins
RELS 241Religion and Culture of Hindu India
RELS 242Religions and Cultures of East Asia
RELS 243Buddhism: Theory, Culture, and Practice
RELS 251Medieval Christianity
RELS 262Judaism Encounters Modernity
RELS 273Islamic Origins
RELS 274Islam in the Modern World
RELS 354The Invention of Buddhist Literature
RELS 356Women in Buddhism
RELS 357Family, Gender, and Religion: Ethnographic Approaches
RELS 450Seminar: Social and Religious World of Early Judaism and Christianity
RELS 452Seminar in Asian Religions
Rhetoric and Media Studies
RHMS 340Media Across Cultures
Russian
RUSS 230Introduction to Russian Literature in Translation
RUSS 290Topics in Russian Literature and Culture in Translation
Sociology/Anthropology
SOAN 225Race and Ethnicity in Global Perspective
SOAN 261Gender and Sexuality in Latin America
SOAN 266Social Change in Latin America
SOAN 270Cultural Politics of Youth in East Asia
SOAN 274Chinese Culture Through Film
SOAN 275Africa in Social and Cultural Perspective
SOAN 280Gender in Asia
SOAN 281South Asian Cultures
SOAN 285Culture and Power in the Middle East
SOAN 288China in the News: Socio-Anthropological and Historical Perspective on Modern China
SOAN 349Indigenous Peoples: Identities and Politics
SOAN 350Global Inequality
SOAN 352Women in Developing Countries
SOAN 353Popular Culture/Public Protest: China
SOAN 355African Migration and Diaspora
SOAN 360Colonialism and Postcolonialism
SOAN 363Imagining the Nation: Culture and Identity in Nation-State Formation
SOAN 385International Migration
Spanish
SPAN 230Hispanic Literature in Translation
SPAN 440Topics in Hispanic Literatures
SPAN 450Special Topics in Spanish
Theatre
TH 251Theatre in London
TH 283Theatre and Society III: Modern Continental Drama
TH 381British Theatre and Drama: 19th Century to Present

Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning

(12 semester credits)

Just as liberally educated people have knowledge and appreciation of the humanities, creative arts, and social sciences, and have the ability to communicate clearly and effectively, they also have knowledge and appreciation of science and know how to reason scientifically and quantitatively. Therefore, a liberal education must include the study of mathematics and the natural sciences, and understanding of their methods of inquiry. Such understanding includes familiarity with the observational procedures employed by all the sciences: laboratory and field work; the theories and methods that constitute the tools and subject matter of scientific research; and the quantitative, qualitative, philosophical, social, and aesthetic dimensions of work in the natural and social sciences.

All graduates from Lewis & Clark are expected to have gained experience in quantitative reasoning, ranging from making rough quantitative estimates to solving word problems using algebra and logic, understanding graphically presented information, and using modern electronic devices such as calculators and computers. To foster this understanding and experience, Lewis & Clark students must complete at least two courses in natural science study and an additional course in quantitative reasoning.

A student can fulfill the scientific and quantitative reasoning requirement by taking at least one course that includes a laboratory component (selected from the Category A course list) and two courses that include a significant amount of mathematical and quantitative reasoning (at least one selected from Category B and the other selected from the Category B or C course lists).

Category A: Science Laboratory

All students must take one course.

To register for many Category A courses, the student must meet one of the following criteria: a) passing a mathematics proficiency examination administered during New Student Orientation or during the school year; b) receiving a score of 4 or 5 on an AP exam in calculus AB or BC, computer science, or statistics; c) receiving a score of 5, 6, or 7 on an International Baccalaureate higher-level or standard-level mathematics exam; d) successfully completing QR 101 and/or another prerequisite course. Some courses in this category have additional prerequisites. (See course descriptions.)

Biology
BIO 100Perspectives in Biology
BIO 107Field Paleontology of Oregon
BIO 114The Origins of Life in the Universe
BIO 115Explorations in Regional Biology
BIO 141Investigations in Ecology and Environmental Science
BIO 151Investigations in Genetics and Evolutionary Biology
BIO 200Investigations in Cell and Molecular Biology
BIO 211Land Vertebrates
BIO 212Invertebrate Zoology
BIO 221Marine Biology
BIO 223Plant Biology
 Chemistry
CHEM 100Perspectives in Environmental Chemistry
CHEM 105Perspectives in Nutrition
CHEM 110General Chemistry I
CHEM 114The Origins of Life in the Universe
CHEM 120General Chemistry II
CHEM 210Organic Chemistry I
CHEM 220Organic Chemistry II
Entrepreneurial Innovation
EINV 290Technologies of the Future
Geology
GEOL 114The Origins of Life in the Universe
GEOL 150Environmental Geology
GEOL 170Climate Science
GEOL 270Issues in Oceanography
GEOL 340Spatial Problems in Earth System Science
Physics
PHYS 114The Origins of Life in the Universe
PHYS 141Introductory General Physics I
PHYS 142Introductory General Physics II
PHYS 151Physics I: Motion
PHYS 152Physics II: Waves and Matter
PHYS 201Experimental Methods in the Physical Sciences

Category B: Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning: Sciences

All students must take one course, and may take two courses.

To register for Category B courses, the student must meet one of the following criteria: a) passing a mathematics proficiency examination administered during New Student Orientation or during the school year; b) receiving a score of 4 or 5 on an AP exam in calculus AB or BC, computer science, or statistics; c) receiving a score of 5, 6, or 7 on an International Baccalaureate higher-level or standard-level mathematics exam; d) successfully completing QR 101 and/or another prerequisite course. Some courses in this category have additional prerequisites. (See course descriptions.)

Biology
BIO 114The Origins of Life in the Universe
Chemistry
CHEM 100Perspectives in Environmental Chemistry
CHEM 110General Chemistry I
CHEM 114The Origins of Life in the Universe
CHEM 120General Chemistry II
Environmental Studies
ENVS 220Environmental Analysis
Geology
GEOL 114The Origins of Life in the Universe
GEOL 170Climate Science
GEOL 280The Fundamentals of Hydrology
Mathematical Sciences

All mathematics and computer science courses except CS 299, CS 499MATH 115, MATH 244MATH 281MATH 282, MATH 299, MATH 444, MATH 499 and QR 101.

Physics
PHYS 105Astronomy
PHYS 110Great Ideas in Physics
PHYS 114The Origins of Life in the Universe
PHYS 141Introductory General Physics I
PHYS 142Introductory General Physics II
PHYS 151Physics I: Motion
PHYS 152Physics II: Waves and Matter
PHYS 205Deep Space Astronomy
PHYS 251Physics III: Electromagnetism
PHYS 252Physics IV: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics

Category C: Quantitative Reasoning: Humanities and Social Sciences

Students may take one course.

To register for many Category C courses, the student must meet one of the following criteria: a) passing a mathematics proficiency examination administered during New Student Orientation or during the school year; b) receiving a score of 4 or 5 on an AP exam in calculus AB or BC, computer science, or statistics; c) receiving a score of 5, 6, or 7 on an International Baccalaureate higher-level or standard-level mathematics exam; d) successfully completing QR 101 or another prerequisite course. Some courses in this category have additional prerequisites. (See course descriptions.)

Economics
ECON 100Principles of Economics
ECON 103Statistics
ECON 215Game Theory
Philosophy
PHIL 101Logic
Political Science
POLS 201Research Methods in Political Science
POLS 252Public Opinion and Survey Research
Psychology
PSY 200Statistics I
PSY 300Psychology Methodology
PSY 311Statistics II
Rhetoric and Media Studies
RHMS 260Empirical Research Methods
Sociology/Anthropology
SOAN 201Quantitative Research Methods

So that mathematical and natural science students acquire a breadth of understanding of the sciences as a whole, they are expected to take the Category A and B requirements from disciplines outside their major department. Also, students are encouraged to take a third course in Category C to broaden their horizons.

Creative Arts

(4 semester credits)

The distinctive element of the creative arts lies in the creative process itself—the mobilization of often nonverbal, intuitive, and emotional resources in providing new understandings about and insights into human existence. The practice and study of the creative arts can increase students' appreciation of the artistry of others, and stimulate and enhance learning of all kinds. Students at Lewis & Clark should therefore acquire, as part of their general education, an appreciation for and understanding of this unique way of knowing and experiencing the world.

Students can fulfill the creative arts requirement either by engaging in the creative process itself through courses in studio art such as ceramics, design, pottery, or drawing; in artistic performance (music, dance, theatre, creative writing); or by the historical and theoretical study of artistic production, including, where possible, a studio component. In recognition of the importance of arts in our culture, students are encouraged to explore a broad range of courses in the arts. Courses that may be applied toward the creative arts requirement are listed below.

Students majoring in the creative arts must satisfy this requirement outside their majors.

Students can meet the requirement by taking one beginning and one advanced-technique course in the same area, so long as the student earns a total of 4 semester credits.

Art

All courses except ART 244, ART 299, ART 444, ART 490, ART 499.

Classics
CLAS 252Art and Archaeology of the Aegean
CLAS 253Attic Tragedy
East Asian Studies
EAS 156The Art of Tea in Japanese Culture I
English
ENG 200Introduction to Fiction and Fiction Writing
ENG 201Introduction to Poetry and Poetry Writing
ENG 208Prose Writing: Creative Nonfiction
ENG 300Fiction Writing
ENG 301Poetry Writing
Gender Studies
GEND 300Gender and Aesthetic Expression
Music

All courses except MUP 299MUP 499, MUS 244, MUS 299, MUS 444, MUS 499.

Philosophy
PHIL 203Philosophy of Art and Beauty
Theatre
TH 106Fundamentals of Movement
TH 107Ballet I
TH 108Contemporary Dance Forms I
TH 113Acting I: Fundamentals
TH 208Contemporary Dance Forms II
TH 213Acting II, Realism
TH 214Dance in Context: History and Criticism
TH 218Fundamentals of Design
TH 220Theatre Graphics
TH 234Stage Lighting
TH 249Oregon Shakespeare Festival
TH 250Theatre in New York
TH 251Theatre in London
TH 275Introduction to Playwriting
TH 281Theatre and Society I: Classical and Medieval Drama
TH 282Theatre and Society II: Renaissance, Neoclassical, and Romantic Drama
TH 283Theatre and Society III: Modern Continental Drama
TH 308Dance Composition and Improvisation
TH 313Acting III, Style
TH 350Dance and Performance
TH 351Rehearsal and Performance: Main Stage Production
TH 381British Theatre and Drama: 19th Century to Present
TH 382American Theatre and Drama: 19th Century to Present

Foreign Language

(proficiency requirement)

The acquisition of a language other than one's own has always been a hallmark of a liberal education, and it's all the more important in today's increasingly interdependent world. Only by learning the language of another people is one able to adequately understand their subtleties and nuances, for language is the gateway to all cultures.

At Lewis & Clark in particular, studying a second language has a place of central importance—both because of Lewis & Clark's historical commitment to international studies and because providing all students with an encounter with another culture has become a defining feature of the undergraduate program of studies. Not only does language study open up our appreciation for and sensitivity to other parts of the world, it also better enables us to understand and appreciate our own native language. For these reasons, Lewis & Clark requires of its students the serious study of at least one language other than English.

Lewis & Clark has a foreign language proficiency requirement for all students. A student can satisfy this requirement in any of the following ways:

  • By completing study of a foreign language through the 201 level.

  • By completing an approved language-based overseas program. (The list of approved programs is available from the Office of Overseas and Off-Campus Programs.)

  • By placing into 202 or above on the foreign language placement examination.

  • By earning a score of 4 or 5 on an Advanced Placement language or literature exam; or a score of 5, 6, or 7 on an International Baccalaureate higher-level language exam.

International students whose first language is not English are exempt from the foreign language requirement.

Physical Education/Activity

(two semester courses)

Physical education is one facet of a total educational program that stresses the interrelationship and interdependence among the physical, mental, and social dimensions of human experience. Therefore, students are required to take a minimum of two semester courses during their degree program that engage them in physical exercise. In these courses, students are encouraged to recognize the importance of physical activity as a lifelong pursuit.

Physical Education and Athletics courses that may be counted toward this requirement are

PE/A 101Activities
PE/A 102Varsity Athletics
PE/A 141Wilderness First Responder
PE/A 142Wilderness Leadership

Theatre dance courses that may be counted toward this requirement are

TH 106Fundamentals of Movement
TH 107Ballet I
TH 108Contemporary Dance Forms I
TH 208Contemporary Dance Forms II
TH 252Rehearsal and Performance: Dance Extravaganza
TH 308Dance Composition and Improvisation
TH 350Dance and Performance

Theatre courses counting toward this requirement may be taken credit-no credit.

Music performance courses that may be counted toward this requirement are

MUP 150Beginning Ghanaian Music and Dance Ensemble

Students may register for no more than one 101 course per semester, except in the summer semester when one course may be taken each session. The maximum credit in Activities (PE/A 101), Varsity Athletics (PE/A 102), Wilderness First Responder (PE/A 141), and Wilderness Leadership (PE/A 142) courses that may be applied toward the 128 credits required for graduation is 4 semester credits.

Library Use, Bibliographic Instruction, and Information/Electronic Competency

Information literacy means having the ability to locate, acquire, analyze, synthesize, and structure information. This includes the ability to understand the variety of contents and formats of information; to understand systems for organizing information; to retrieve information; and to evaluate, organize, and manipulate information. As students complete content courses in all academic departments, they also learn to locate and apply information available in libraries, in electronic databases, and on the Internet. Students also work with a variety of computer software appropriate to their academic fields and interests.

Exploration and Discovery

(8 semester credits)

Exploration and Discovery, a two-semester requirement for all first-year students, provides a substantially common experience. This innovative, yearlong course seeks to ground students in humanity's enduring questions and to model the intellect's journey outward from these questions into today's diverse world of ideas. Primary and secondary sources, small-class discussion, and keynote lectures forge a shared intellectual culture between professors and students, who together analyze works and topics of lasting significance in the liberal arts tradition. Exploration and Discovery thereby provides students with a vital foundation for developing the informed and complex perspectives they will need in our changing modern world.

The course offers students numerous opportunities to develop and hone their skills in critical thinking, reading and writing, effective speaking and listening, and conducting independent research. Students advance their strength and confidence as writers of college-level work through regular practice, constructive feedback from faculty and peers, and opportunities to revise and polish their work. They also develop as speakers in command of rhetorical choices and strategies as they learn to converse persuasively and present ideas with some formality in front of a group as well as informally in class discussion. Class sessions are structured to foster thoughtful and articulate discussion of key texts and central ideas of the course.

For further details, see the course descriptions in Core.

Core Requirements

Students must complete the Core requirement in their first two semesters at Lewis & Clark. Students normally may not withdraw from this course. Students who fail to successfully complete a Core course, are allowed to withdraw from a Core course, or are approved to take a leave of absence during a semester in which taking Core would be required must take/retake the Core course the next semester it is offered and they are in attendance. If the student has junior or senior standing, he or she must instead complete a course chosen from the approved list of Core substitutes. This course must be taken during the same semester in which the student would have been required to take the Core course.

No student is allowed to participate in an overseas or off-campus program until the Core requirements have been completed.

Any course used to fulfill a Core requirement may not be applied toward the fulfillment of any other General Education or major or minor requirement.

Transfer Students

Students transferring to Lewis & Clark in the fall with fewer than 16 semester credits* must take Exploration and Discovery—CORE 106 and CORE 107—in their first year. Those who enter in January must take CORE 107 in the spring semester and CORE 106 the following fall.

All transfer students with at least 16 but fewer than 29 semester credits*, of which 3 or more credits are from an approved writing-intensive course, must take either CORE 106 or CORE 107 in one of their first two semesters at Lewis & Clark. In those cases where a student has received no such transferable credit, both CORE 106 and CORE 107 are required in the first two semesters.

Students who transfer to Lewis & Clark with 29 or more credits* must satisfy the CORE 106-CORE 107 requirement either by transferring approved writing-intensive courses or by taking two courses from the approved writing-intensive course list by the end of their second semester at Lewis & Clark.

Transferred courses and Lewis & Clark's writing-intensive courses used to satisfy the CORE 106-CORE 107 requirement may not be used to satisfy any other General Education or major or minor requirement.

Core Substitute Courses (for transfer students who meet the criteria)
Classical Studies
CLAS 200Introduction to Classical Studies
CLAS 450Topics in Classical Studies
English
ENG 100Topics in Literature
ENG 105The Art of the Novel
ENG 209Introduction to American Literature
ENG 243Women Writers
ENG 279Classical Backgrounds
ENG 280The Medieval World
ENG 310The Middle English Period
ENG 319Postcolonial Literature: Anglophone Africa, India, Caribbean
ENG 326African American Literature
Foreign Languages
CHIN 230Introduction to Chinese Literature in Translation
CHIN 290Topics in Chinese Literature in Translation
FREN 230French Literature in Translation
GERM 230German Literature in Translation
JAPN 230Introduction to Japanese Literature in Translation
JAPN 290Topics in Japanese Literature in Translation
RUSS 230Introduction to Russian Literature in Translation
RUSS 290Topics in Russian Literature and Culture in Translation
SPAN 230Hispanic Literature in Translation
History
HIST 235History of the Pacific Northwest
HIST 310China Discovers the West: Silk, Jesuits, Tea, Opium, and Milk
HIST 311History of Family, Gender, and Sexuality in China
HIST 313Religion, Society, and the State in Japanese History
HIST 316Popular Culture and Everyday Life in Japanese History
HIST 320Humanism in Renaissance Europe
HIST 324Saints and Bureaucrats
HIST 331American Culture and Society: 1880 to 1980
HIST 335History and Culture of American Indians
HIST 336Wilderness and the American West
Music
MUS 361Music and Language
Philosophy
PHIL 102Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 103Ethics
PHIL 201Philosophy of Religion
PHIL 203Philosophy of Art and Beauty
PHIL 214Philosophy of Law
PHIL 215Philosophy and the Environment
PHIL 301Ancient Western Philosophy
PHIL 302Early Modern Philosophy
PHIL 30319th-Century Philosophy
PHIL 307Recent Continental Philosophy
Political Science
POLS 102Introduction to Comparative Politics
POLS 103Introduction to American Politics
POLS 252Public Opinion and Survey Research
POLS 310Pillars of Western Political Thought: Plato to Machiavelli
POLS 311Pillars of Western Political Thought: Hobbes to Foucault
Religious Studies
RELS 241Religion and Culture of Hindu India
RELS 242Religions and Cultures of East Asia
RELS 243Buddhism: Theory, Culture, and Practice
RELS 354The Invention of Buddhist Literature
RELS 355Sufism: Islamic Mysticism
RELS 373Reformations of the 16th Century
Sociology and Anthropology
SOAN 221Sociology of Work, Leisure, and Consumption
SOAN 222City and Society
SOAN 225Race and Ethnicity in Global Perspective
SOAN 226Law and Society
SOAN 245Visual Anthropology
SOAN 251Myth, Ritual, and Symbol
SOAN 261Gender and Sexuality in Latin America
SOAN 266Social Change in Latin America
SOAN 281South Asian Cultures
SOAN 285Culture and Power in the Middle East
Theatre
TH 281Theatre and Society I: Classical and Medieval Drama
TH 282Theatre and Society II: Renaissance, Neoclassical, and Romantic Drama
TH 283Theatre and Society III: Modern Continental Drama

 


*Advanced standing (e.g., AP and IB) credit excluded.