Undergraduate Catalog

Entrepreneurial Innovation

Kenneth H. Pierce Faculty Fellow and Director of the Bates Center for Entrepreneurship and Leadership: Samir Parikh (fall 2018)
Director of the Bates Center for Entrepreneurship and Leadership: TBD (spring 2019)

Lewis & Clark’s Bates Center for Entrepreneurship and Leadership is a creative hub that invites students, faculty, alumni, mentors, and influential professionals into meaningful collaborations. Our entrepreneurial students have a passion for innovation and strive to be intellectual leaders. To help them in this endeavor, the Center offers a host of academic and extracurricular activities that enable students to identify problems, invent solutions, and realize the real-world impact of a liberal arts education.

Faculty

Kellar Autumn. Professor of biology. Physiology, biomechanics, evolution of animal locomotion. PhD 1995 University of California at Berkeley. BA 1988 University of California at Santa Cruz.

Brian Detweiler-Bedell. Professor of psychology. Social psychology, statistics. PhD 2001, MPhil 2000, MS 1998 Yale University. MA 1995, BA 1994 Stanford University.

Michael Olich. Associate professor of theatre. Design. MFA 1975 Carnegie Mellon University. BA 1973 St. Patrick’s College.

Samir Parikh. Professor of law, Kenneth H. Pierce Faculty Fellow, director of the Bates Center for Entrepreneurship. Banking law and regulation, bankruptcy, business associations. JD 2001 University of Michigan. BBA 1997 University of Miami.

Bryan R. Sebok. Associate professor of rhetoric and media studies, chair of the Department of Rhetoric and Media Studies. Communication technology and society, film and video aesthetic theory and methods, media organizations. PhD 2007 University of Texas at Austin. MA 2002 Emory University. BA 1999 North Carolina State University.

Amelia J. Wilcox. Assistant professor with term of psychology. PhD 1992 California School of Professional Psychology. MS 1986 Dominican College. BA 1981 Lewis & Clark College.

Courses

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EINV 201 Cases in Entrepreneurial Thinking & Practice

Content: Case-based introduction to key principles of entrepreneurial thinking and practice. Entrepreneurship and innovation are presented as a process of creative problem-solving and value creation that individuals and organizations have successfully applied to a wide variety of markets and social and institutional challenges. Students will be introduced to the case method, and case analysis will be used to understand how entrepreneurs reframe problems, recognize opportunities, and create value by implementing and sustaining their innovative solutions.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 2.

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EINV 211 Introduction to Curatorial Affairs in the Visual Arts

Content: Introduction and examination of issues surrounding the role of an art curator. With emphasis on field trips, guest speakers, reading assignments, and group discussion, seminar participants will encounter a variety of curatorial experiences, from registrarial work and conservation to public art processes, museum design, electronic curating in "virtual space," and art criticism. Students will meet and interact with professionals in the Portland metropolitan area who are involved in the business of art.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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EINV 241 Implementing Innovation 1

Content: Lecture and practicum in the fundamentals of entrepreneurial activity, taught in partnership with outside experts. Course covers finance, marketing, and operational and revenue models used by for-profit and nonprofit enterprises. Students will employ and become conversant in these skills of entrepreneurial thinking and design.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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EINV 242 Implementing Innovation 2

Content: Opportunity to further analyze foundational issues addressed in Implementing Innovation I, including recognizing opportunity, assessing customer need, identifying viable business models and markets, developing marketing strategies, and designing for-profit and nonprofit ventures. Students will complete an internship with a company in a selected industry. Students are to submit a statement affirming their ability to participate in an off-campus internship; instructor consent required.
Prerequisites: EINV 241.
Restrictions: Sophmore standing required. Students will need to secure transportation to off-campus internships.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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EINV 244 Internship/Practicum

Content: Opportunities for students to engage in experiential learning by applying entrepreneurial thinking and academic concepts within for-profit and nonprofit organizations. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 1-4.

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EINV 250 Introduction to Intellectual Property: Exploring Intangible Stuff

Content: Introduces students to the various forms of intellectual property, exploring copyrights, trademarks, patents, and trade secrets broadly through the lens of business and the entrepreneurial approach, and specifically through the strategies employed by certain industries. Students will choose or be assigned to one of four groups representing four prevalent Oregon industries (apparel, software, food and beverage, and video games), reaching out to and interviewing companies within these categories. The students will learn and teach each other about intellectual property in their chosen industries over the course of the semester.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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EINV 260 Sustainability & Entrepreneurship

Content: Introduction to current trends in efforts to address the environmental, social, and economic challenges of the 21st century. How for-profit and nonprofit entities--and innovative hybrids of the two--have begun to address modern problems and needs by supplying goods and services in new ways; the role of government in promoting sustainability through both traditional regulation and more innovative approaches; how market-dependent mechanisms such as product labels, private and public certification schemes, and investment and divestment strategies affect consumer behavior and public policy. A number of guest speakers will participate in classes over the course of the semester.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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EINV 261 Leadership: Teams & Innovation

Content: Theories, research, and models of effective (as well as failed) leadership and teamwork. Students will complete a number of experiential projects to evaluate and develop their own leadership and teamwork skills. Leaders from corporate, startup, and nonprofit organizations will periodically join the class to discuss their experiences.
Prerequisites: EINV 201 or EINV 241.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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EINV 270 Design Thinking: Principles in Practice

Content: Exploration of the often messy and unpredictable process of developing solutions to user-focused problems. Students will work collaboratively within a project-based format to explore the rigors of innovative problem-solving. Topics range from entrepreneurial approaches to value creation and social transformation; course includes a weekly two-hour lab session and provides a distinctively subjective, student-centered learning opportunity through immersion in need-identification, ideation, and uncompromising experimentation.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophmore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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EINV 280 Communicating a Vision: Messaging for Impact

Content: Examines existing best practices in verbal communication, creative expression, and audio-visual presentation and production. Students will apply these practices in a series of exercises focused on individual and group communication, developing the ability to employ entrepreneurial thinking and principles to communicate innovative ideas to a variety of audiences. Projects include public speaking exercises, written and oral presentations tailored to different audiences, and audio-visual advertising and promotional content production. Case studies will be used to examine successful marketing campaigns for innovative products and services as well as alternative strategies and failures. We will emphasize habits and barriers to effective communication, strategies that promote creative expression, and how entrepreneurial methods empower successful messaging.
Prerequisites: EINV 201 or EINV 241.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

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EINV 290 Technologies of the Future

Content: Through lectures, assigned readings, and hands-on activities, students learn about the parallel and synergistic processes of scientific discovery and engineering innovation. Open-ended projects give students experience in mutualistic teaming, technology transfer, product development, and marketing, as well as opportunities to learn and apply methods inherent in effectual entrepreneurial activities. Team-based laboratory projects focus on the process of technology transfer (utilizing scientific research in commercial product development).
Prerequisites: EINV 201 or EINV 241.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 5.