Graduate Catalog

ESOL Endorsement

Designed for educators holding an Oregon teaching license, Lewis & Clark's ESOL Endorsement Program explores the principles, theories, research, and practices relevant to the needs of PK-12 students acquiring English as a second or additional language. To meet the needs of professionals, we offer program courses in the evenings, on weekends, during the summer, on-line and, in some cases, at school sites. Candidates join colleagues and Lewis & Clark faculty to engage in classes for dialogue, study, and field experiences that address the full complexity of cultural and linguistic diversity and of academic and social inclusion of immigrant students.

Graduates of Lewis & Clark's ESOL Endorsement Program enter schools prepared to:

  • Support their students' English language development through content and literature studies as well as direct language instruction.

  • Develop and adapt content-specific curriculum for diverse classroom populations.

  • Employ innovative teaching methodologies and instructional strategies that respond to the needs of English learners in the mainstream classroom and beyond.

  • Utilize assessment principles that measure language and content.

  • Partner with families to build strong ties between the school and the diverse racial, cultural, and linguistic communities they serve.

  • Lead their school community in the establishment of collaborative learning environments that support high levels of success for English learners and ensure justice for students and for their families.

The program may be completed in conjunction with either the MEd in Curriculum and Instruction or the Teacher Leadership for Equity and Social Justice Certificate.

Applying for the Endorsement

Candidates must apply for an endorsement directly to the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) by submitting the appropriate forms, fees, test scores, and transcripts. Applicants must apply for the endorsement within three years following completion of their respective programs. If more than three years elapse before application is made, the candidate must qualify for recommendation under rules for licensure in effect at the time of application. Information about filing for a license is available from Lewis & Clark's K-12 Educational Career and Licensing Services Office.

Adding the Optional Bilingual Specialization

Please contact the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission for the requirements and process to add an optional Bilingual Specialization to your existing teaching license.

Accreditation

Lewis & Clark's graduate programs leading to licensure and endorsements are approved under the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC).

ESOL Endorsement

There are two pathways for students interested in completing the requirements for an Oregon TSPC-approved ESOL endorsement.

Track I

Track I is for those who hold regular, non-restricted Oregon teaching licenses and who are currently working in schools as licensed teachers. The Track I ESOL endorsement may be completed in conjunction with either the MEd in Curriculum and Instruction or the Teacher Leadership for Equity and Social Justice Certificate.

Track I Endorsement Requirements

14 semester hours, distributed as follows, and all required tests:

Track I Required Courses
ESOL 500/​ESOL 600Historical and Legal Foundations of Educating ESOL Students3
ESOL 501/​ESOL 601Strategies and Materials for Teaching Content and English Language Development to ESOL Students3
ESOL 502/​ESOL 602Focus on Culture and Community in Teaching ESOL Students3
ESOL 505/​ESOL 605ESOL Practicum (Elementary - Multiple Subjects)2
or ESOL 506/​ESOL 606 ESOL Practicum (Secondary)
ESOL 507/​ESOL 607Language Acquisition and Development3

Track II

Track II is open only to Lewis & Clark teacher education preservice MAT students who are currently enrolled in or who have completed the MAT program.

Track II Endorsement Requirements

A minimum of 14 semester hours, distributed as follows, and all required tests:

Track II Required Courses
ESOL 540Culturally Responsive Teaching in Linguistically Diverse Classrooms2
ESOL 501AStrategies for Teaching Content & Language to ESOL Students I1
ESOL 501BStrategies for Teaching Content & Language to ESOL Students II1
ESOL 501CStrategies for Teaching Content & Language to ESOL Students III1
ESOL 507/​ESOL 607Language Acquisition and Development3
ESOL 500/​ESOL 600Historical and Legal Foundations of Educating ESOL Students3
ESOL 505/​ESOL 605ESOL Practicum (Elementary - Multiple Subjects)2
or ESOL 506/​ESOL 606 ESOL Practicum (Secondary)
ESOL 541The Role of Community in Support of ESOL Students1

Track I Courses

Note: The following courses are offered on campus, off campus, and online. Each course listed below has an off-campus equivalent with a 600-level number. You can find the full list of all courses on the Department of Education courses page in this catalog.

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ESOL 500 Historical and Legal Foundations of Educating ESOL Students

Content: Examination of the history of trends and attitudes toward immigrants and learners of English as a second language. Topics include the psychological, social, and political characteristics of bilingualism and biculturalism in the United States and abroad. ESOL teaching is considered in light of laws, research findings, and second-language acquisition theory. Explores the distinction between language difference and disabilities and provides an overview of legal issues pertaining to second-language learners and special and gifted education students. Also provides critical reading of research-based programs, English-language proficiency standards, and standardized test measures. Ensures that educators are not only able to plan and implement programs designed for the optimal learning of all students, but also gives educators the tools to advocate for equity in their schools and school communities.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ESOL 501 Strategies and Materials for Teaching Content and English Language Development to ESOL Students

Content: How and whys of content-learning approaches such as sheltered English, integrated language teaching, applications of language experience, whole language, and cooperative learning for second-language learners. Provides grounding in the relationship between first- and second-language literacy, oral language proficiency, and culturally responsive reading comprehension. Explores materials, literacy teaching approaches, classroom organization, formal and alternative assessment measures, technology integration, and the alignment of curriculum models with English-language proficiency levels. Participants critically examine curriculum models, community resources, and content in relation to student experience.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ESOL 502 Focus on Culture and Community in Teaching ESOL Students

Content: Understanding the student within the context of his or her environment. The first part of the course focuses on cultural factors that influence learning and their implications for instruction. The latter part of the course examines the involvement of significant individuals in a child's academic programs and explores barriers to family involvement. Introduces cross-cultural pre-referral screening tools for gifted and special-needs English-language learners. Participants develop strategies for establishing positive school, family, and community partnerships and explore tools for combating racism and bias in schools.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ESOL 505 ESOL Practicum (Elementary - Multiple Subjects)

Content: Apprenticeship to a mentor who works in a classroom that requires the ESOL endorsement. Practicum may be conducted in a variety of classrooms, such as English as a Second Language (ESL), bilingual, or English Language Development (ELD). Practicum interns work with individuals as well as small and large groups to practice teaching students who are acquiring English as a second language. As part of the practicum, candidates are assigned an on-site mentor and a university supervisor. Candidates are observed teaching two ELD/ESL lessons and two sheltered content lessons.
Prerequisites: ESOL 501A
Credits: 0.5-2 semester hours.

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ESOL 506 ESOL Practicum (Secondary)

Content: Apprenticeship to a mentor who works in a classroom that requires the ESOL endorsement. Practicum may be conducted in a variety of classrooms, such as English as a Second Language (ESL), bilingual, or English Language Development (ELD). Practicum interns work with individuals as well as small and large groups to practice teaching students who are acquiring English as a second language. As part of the practicum, candidates are assigned an on-site mentor and a university supervisor. Candidates are observed teaching two ELD/ESL lessons and two sheltered content lessons.
Prerequisites: ESOL 501A
Credits: 0.5-2 semester hours.

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ESOL 507 Language Acquisition and Development

Content: Theories of how first and second languages (written and spoken) are acquired, the importance of first-language development and its relationship to the acquisition of other languages, and the relationship of language to cognitive development. Understanding of these issues is used to promote a school environment that honors diverse perspectives and maximizes language learning potential and ensures respect for communities whose languages or varieties of English differ from standard school English. Required for the Reading Interventionist and ESOL endorsements. The initial course in the Reading Interventionist Endorsement sequence and recommended preparation for other language arts offerings.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

Track II Courses

Note: ESOL 540 is embedded in the MAT program and is offered on campus only. The rest of the courses are offered on-campus, off-campus, and online. Each course listed below has an off-campus equivalent with a 600-level number. You can find the full list of all courses (on campus and off) on the Department of Education courses page in this catalog.

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ESOL 500 Historical and Legal Foundations of Educating ESOL Students

Content: Examination of the history of trends and attitudes toward immigrants and learners of English as a second language. Topics include the psychological, social, and political characteristics of bilingualism and biculturalism in the United States and abroad. ESOL teaching is considered in light of laws, research findings, and second-language acquisition theory. Explores the distinction between language difference and disabilities and provides an overview of legal issues pertaining to second-language learners and special and gifted education students. Also provides critical reading of research-based programs, English-language proficiency standards, and standardized test measures. Ensures that educators are not only able to plan and implement programs designed for the optimal learning of all students, but also gives educators the tools to advocate for equity in their schools and school communities.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ESOL 501A Strategies for Teaching Content & Language to ESOL Students I

Content: This course is designed to prepare future ESOL endorsed teachers for meeting the linguistic and academic needs of English Language Learners. The course will provide a review of language acquisition theory and an overview of approaches to Sheltered Instruction and English Language Development. Candidates will learn how to identify and use appropriate second language assessment tools, create language objectives and content objective, scaffold content for ELLs, integrate technology, and design lessons that target various levels of language proficiency. There is emphasis on the relationship between first- and second-language literacy, oral language proficiency, and culturally responsive reading comprehension. Participants critically examine curriculum models in relation to student experience.
Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: For MESOL candidates.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ESOL 501B Strategies for Teaching Content & Language to ESOL Students II

Content: This course is designed to prepare future ESOL endorsed teachers for meeting the linguistic and academic needs of English Language Learners. It builds on content from ESOL 501A. The course will provide a review of language acquisition theory and an overview of approaches to Sheltered Instruction and English Language Development. Candidates will learn how to identify and use appropriate second language assessment tools, create language objectives and content objective, scaffold content for ELLs, integrate technology, and design lessons that target various levels of language proficiency. There is emphasis on the relationship between first- and second-language literacy, oral language proficiency, and culturally responsive reading comprehension. Participants critically examine curriculum models in relation to student experience.
Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: For MESOL candidates
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ESOL 501C Strategies for Teaching Content & Language to ESOL Students III

Content: This course is designed to prepare future ESOL endorsed teachers for meeting the linguistic and academic needs of English Language Learners. This course builds on content from ESOL 501A B. The course will provide a review of language acquisition theory and an overview of approaches to Sheltered Instruction and English Language Development. Candidates will learn how to identify and use appropriate second language assessment tools, create language objectives and content objective, scaffold content for ELLs, integrate technology, and design lessons that target various levels of language proficiency. There is emphasis on the relationship between first- and second-language literacy, oral language proficiency, and culturally responsive reading comprehension. Participants critically examine curriculum models in relation to student experience.
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 1 semester hour.

Print This Course

ESOL 505 ESOL Practicum (Elementary - Multiple Subjects)

Content: Apprenticeship to a mentor who works in a classroom that requires the ESOL endorsement. Practicum may be conducted in a variety of classrooms, such as English as a Second Language (ESL), bilingual, or English Language Development (ELD). Practicum interns work with individuals as well as small and large groups to practice teaching students who are acquiring English as a second language. As part of the practicum, candidates are assigned an on-site mentor and a university supervisor. Candidates are observed teaching two ELD/ESL lessons and two sheltered content lessons.
Prerequisites: ESOL 501A
Credits: 0.5-2 semester hours.

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ESOL 506 ESOL Practicum (Secondary)

Content: Apprenticeship to a mentor who works in a classroom that requires the ESOL endorsement. Practicum may be conducted in a variety of classrooms, such as English as a Second Language (ESL), bilingual, or English Language Development (ELD). Practicum interns work with individuals as well as small and large groups to practice teaching students who are acquiring English as a second language. As part of the practicum, candidates are assigned an on-site mentor and a university supervisor. Candidates are observed teaching two ELD/ESL lessons and two sheltered content lessons.
Prerequisites: ESOL 501A
Credits: 0.5-2 semester hours.

Print This Course

ESOL 507 Language Acquisition and Development

Content: Theories of how first and second languages (written and spoken) are acquired, the importance of first-language development and its relationship to the acquisition of other languages, and the relationship of language to cognitive development. Understanding of these issues is used to promote a school environment that honors diverse perspectives and maximizes language learning potential and ensures respect for communities whose languages or varieties of English differ from standard school English. Required for the Reading Interventionist and ESOL endorsements. The initial course in the Reading Interventionist Endorsement sequence and recommended preparation for other language arts offerings.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ESOL 540 Culturally Responsive Teaching in Linguistically Diverse Classrooms

Content: This course focuses on using culturally responsive classroom practices to engage learners whose first and/or home language is not English. We will explore how the candidate’s culture and race intersect with learning and teaching. Course content centers on key elements impacting teaching and learning, including race, culture, and language, which will be examined through the lens of classroom practice, school engagement, and community resources that support and build upon student and family assets. Candidates develop strategies to work with significant people in the child's environment in order to support and encourage success in schools. Candidates examine barriers to family involvement and learn strategies to encourage the development of positive working relationships between home and school. Topics for readings and discussion include, race, socio-economics, language, social and cultural capital, language, and immigration.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to a preservice teacher education program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ESOL 541 The Role of Community in Support of ESOL Students

Content: This course builds on the initial work the candidate did in ESOL 540. The focus is on understanding the student within the context of his/her environment. Candidates develop strategies for working with significant persons in a child's environment to encourage success. Candidates examine barriers to family involvement and learn strategies to encourage the development of positive working relationships between home and school. Candidates explore topics related to language, culture, and immigration. Candidates reflect on their own culturally responsive teaching practices.
Prerequisites: ESOL-540
Credits: 1 semester hour.

Testing Requirements

The following test must be passed prior to the first field placement in the Lewis & Clark ESOL endorsement program:

The following test must be passed in order to be eligible for a recommendation by Lewis & Clark for the ESOL endorsement in any state. Information regarding the point in the program by which this test must be passed is provided in consultation with your faculty advisor. The required test is: 

(Test scores from the ORELA: ESOL test will be accepted if taken and passed from September 1, 2009 – September 1, 2012 or from the PRAXIS II: Teaching ESL test (#20360) if taken and passed prior to September 1, 2009.)

Students may view completed tests, including scores, by logging into their WebAdvisor account.