Graduate Catalog

Educational Leadership Doctoral Program

The Lewis & Clark Educational Leadership program is a cohort-based doctoral program designed to develop scholar-practitioners who can transform educational systems through rich inquiry into persistent and pressing inequities. We aim to promote equity and social justice through the integration of theory, research, policy, and practice as candidates work to solve authentic educational problems. The program’s social justice lens and P-20 focus are distinctive within the realm of EdD programs across the country, affording students the unique opportunity to engage the P-20 pipeline and to learn how educational pathways from pre-K/K to the significant transition into higher education play an evolving and ongoing role in educational outcomes.

Six focal themes guide program coursework:

  • Transformative leadership and institutional change
  • Social justice, equity, and critical foundations of education
  • Human relations, adult development, and learning
  • Educational policy and politics
  • Community engagement and collaboration
  • Research and evaluation

Working collaboratively with peers and faculty members, candidates gain the knowledge and skills to understand how power and politics operate in educational settings and to inquire about and take action to redress injustice. Through a series of core P-20 leadership courses, methods courses, PK-12 or HESA concentration courses, and a culminating dissertation, students will develop as scholar-practitioners prepared to:

  1. Apply inquiry and research skills to surface and disrupt historical and structural inequalities in their contexts and across the educational pipeline.

  2. Employ transformative, culturally responsive, democratic, and inclusive leadership practices at the individual and organizational levels to create fairness in opportunities and outcomes for those who have been historically marginalized within the educational system.

The program's structure allows professionals to complete this academically rigorous terminal degree while maintaining full-time employment.

Accreditation

Lewis & Clark's educational administration and leadership programs are approved by the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) for educational leadership preparation programs.

Doctor of Education in Leadership, PK-12 Concentration

The Doctor of Education in Leadership, PK-12 Concentration, consists of 60 semester hours. Up to 14 hours of post-master's work can be applied toward this total at the time of admission. Students who do not have 14 semester hours of post-master's coursework to transfer must meet with the EdD program director to plan a course of study for the elective requirements.

The coursework portion of the 46-semester-hour cohort program takes two summers and four semesters (two calendar years) to complete. During their two years of coursework, students are guided in the preparation of a dissertation proposal focused on an issue of practice relevant to the promotion of social justice and equity. Most students complete and defend their dissertations by the end of the fourth year. To meet the requirements for advancement to degree candidacy, participants must successfully complete all coursework and successfully defend a completed dissertation proposal.

Students who already hold a Principal License and who wish to obtain the Professional Administrator License may qualify for a waiver from the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) if they successfully complete their doctoral degree program. If granted, the student would not have to enroll in an advanced institutional Professional Administrator License Program or be assessed for advanced competencies. Candidates apply directly to TPSC for the Professional Administrator License, independent of any recommendation from Lewis & Clark. For more information, contact the office of K-12 Career and Licensing Services.

Degree Requirements

Completion and defense of a dissertation
60 semester hours (up to 14 hours may be transferred), 46 of which should be distributed as follows:

Required Degree Courses
EDLL 702Organizational Theory and Leadership2
EDLL 708Ethics and Leadership for Social Justice2
EDLL 780Social Justice Leadership Retreat1
EDLL 726Seminar in Scholarship and Writing2
EDLL 710Introduction to Educational Research2
EDLL 731Equity-Focused Policy and Practice2
EDLL 701History of Leadership in Education2
EDLL 716Critical Theory and Pedagogy2
EDLL 735Pasar La Batuta: Success Through Intention2
EDLL 725Leadership in a Changing Global Society1
EDLL 727Focused Literature Research1
EDLL 741AQualitative Research Methods2
EDLL 741BQuantitative Research Methods2
EDLL 709Adult Development and Learning2
EDLL 728Conceptual Framework 2
EDLL 742Quantitative Research Methods II1
EDLL 729Dissertation Design3
EDLL 743Qualitative Research Methods II1
EDLL 744Research Development and Dissemination2
EDLL 750Doctoral Dissertation (To be taken in summer, fall, and spring of the third year. Each instance carries 4 units of graduate credit, for a total of 12 upon completion.)12

Students who have not advanced to doctoral degree candidacy by the third summer of their program must complete Advancement to Candidacy Seminar (EDLL 730)

Elective Courses

Any remaining required semester hours may be earned by taking elective courses. Students who intend to apply for the Professional Administrator License should complete School Finance and District Budgeting (EDAD 556) as one of their elective courses.

Doctor of Education in Leadership, Higher Education Student Affairs Concentration (HESA)

The Higher Education Student Affairs (HESA) concentration is designed to serve working professionals who want to further their understanding of and leadership impact within colleges and universities, with a focus on equity and social justice across the P-20 pipeline. The program’s social justice lens and P-20 focus are distinctive within the realm of EdD programs across the country. Although social justice may be a part of the content of individual courses at other institutions with EdD programs in higher education and student affairs administration, none of these institutions offers formalized social justice-focused curricula. Our programmatic approach affords students the unique opportunity to engage the P-20 pipeline, learning how educational pathways from pre-K/K to the significant transition into higher education play an evolving and ongoing role in educational outcomes. The HESA concentration courses simultaneously build students’ theoretical, empirical, and practical knowledge in critical areas specific to higher education including governance, finance, student development, policy, global issues, and law.

HESA Degree Requirements

Completion and defense of a dissertation.
60 semester hours, distributed as follows:

EDLL 701History of Leadership in Education2
EDLL 702Organizational Theory and Leadership2
EDLL 708Ethics and Leadership for Social Justice2
EDLL 710Introduction to Educational Research2
EDLL 716Critical Theory and Pedagogy2
EDLL 721Legal Issues in Higher Ed3
EDLL 726Seminar in Scholarship and Writing2
EDLL 727Focused Literature Research2
EDLL 728Conceptual Framework 2
EDLL 729Dissertation Design3
EDLL 732Higher Education Policy3
EDLL 735Pasar La Batuta: Success Through Intention2
EDLL 741AQualitative Research Methods2
EDLL 741BQuantitative Research Methods2
EDLL 742Quantitative Research Methods II1
EDLL 743Qualitative Research Methods II1
EDLL 744Research Development and Dissemination2
EDLL 750Doctoral Dissertation (To be taken in summer, fall, and spring of the third year. Each instance carries 4 units of graduate credit, for a total of 12 upon completion.)12
EDLL 780Social Justice Leadership Retreat1
EDLL 798Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses3
SAA 523Higher Education Governance and Administration3
SAA 525Higher Education Finance3
SAA 541Student Development Theory II3

Students wanting additional writing support OR students who have not defended their dissertation proposals may take EDLL 730 Advancement to Candidacy Seminar upon completion of EDLL 729 Dissertation Design and prior to Advancing to Candidacy and enrolling in EDLL 750 Doctoral Dissertation. Students are still required to take 12 credits of EDLL 750 in order to complete the program.

HESA Advanced Track Degree Requirements

Students who hold a MA in Student Affairs Administration may be eligible for the 50 semester hour HESA Advanced Track. Eligibility is determined by faculty during the admissions process. Requirements include:

Completion and defense of a dissertation.
50 semester hours, distributed as follows:

EDLL 701History of Leadership in Education2
EDLL 702Organizational Theory and Leadership2
EDLL 708Ethics and Leadership for Social Justice2
EDLL 710Introduction to Educational Research2
EDLL 716Critical Theory and Pedagogy2
EDLL 721Legal Issues in Higher Ed3
EDLL 726Seminar in Scholarship and Writing2
EDLL 727Focused Literature Research2
EDLL 728Conceptual Framework 2
EDLL 729Dissertation Design3
EDLL 732Higher Education Policy3
EDLL 735Pasar La Batuta: Success Through Intention2
EDLL 741AQualitative Research Methods2
EDLL 741BQuantitative Research Methods2
EDLL 742Quantitative Research Methods II1
EDLL 780Social Justice Leadership Retreat1
EDLL 743Qualitative Research Methods II1
EDLL 744Research Development and Dissemination2
EDLL 750Doctoral Dissertation (To be taken summer, fall, and spring of the third year. Each instance carries 4 units of graduate credit, for a total of 12 upon completion.)12
EDLL 798Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses2

Students wanting additional writing support OR students who have not defended their dissertation proposals may take EDLL 730 Advancement to Candidacy Seminar upon completion of EDLL 729 Dissertation Design and prior to Advancing to Candidacy and enrolling in EDLL 750 Doctoral Dissertation. Students are still required to take 12 credits of EDLL 750 in order to complete the program.

Educational Specialist in Advanced Leadership

The Educational Specialist in Advanced Leadership degree offers a unique opportunity for Lewis & Clark doctoral students who have successfully completed doctoral coursework yet do not plan to complete the Doctor of Education in Leadership degree. This post-master's degree is only available to Lewis & Clark educational leadership doctoral students, who must complete a "Change of Program" application to be admitted to the EdS degree program (form can be obtained from the graduate school's registrar's office). Students with doctoral work from other institutions may not apply for this degree program.

Coursework accumulated in the Lewis & Clark doctoral program will be accepted for the educational specialist degree. The program director will assess a student's transcript of applicable doctoral coursework to identify at least 36 hours of work (of the possible 46 hours of doctoral coursework, excluding dissertation hours). Courses offered at the time the student entered the program will be taken into consideration for degree credit, as will courses selected from the 14 elective credits. (Students should review the official course planning sheets for each cohort.)

A capstone/culminating written and oral project will require students to synthesize and integrate their learning over time into a written report and public demonstration. For this project, students will register for 1-2 semester hours of EDLL 799 Independent Study, which must be completed within one semester.

Degree Requirements

A minimum of 37 semester hours, distributed as follows:

Required Courses

36 semester hours of coursework from the Doctor of Education in Leadership Program

EDLL 799Independent Study (Capstone Project)1
Earning the Professional Administrator License

Students who successfully complete the requirements of the Ed.S. degree program may also become eligible for a Professional Administrator License by completing the following:

  1. EDAD 556 School Finance and District Budgeting, in Strand Three (Effective Management), of the Professional Administrator License Program
  2. EDAD 549 Professional Mentorship and Seminar

Educational Leadership Courses

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EDLL 701 History of Leadership in Education

Content: In 1837, Horace Mann said, "A nation could not long remain ignorant and free." Mann argued for universal public education, supported by tax funds. The major questions of the day: Who is to be educated? Who will teach them? What will they learn? These have since been answered many times over. In the 21st century we are raising those questions again, and inquiring further to ask: Is postsecondary education also a public good? Who gets to access a college education? What dictates a quality higher education experience? Explore how leadership, organization, and ethical and political issues relate to these fundamental questions, which are the bedrock of America’s systems of education.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to EdD program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 702 Organizational Theory and Leadership

Content: This course introduces students to core concepts of organizational theory relevant to a large range of organizations e.g., PK-12 schools, colleges and universities, community groups, manufacturing businesses, hospitals) as well as organizational issues confronting leaders (e.g., design, improvement, accountability). Students will become adept at thinking critically and analytically about the organizational contexts in which they work. The course will also help students new to doctoral-level research learn how to interact with scholarly literature and apply it usefully to their work.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 704 Culturally Responsive Leadership

Content: Provides theoretical and practical guidance to support candidates in enacting culturally relevant approaches to leadership. Explores how policies and practices can enable effective interactions within culturally diverse environments. Participants will learn how to analyze their values, beliefs, and behavior in this context and will reflect on their own cultural awareness and critical consciousness.
Prerequisites: None.
Corequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 708 Ethics and Leadership for Social Justice

Content: Leaders face opportunities and challenges when implementing policies and practices regarding equity and social justice. Explore ethical issues dealing with leadership, governance, and policy development pertaining to P-20 institutions. Develop an understanding of social justice leadership theory and practice designed to disrupt structural inequities and produce fairness in organizational conditions and outcomes for minoritized communities.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 709 Adult Development and Learning

Content: Understanding how people and organizations develop and learn is centrally important for organizational leaders, whether learning is about existing or new knowledge. In this course students will explore a variety of theories related to adult learning including transformational learning, critical and feminist theories, distributed cognition, and social practice theory. Students will apply these theories to their own experiences as learners, and to learning in the organizational settings in which they work.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 710 Introduction to Educational Research

Content: Introduction to epistemologies, paradigms, and methodologies in social science research. Students learn about different approaches used in education research and examine their underlying assumptions and values. The course addresses and critiques some of the long-standing traditions in education and social science research that have privileged certain values and viewpoints while marginalizing others. Students will read and critique a variety of education research articles and consider how education leaders can use research for advocacy and transformative social action.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 715 Intercultural Community Collaboration

Content: Building collaborative relationships between schools and the diverse families and communities they serve is critical. By analyzing nontraditional forms of parent and guardian involvement and learning to work with existing cultural traditions, education leaders will gain skills to support diverse students and strengthen community connections. The goal is to build on the diverse assets of families and to connect with valuable local resources in order to strengthen collaborative learning for the entire school community.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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EDLL 716 Critical Theory and Pedagogy

Content: Education research sits at the intersection of debates about the philosophy of education (ontology), the role of education in (re)producing a pluralistic and free democracy (critical theories of education) what counts as a “just” society (critical social theory), what counts as knowledge production/construction (critical epistemology and critical research design), and ultimately what it means to educate a public (critical pedagogy). Therefore, education research focused on any one of these areas has implications in all of these areas. For education research focused on problems of (in)justice, with an interest in solving these problems, critical theory offers intellectual traditions and analytic tools. Using these intellectual tools, students will recognize, understand, discuss and apply the historical and current tenants of critical theory to form your own emerging conceptual framework for explaining and describing problems of practice in leadership and policy, organizing, pedagogy, and education research.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to doctoral program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 721 Legal Issues in Higher Ed

Content: This course is designed to advance students' understanding and navigation of legal issues in higher education. Issues related to the various constituents - faculty, staff, students, and administration - and in various institutional settings will be discussed and considered in the context of leadership in the face of these challenges. Starting from a broader perspective, students will explore the current legal issues facing the higher education community nationally, and move to more local contexts for managing these circumstances as an institutional administrator at a college or university. From both the national and local viewpoints, the primary focus will be on the law and how it impacts relationships with students. The course will explore the increasingly complex regulatory environment facing colleges and universities. Specific topics of discussion will include (among others): the rights and responsibilities of students in and outside the classroom; codes of conduct and due process; freedom of expression; freedom from discrimination; affirmative action; the roles of religion and politics in higher education; and the regulation of intercollegiate athletics.
Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Admission to EdD program or instructor approval
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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EDLL 725 Leadership in a Changing Global Society

Content: In this course we will explore education systems around the globe and the influences of globalization on education practices. Students will consider the interdependence of social, political, economic, and cultural phenomena within and across local and global social systems including education systems.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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EDLL 726 Seminar in Scholarship and Writing

Content: Introduction to scholarly writing and the development of self-as-scholar in education and the social sciences. Students gain an understanding of the elements and processes of scholarly writing. The course also provides training in APA style and library and reference resources.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 727 Focused Literature Research

Content: This seminar is designed to prepare students to develop a critical review of pertinent academic literature focused on the problem or problems that will be addressed in their dissertation research. The seminar will provide instruction and support with the processes and techniques for scholarly discussion of controversial literature, and students will receive feedback on academic writing from the course instructor.
Prerequisites: EDLL 726
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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EDLL 728 Conceptual Framework

Content: Students will learn to generate clear, coherent, well-grounded conceptual frameworks and apply them to their work as emerging researcher-practitioners. Students will read and critique a variety of conceptual frameworks as well as collaboratively generate conceptual frameworks based on course readings. They will begin to develop a conceptual framework particular to their own practice and research interests.
Prerequisites: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 729 Dissertation Design

Content: Students will learn the acceptable formats, techniques, and approaches necessary for producing a defensible doctoral dissertation as well as the purpose and process of applying for permission to conduct studies involving human subjects. Students will complete a draft dissertation proposal and a human subjects research institutional review board (IRB) application, as well as understand their responsibilities to their dissertation committee.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to the Ed.D program or consent of program director.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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EDLL 730 Advancement to Candidacy Seminar

Content: Extends time and support for doctoral students to complete advancement to candidacy and institutional review board (IRB) process. Provides individualized coaching and writing assistance and allows students to work toward finalization of their dissertation proposal under faculty supervision while maintaining access to college services through continuous enrollment in the doctoral program.
Prerequisites: Completion of all doctoral coursework, excluding EDLL 729 and EDLL 750.
Restrictions: Admission to doctoral program. Students may register for a maximum of 3 consecutive semesters of EDLL 730 beginning in the third summer of their program.
Credits: 1-3 semester hours.

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EDLL 731 Equity-Focused Policy and Practice

Content: This course focuses on equity policy in education. Students will explore the sources of policy ideas, the processes of policy making, and the complex relationship between policy design and policy implementation. Students will read and critique equity-focused policies and learn to assess the strengths and constraints in policy designs using a variety of analysis approaches. Students will also read and critique policy implementation research.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 732 Higher Education Policy

Content: The purpose of this course is to critically examine higher education policy and the impacts of policy application. Class discussions will explore challenges faced by institutions of higher education in implementing policy, with a particular focus on issues related to access, affordability and student outcomes.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Restrictions: Admission to the EdD program or approval of instructor
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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EDLL 733 Educational Leadership Field Experience

Content: Provides authentic, in-situ opportunities for candidates to synthesize and apply theory and research to their leadership development and growth as practitioner-scholars. In concert with their dissertation work and in collaboration with a university and field supervisor, candidates spend sustained time in the field gathering and analyzing data around a pressing problem of practice. Through their field experiences, candidates are expected to: (1) identify and engage with the key contact points and people within their schools, districts, organizations, and/or communities in ways that facilitate robust and ethical data gathering; (2) explore how dissertation data and findings illuminate critical questions and themes in leadership work, and (3) make recommendations for improving leadership practice and spurring organizational change.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 734 Educational Leadership Field Experience II

Content: Provides authentic, sustained, in-situ opportunities for candidates to synthesize and apply theory and research from program coursework to their development as practitioner-scholars. In concert with the doctoral program mission, candidates’ field experiences center on the practice of transformative social change in educational settings, through research and inquiry. The experiences are designed to support candidates in two critical phases of their dissertation work, including formulating and articulating a problem (year 1) and applying methodologies to explore and understand a problem of practice (year 3). Field experiences are planned and guided collaboratively by the Lewis Clark supervisors and school, district, and agency personnel for graduate credit. They culminate in a presentation at the end of the program, where candidates share what they have learned about leadership and organizational change through the practicum process.
Prerequisites: EDLL 733.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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EDLL 735 Pasar La Batuta: Success Through Intention

Content: When participating in a track and field relay race, it is important that each of the sprinters speedily covers their portion of the race. Equally important is the fluidity of transferring responsibility from one runner to the next, the critical passing of the baton, or "pasar la batuta". It is in this moment when all of the effort given by one runner helps jump start their teammate in a seamless fashion, or when the work is abruptly halted because the hand off is faulty. This critical transfer can define the outcome of the race. The analogy of "pasar la batuta" well articulates the responsibility educational leaders in P-12 and higher education settings have for fashioning a seamless transition for students to navigate. As it stands, the movement between primary and secondary education into postsecondary education is disjointed. This course will explore why the transition across the educational pipeline is choppy, what factors need to be considered in order to facilitate a smoother move, and the opportunities for leaders to foster that change.
Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Admission to doctoral program or approval of instructor
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 741A Qualitative Research Methods

Content: Overview and application of qualitative research methods. Through course readings, discussion, and practical application, candidates explore: (1) different approaches in qualitative research and epistemologies and common theoretical perspectives that undergird qualitative inquiry, and (2) various methods and techniques for gathering, interpreting, and making meaning of in-depth and rich information about things as they occur in their natural settings. Candidates gain the skills necessary to review and critique qualitative research and to design and undertake their own qualitative research.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 741B Quantitative Research Methods

Content: Overview and application of quantitative research methods. Through course readings, discussion, and practical application, we examine basic designs and methods associated with quantitative research and become acquainted with descriptive and inferential statistical analyses and relevant analysis software, as well as learn how to interpret and present statistical findings. Candidates gain the skills necessary to review and critique quantitative research and to design and undertake their own quantitative research.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 742 Quantitative Research Methods II

Content: Practice quantitative research skills. Through reading, discussion, and four practicum workshops students will practice: (1) designing researchable quantitative questions; (2) collecting quantitative data; (3) cleaning and structuring data for analysis; (4) conducting descriptive and inferential statistical analyses; and (5) writing up results in APA style.
Prerequisites: EDLL 741B
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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EDLL 743 Qualitative Research Methods II

Content: Students practice foundational skills necessary for conducting qualitative research. Through reading, discussion, and four practicum workshops students will practice qualitative research skills: (1) collecting observation field notes; (2) developing and piloting interview and/or focus group questions; (3) collecting and managing audio and video recorded data; (4) transcribing audio and/or video data; (5) developing and using analytic coding. Students will also be introduced to the human subjects review process and complete the CITI responsible research module and the human subjects module.
Prerequisites: EDLL 741A
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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EDLL 744 Research Development and Dissemination

Content: A core element of becoming a scholar-practitioner is learning to conduct, complete and disseminate one's research. In this course candidates gain skills and practice developing and delivering research presentations and writing conference proposals. Candidates attend research presentations, develop a conference proposal, and give and get critical feedback on presentations and proposals of their original research projects in professional and community-based settings.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Restrictions: Admission to the EdD or consent of instructor
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 750 Doctoral Dissertation

Content: Completion of dissertation research under the direction of the chair of the candidate's dissertation committee. Candidates must be enrolled in this course during the term in which they defend their dissertations, and must complete at least 12 semester hours of EDLL 750. Grades are deferred until the candidate has successfully defended and uploaded the final edited and approved dissertation.
Prerequisites: Advancement to candidacy, and successful defense of a dissertation proposal.
Restrictions: Admission to EdD program
Credits: 1-12 semester hours.

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EDLL 780 Social Justice Leadership Retreat

Content: Leaders of school communities and agencies must be able to work effectively with individuals and groups representing diverse cultures and backgrounds; these skills are at the core of leading and serving all members of the community. This retreat will provide an opportunity to explore and learn about issues of diversity in a mutually supportive environment led by trained diversity facilitator(s). The retreat builds experientially on the academic emphasis on social justice and equity threaded through the doctoral program curriculum and leads to a practical application component during the ensuing academic year.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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EDLL 798 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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EDLL 799 Independent Study

Content: This course is an Independent Study course. Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for Independent Study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of Independent Study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-3 semester hours.

Higher Education Student Affairs Courses

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SAA 523 Higher Education Governance and Administration

Content: This course introduces students to governance and administrative structures in American higher education. Students will explore how changes in the demographic, legal, financial, and social landscape have impacted the ways that colleges and universities operate. Students will also become familiarized with the use of data and research as it relates to governance and administration.
Prerequisites: SAA 501, SAA 509.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SAA 525 Higher Education Finance

Content: This three-semester hour course introduces students to financial, economic, and budgetary issues within Higher Education with particular emphasis on student affairs. Students will review the primary political, economic, and social issues influencing higher education finance; examine revenue streams and expenditure patterns; survey tuition and financial aid policies; develop the ability to examine and analyze financial information; and assess the budget as an instrument of strategic planning, resource allocation, and control. This course is grounded in literature, theories, and examples specific to higher education. The goal for this class is to provide students with the knowledge and abilities that empower them to make appropriate decisions as higher education leaders. Through assigned readings, lectures, and webcast materials, and by active course participation, including completion of assigned activities, students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their familiarity with the following topics: financing higher education; political influences; higher education revenue sources and uses; and institutional budgeting and planning.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SAA 541 Student Development Theory II

Content: This course is designed to build upon Student Development Theory I and is considered to be second in a two-part series. Coursework will enhance students’ understanding of processes of student learning, growth, and development during college. Special focus will focus on recent theories including diversity in development and the extent to which these theories are used to guide empirical research and institutional decision-making.
Prerequisites: SAA 540.
Credits: 3 semester hours.