Graduate Catalog

Teacher Leadership for Equity and Social Justice Certificate

The Teacher Leadership for Equity and Social Justice Certificate is designed to prepare teachers to be agents of change for equity and social justice, effective mentors for early career colleagues, and advocates for the educational success of all students. Students choose among five possible strands:

  • Writing
  • Reading
  • English for Speakers of Other Languages
  • Special Needs Populations
  • Instructional Leadership

The certificate aims to prepare teachers to engage effectively with others to improve instruction, promote equity, and engage as a change agent related to the social justice responsibilities of public schools. It may also be used by teachers interested in becoming mentors in their fields for early career colleagues and in other professional development contexts. In addition, it will help prepare teachers to help their schools provide equitable opportunities and outcomes for students who may have experienced barriers based on their race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexual orientation, gender identity, first language, or another element of their social identity.

The program may be taken by students enrolled in degree or endorsement programs, or it may be taken as a stand-alone program by those looking to ascertain whether school leadership is a suitable career path for them.

The program is approved by the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC).

Certificate Requirements

10-11 semester hours in one of the five following strands, distributed as follows:

Writing  (11 semester hours)

ED 592Oregon Writing Project: Workshop in Teaching Writing7
ED 594Oregon Writing Project: Practicum in Teaching Writing2
ED 596Oregon Writing Project: Advanced Institute2

Reading (10 semester hours)

READ 500Language Acquisition and Development3
READ 534Reading Comprehension: Theory and Practical Application3
EDLL 709Adult Development and Learning2
ED 542Coaching for Equity2

English for Speakers of Other Languages (10 semester hours)

ESOL 507Language Acquisition and Development3
ESOL 502Focus on Culture and Community in Teaching ESOL Students3
EDLL 709Adult Development and Learning2
ED 542Coaching for Equity2

Special Needs Populations (11 semester hours)

SPED 510Educating Students with Exceptionalities: Learning and Legal Issues2
SPED 511Behavior Change Interventions for Students with Serious Emotional and Behavioral Disorders2
SPED 514Curriculum and Instruction for Students With Exceptionalities3
EDLL 709Adult Development and Learning2
ED 542Coaching for Equity2

Instructional Leadership  (11 semester hours)

EDAD 502Instructional Leadership3
EDAD 509Using Data for School Improvement2
EDAD 508Engaging the Community for Effective Schools2
EDLL 709Adult Development and Learning2
ED 542Coaching for Equity2

Courses may also be used in support of an endorsement and/or professional licensure.

Writing Strand Courses

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ED 592 Oregon Writing Project: Workshop in Teaching Writing

Content: The four-week Invitational Summer Institute provides a supportive, dialogic environment in which to explore possibilities as writers, teachers and leaders. The theory and practice of writing are examined through individual demonstrations, reading and discussion of current research, and writing and sharing in writing response groups. Twenty-five K-12 participants develop their leadership potential for a variety of roles, including local school/district reform efforts that support the education and success of all of Oregon's diverse student population. Social justice and social action undergird the experience in an attempt to embrace democratic ideals.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Participants must submit an application and have an interview to be accepted into this program.
Credits: 7 semester hours.

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ED 594 Oregon Writing Project: Practicum in Teaching Writing

Content: After the camaraderie of the Summer Institute, too often teachers return to the isolation of their classroom. But you can reclaim your institute community in the Saturday Seminars. Whether you long for the conviviality of teachers sharing stories or you miss a community of teacher-writers who seek to increase their students' love for writing or ability to punctuate, you will fill your needs in the Saturday Seminars. Saturday Seminars are a year-long series of 3-hour workshops facilitated by the OWP director and co-directors as well as OWP teacher consultants. This class will focus on practical classroom strategies and discussions that help develop students as writers as well as teachers as writers. Topics vary from session to session, but each will include time for writing and reflection as well as a framework or lesson to take back to the classroom.
Prerequisites: ED 592/ED 692.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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ED 596 Oregon Writing Project: Advanced Institute

Content: This course is part of a series of OWP courses for teachers interested in working as writing coaches in schools and districts. Participants will examine current research from writing and coaching fields to learn effective coaching practices, develop grade-level and content-level inservice workshops, practice presentation skills. Participants will engage in an individual inquiry to apply the principles they develop through the course to support local school and district reform efforts aimed at improving writing instruction for diverse learners.
Prerequisites: ED 592/ED 692, ED 594/ED 694.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

Reading Strand Courses

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READ 500 Language Acquisition and Development

Content: Theories of how first and second languages (written and spoken) are acquired, the importance of first-language development and its relationship to the acquisition of other languages, and the relationship of language to cognitive development. Understanding of these issues is used to promote a school environment that honors diverse perspectives and maximizes language learning potential and ensures respect for communities whose languages or varieties of English differ from standard school English. Required for the Reading Interventionist and ESOL endorsements. The initial course in the Reading Interventionist endorsement sequence and recommended preparation for other language arts offerings.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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READ 534 Reading Comprehension: Theory and Practical Application

Content: In-depth exploration of current models and trends in reading comprehension and its cognitive and linguistic components. Students read widely from professional journals, explore and reflect on their personal reading processes, and do theoretical and practical projects to further their understanding. Examines factors that contribute to reading difficulty (from early childhood through adulthood), as well as important issues and questions about standardized tests, observational diagnostics, readability formulas, and the effectiveness and theoretical validity of published programs.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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EDLL 709 Adult Development and Learning

Content: Understanding how people and organizations develop and learn is centrally important for organizational leaders, whether learning is about existing or new knowledge. In this course students will explore a variety of theories related to adult learning including transformational learning, critical and feminist theories, distributed cognition, and social practice theory. Students will apply these theories to their own experiences as learners, and to learning in the organizational settings in which they work.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 542 Coaching for Equity

Content: In this course, students explore theories and tools designed to help them guide their schools and districts in identifying and addressing classroom-, organizational-, and community-level inequities. Students learn how to lead their school communities in examining and transforming policies and practices that have produced and maintained gaps in resources, opportunities, and outcomes for historically marginalized students and families. The course incorporates strategies and tools to facilitate teacher inquiry and engage in observations and mentoring for equity.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

English for Speakers of Other Languages Strand Courses

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ESOL 507 Language Acquisition and Development

Content: Theories of how first and second languages (written and spoken) are acquired, the importance of first-language development and its relationship to the acquisition of other languages, and the relationship of language to cognitive development. Understanding of these issues is used to promote a school environment that honors diverse perspectives and maximizes language learning potential and ensures respect for communities whose languages or varieties of English differ from standard school English. Required for the Reading Interventionist and ESOL endorsements. The initial course in the Reading Interventionist Endorsement sequence and recommended preparation for other language arts offerings.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ESOL 502 Focus on Culture and Community in Teaching ESOL Students

Content: Understanding the student within the context of his or her environment. The first part of the course focuses on cultural factors that influence learning and their implications for instruction. The latter part of the course examines the involvement of significant individuals in a child's academic programs and explores barriers to family involvement. Introduces cross-cultural pre-referral screening tools for gifted and special-needs English-language learners. Participants develop strategies for establishing positive school, family, and community partnerships and explore tools for combating racism and bias in schools.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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EDLL 709 Adult Development and Learning

Content: Understanding how people and organizations develop and learn is centrally important for organizational leaders, whether learning is about existing or new knowledge. In this course students will explore a variety of theories related to adult learning including transformational learning, critical and feminist theories, distributed cognition, and social practice theory. Students will apply these theories to their own experiences as learners, and to learning in the organizational settings in which they work.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 542 Coaching for Equity

Content: In this course, students explore theories and tools designed to help them guide their schools and districts in identifying and addressing classroom-, organizational-, and community-level inequities. Students learn how to lead their school communities in examining and transforming policies and practices that have produced and maintained gaps in resources, opportunities, and outcomes for historically marginalized students and families. The course incorporates strategies and tools to facilitate teacher inquiry and engage in observations and mentoring for equity.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

Special Needs Populations Strand Courses

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SPED 510 Educating Students with Exceptionalities: Learning and Legal Issues

Content: Analysis of child/adolescent development and the cognitive, linguistic, motor, behavioral, and learning characteristics of individuals with special needs. Topics include characteristics of exceptional learners, special-education history, current policies and procedures based on scientific research, incorporation of technology, and legal issues. Candidates develop or refine a research-based foundation in the education of students with special needs, including the impact of linguistic and cultural variability on special education eligibility and practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 511 Behavior Change Interventions for Students with Serious Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

Content: Study of the developmental backgrounds of students with significant emotional/behavioral problems and practices to help these students develop more productive behaviors. Emphasis on procedures for completing a functional behavior analysis (FBA) and a behavior intervention plan (BIP), research-based interventions including environmental modifications, positive behavior supports and interventions (PBIS), social-skills training, cognitive-behavioral interventions, self-monitoring, contracting, and the use of outside agencies to support the school in assisting students.
Prerequisites: SPED 510/SPED 626.
Restrictions: SPED 510/SPED 626 or consent of instructor.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 514 Curriculum and Instruction for Students With Exceptionalities

Content: Research-validated curriculum and specially designed instruction for students with disabilities. Based on Common Core State Standards, participants review and adapt general education curricula appropriate to their authorization level to create specially designed instruction that emphasizes and supports progress across academic areas, learning strategies, and appropriate accommodations. This course uses curriculum-based assessment/measurement data to craft effective, substantive, and procedurally correct individualized education plans (IEPs) and specially designed instruction aligned with the Common Core State Standards. Additionally, candidates will demonstrate all skills necessary to facilitate an IEP meeting, including group dynamics and conflict resolution strategies.
Prerequisites: SPED 513/SPED 632.
Corequisites: SPED 546/SPED 646.
Restrictions: SPED 513/SPED 632 or consent of advisor.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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EDLL 709 Adult Development and Learning

Content: Understanding how people and organizations develop and learn is centrally important for organizational leaders, whether learning is about existing or new knowledge. In this course students will explore a variety of theories related to adult learning including transformational learning, critical and feminist theories, distributed cognition, and social practice theory. Students will apply these theories to their own experiences as learners, and to learning in the organizational settings in which they work.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 542 Coaching for Equity

Content: In this course, students explore theories and tools designed to help them guide their schools and districts in identifying and addressing classroom-, organizational-, and community-level inequities. Students learn how to lead their school communities in examining and transforming policies and practices that have produced and maintained gaps in resources, opportunities, and outcomes for historically marginalized students and families. The course incorporates strategies and tools to facilitate teacher inquiry and engage in observations and mentoring for equity.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

Instructional Leadership Strand Courses

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EDAD 502 Instructional Leadership

Content: Focus on instructional leadership and how it connects to the complex relationships between teacher growth and development (supervision/evaluation), professional development, and standards-based school improvement. Draws from research on effective teaching to assist leaders in improving instructional practices. Students learn to capitalize on the diversity of the school community to improve teaching for all students.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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EDAD 509 Using Data for School Improvement

Content: Builds a common knowledge base for understanding the critical role data plays in school improvement efforts. Introduces several levels of data use and application, moving from state accountability requirements to equalizing access of high standards for all students. Participants collect, analyze, communicate, and use various forms of data in school visioning, improvement planning, and decision making.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDAD 508 Engaging the Community for Effective Schools

Content: Research shows students perform better in schools having strong community support. This course defines community engagement, identifies the critical stakeholders, and develops inclusive involvement and collaboration strategies. District demographic data, needs assessments, and socioeconomic factors are used for developing community engagement plans while taking into account categories of diversity (cultural, ethnic, racial, economic). Includes discussions of successful community engagement models.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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EDLL 709 Adult Development and Learning

Content: Understanding how people and organizations develop and learn is centrally important for organizational leaders, whether learning is about existing or new knowledge. In this course students will explore a variety of theories related to adult learning including transformational learning, critical and feminist theories, distributed cognition, and social practice theory. Students will apply these theories to their own experiences as learners, and to learning in the organizational settings in which they work.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Ed.D. program or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

Print This Course

ED 542 Coaching for Equity

Content: In this course, students explore theories and tools designed to help them guide their schools and districts in identifying and addressing classroom-, organizational-, and community-level inequities. Students learn how to lead their school communities in examining and transforming policies and practices that have produced and maintained gaps in resources, opportunities, and outcomes for historically marginalized students and families. The course incorporates strategies and tools to facilitate teacher inquiry and engage in observations and mentoring for equity.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.