Graduate Catalog

Teacher Education Courses

Note: Some of the courses listed below may not be offered during the current academic year. Current course offerings are listed in the WebAdvisor course schedule, available online

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ED 500 Educational Research

Content: This course examines how professional educators can gather and interpret the information they need for effective decision making. Topics include the major uses and components of classroom or school-based research processes, quantitative and qualitative methods, the scholarly critique of research studies, and what it means to be a reflective teacher-researcher.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2-3 semester hours.

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ED 509 Master's Project Seminar

Content: Culmination of the master's inservice program. Students have the opportunity to integrate what they have learned. In consultation with the instructor, students design a project that defines and answers a question about creating engaging, responsive, democratic learning communities for diverse learners related to their teaching or intellectual and professional development. Class time is reduced to accommodate individual conferences with the instructor and students' research time. The class meets as a group to support students' synthesis of each other's work and for problem-solving as research and writing proceed.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: To be taken at end of master's program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 511 Field Observation and the Cycle of Effective Teaching

Content: This course provides candidates in the Elementary—Multiple Subjects Preservice Program opportunities to observe teaching and learning in a variety of school contexts and closely examine the planning, instruction, and assessment cycle. Students will attend guided visits to schools and examine video recordings representing instruction in diverse demographic contexts and using varied instructional models and engage in the planning, instruction, assessment cycle.
Prerequisites: None.
Corequisites: ED 514.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary—Multiple Subjects Program.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ED 514 Elementary - Multiple Subjects Field Experience I

Content: Part-time student teaching experience in an elementary classroom. In addition to observing classroom instruction, the student teacher-intern serves as apprentice to the mentor teacher by providing assistance at the teacher's direction and working with individuals and small groups of students. Student teacher-interns also observe and work with small groups at their second authorization level according to the guidelines in the Elementary - Multiple Subjects program handbook.
Prerequisites: None.
Corequisites: ED 517.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary - Multiple Subjects Program.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ED 515 Elementary - Multiple Subjects Field Experience II

Content: Intensive student teaching experience. Each student teacher-intern assumes full-time teaching responsibility under the supervision of a mentor teacher and a Lewis Clark faculty supervisor. This experience builds on the student teaching begun during the previous semester. Student teacher-interns also complete observations at their second authorization level according to the guidelines in the program handbook.
Prerequisites: ED 514.
Corequisites: ED 518.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary - Multiple Subjects Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 516 Elementary - Multiple Subjects Field Experience III

Content: Conclusion of intensive student teaching experience, building on and concluding the teaching begun during previous semesters. Each student teacher-intern completes required full-time teaching responsibility under the supervision of a mentor teacher and a Lewis Clark faculty supervisor. Student teacher-interns also complete observation and teaching at their second authorization level.
Prerequisites: ED 514, ED 515.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary - Multiple Subjects Program.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ED 517 Elementary - Multiple Subjects Field Experience Seminar I

Content: Reflective discussions of teaching, learning, and assessment practices in diverse contexts.
Prerequisites: None.
Corequisites: ED 514.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary - Multiple Subjects Program.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ED 518 Field Experience Seminar II (Elementary - Multiple Subjects)

Content: Reflective discussion of teaching, learning, and assessment practices in diverse contexts as well as school law, child abuse, and discrimination.
Prerequisites: None.
Corequisites: ED 515.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary - Multiple Subjects Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 523 Planning, Differentiation, and Assessment

Content: In-depth examination of the relationships between planning, differentiation, and assessment. Focus on individually and culturally responsive approaches to teaching and learning. Topics include implementing backward design, utilizing a variety of instructional strategies, and using differentiated kinds of formative/summative assessment.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary—Multiple Subjects Program.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ED 533 Legal Issues in Education

Content: Students examine legal issues related to the teaching profession so that secondary teachers are literate about how the law affects them and their students, including students with exceptionalities. Utilizing a case-study approach, participants explore topics including responsibilities and liabilities; teachers’ and students’ rights; the scope and limits of personal freedom of expression, religion, and association as well as personal appearance and privacy; due process rights; discrimination and equal protection; teacher contracts, evaluation, and collective bargaining; and the general education teacher’s roles and responsibilities in special education processes, with the goal of providing all students with a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment (LRE) as required by law.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Preservice Program.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ED 539 Oregon Writing Project: Special Studies

Content: Oregon Writing Project courses focus on the teaching of writing. Writing is essential to success--in school and the workplace. Yet writing is a skill that cannot be learned on the spot; it is complex and challenging. Our courses are taught with varying emphases based on grade level, content area, or specific genres. All of our courses help teach students to write in all subjects with clarity and style, seek deeper and more critical understanding of writing and the world, wake up their own voice and authority, take command of their own learning, and manage portfolios and other exhibition forms.
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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ED 540 Secondary Field Experience I

Content: Part-time student teaching experience in a middle-school or high-school classroom under the supervision of a mentor holding the same content area endorsement as the teacher candidate. Candidates teach their first work sample in this classroom. In addition, they spend a series of full-time days in the classroom of a teacher in another building at their second level of authorization.
Prerequisites: None.
Corequisites: ED 553.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Preservice Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 541 Secondary Field Experience II

Content: Intensive student teaching experience in a middle school or high school classroom under the supervision of a mentor holding the same content area endorsement as the teacher candidate. Teacher candidates teach one class on a daily basis, with the support of their mentor and will teach a second work sample in this class. Candidates will also serve as the daily teacher for this single course until the end of the school year. In addition, teacher candidates will spend an increasing amount of time in the classes they will take on after spring break (these might be courses that their mentor teaches or they could be classes taught by another teacher in the same department). The goal is to have all teacher candidates at their site full-time with a 3/4 teaching load during the month of April and beyond.
Prerequisites: ED 540.
Corequisites: ED 554.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Preservice Program.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ED 542 Coaching for Equity

Content: In this course, students explore theories and tools designed to help them guide their schools and districts in identifying and addressing classroom-, organizational-, and community-level inequities. Students learn how to lead their school communities in examining and transforming policies and practices that have produced and maintained gaps in resources, opportunities, and outcomes for historically marginalized students and families. The course incorporates strategies and tools to facilitate teacher inquiry and engage in observations and mentoring for equity.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 543 Secondary Field Experience III

Content: Teacher candidates continue their intensive student teaching internship in a middle school or high school classroom under the supervision of a mentor holding the same content area endorsement as the teacher candidate. Interns are at their placement sites full-time contract hours, responsible for a 3/4 teaching load through the end of the K-12 academic year, completing and/or assisting their mentor will all “end-of-school” tasks and activities.
Prerequisites: ED 541.
Corequisites: ED 573.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Preservice Program.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ED 544 Practicum

Content: Supervised, on-site, pre-designed professional experience along with campus seminars involving discussions and presentations. Students explore the essential content knowledge, leadership, collaboration, and research skills of successful educators under the supervision of experienced field and campus supervisors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Practicum to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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ED 550 Social, Historical, and Ethical Perspectives on Education

Content: Critical and comprehensive review of education and schooling in American society. Considers education in its larger socioeconomic, political, ideological, and cultural contexts and examines race, class, gender, and culture in the formal educational system. Analyzes issues of goals, funding, governance, curricula, policy, staffing, and reforms both in historical and contemporary forms. Participants study education both as a microcosm of society, reflecting the larger struggles in the country, and as a quasi-autonomous entity.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to a preservice teacher education program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 551 Literacy and Teacher Research

Content: Understanding the central importance of language and the social construction of knowledge guides the work of this course. Teacher candidates examine issues of diverse perspectives as well as an integrated, process-oriented approach to reading and writing in the subject field. The teacher research component stresses qualitative methods for understanding the learning environment and the meaning-making systems of students. At their field experience sites, preservice teachers conduct interviews and apply ethnographic methods as well as observation systems to diagnose the meaning-making strategies of a selected middle or high school student. They use this experience to identify resources and practices for supporting all students in improved literacy learning.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Preservice Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 552 Adolescent Development: Understanding Your Learners

Content: Discussion, critique, and application of current research on adolescent development, understood from psychosocial, culturally responsive, and justice-oriented perspectives. Explores theories of cognitive, relational, sexual, moral, and spiritual development with an emphasis on the middle- and high-school student’s construction of identity as it is shaped by culture, ethnicity, gender, linguistic heritage, race, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status. Examines strategies for promoting resilience and engaging students in learning experiences that are responsive to development levels and cultural contexts. Also investigates insights from neuropsychology and the impact on adolescent well-being as a result of risk-taking behaviors, societal (mis)interpretations of youth, and the ubiquity of digital media.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Preservice Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 553 Teaching for Social Justice: Secondary Field Experience Seminar I

Content: Teacher candidates take part in a professional seminar that supports their fall student teaching as well as the observation experience and portfolio at their “other level” placement site. Topics include teacher identity, professionalism, reflective practice, renewal of and support for teachers, observation protocols, and the creation of democratic learning communities. Teacher candidates gain practice in teaching through a concurrent internship placement in a middle school or high school and a practicum at the “other level.”
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Preservice Program.
Credits: 1.5 semester hours.

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ED 554 Teaching for Social Justice: Secondary Field Experience Seminar II

Content: Students take part in a professional seminar supporting their spring student teaching internship. Topics include renewal of and support for teachers, teacher identity, supervision, and reflection on and self-evaluation of teaching practice. Examination of a professional identity continues, including job search strategies and support. Participants gain practice in teaching through a concurrent internship placement in a middle school or high school.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Current enrollment in Secondary Preservice Program internship.
Credits: 1.5 semester hours.

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ED 560 Classroom Management: Co-Building a Learning Community

Content: Places classroom management in a socio-political and justice-oriented context by focusing on understanding students' personal, social, and academic needs, creating optimal teacher-student and peer relationships, and co-creating norms and procedures that support democratic learning communities. Critiques coercive methods aimed at achieving obedience and explores schoolwide and classroom-specific practices that draw on student diversity as a resource rather than impediment. Examines culturally responsive and inclusive teaching methods that prevent discipline problems, promote flow, sustain collaborations with parents and other educators, and enhance agency and transparency while maintaining accountability.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Preservice Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 561 Child Development and Learning

Content: Discussion, critique, and application of theories of child development and learning. Through case studies, cultural narratives, theoretical constructs, and research, participants explore children's development within diverse cultural and family systems, including the cognitive, affective, psychological, social, moral, identity, and physiological domains. Topics include multiple intelligences and ways of knowing, creativity, and motivation, as well as the influences of social, cultural, linguistic, familial, and institutional factors on children's development and learning.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary—Multiple Subjects Program or consent of instructor.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 563 Classroom Management 1: Elementary - Multiple Subjects

Content: Creating a community of support in the classroom. Emphasizes understanding students' personal needs, creating positive teacher-student and peer relationships, creating classroom rules and procedures within a democratic learning community, and responding to minor behavior problems.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to the Elementary - Multiple Subjects preservice Program.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ED 564 Classroom Management 2: Elementary - Multiple Subjects

Content: Major emphasis on resolving behavior problems that occur in the classroom, working with students' families, and developing individual behavior plans for students who demonstrate serious and ongoing behavior problems. Includes a focus on culturally sensitive classroom management.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to the Elementary - Multiple Subjects preservice program.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ED 568 The Arts, Culture, and Creativity

Content: Participants explore how students and educators think about and engage in the arts in connection with other areas of learning and development. Through creative, constructivist experiences, participants explore concepts such as patterns, pitch, texture, line, narration, and color within the fields of music, visual arts, storytelling, and movement, enacted within different cultural perspectives. Emphasis on creativity, process, and understanding the nature and value of the arts in human lives and cultures.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary - Multiple Subjects Program.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ED 569 Health and Physical Education

Content: Age-appropriate skill and fitness development, practical use of the gym and equipment, personal safety, wellness, and nutrition. Topics include methods of assessing physical education skills and integrating physical education and health into the math and language arts curriculum.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary—Multiple Subjects Program.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ED 573 Teaching for Social Justice: Classroom Management Workshop

Content: Provides ongoing support for interns during their spring student teaching practica. Workshop format encourages the collaborative analyses of classroom management challenges that are typically encountered during this phase of the teacher development process. Specific research-based classroom strategies are modeled, critiqued, and applied while modes of critical inquiry introduced in ED 560 are reinforced. Approximately one-third of each session will be dedicated to soliciting, discussing, and troubleshooting interns’ self-identified “issues from the field.”
Prerequisites: ED 560.
Corequisites: ED 543.
Restrictions: Students must have successfully transitioned into their full "takeover" student teaching in the spring and admission to the Secondary Preservice Program.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ED 574 Personal Voice in Professional Writing

Content: A workshop to explore the power of writing to engage diverse perspectives, ideas, and cultures at the restless boundary between personal insight and professional practice. In our search for equity, social justice, and inclusion, collaborative writing in professional life may be the most important writing we do. As educators our own writing is our best teacher, as counselors our written reflections will give us our best advice, and as leaders our work will be improved by writing about the challenges we face. To foster expressive clarity, the class as a writing community examines reading, collaboration, personal voice, critical thinking, and audience.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ED 576 Special Studies: Northwest Writing Institute

Content: This course uses writing as a tool for inquiry and creative expression. Taught with varying emphases based on the cultural moment, the course offers Graduate Students and community members practice with writing, and reflection on the chapters in a life, and investigates how the practice of writing can deepen vocation. Students write in a learning community, and share works in progress. Offered in varied formats-meeting weekends, monthly over two terms, or in a traditional structure-to meet the needs of adult learners.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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ED 580 Teaching Life Through Art: The Creative Process

Content: Exploration of the creative process incorporating studio work, readings, and discussions. Through the language of visual art, students explore ideas about being creative and learn how to integrate the discipline and practice of art in ways that extend their understanding and enhance their capacity to solve problems. Participants employ a variety of techniques, mediums, technologies, and artistic forms—drawing, painting, sculpture, and writing—to exercise their creative self and find their voice. Students are encouraged to reflect on insights from art history, aesthetics, and criticism to critically evaluate their art experience. Incorporates diverse teaching approaches including studio work and lectures.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Visual art background required.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 589 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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ED 590 Oregon Writing Project: Teaching the Emergent K-2 Writer

Content: This practical, hands-on class is designed specifically for K-2 teachers. A key assumption of this course is that the best way to learn about writing is to write in a variety of modes and for a variety of purposes, and to reflect on the complex processes involved in that act. Participants can expect to write regularly. Low-stakes experiments in different genres, informal reading responses, and portfolio reflections will be part of the mix. Class members will learn how to find a rich variety of texts that provide their students with a clear vision of writing, they will discover how to strategically select texts to support whole-class learning as well as individual choice, and they will learn how to embed writing into their year-long curriculum. Participants will share ideas and draw on the experiences of their colleagues while taking away lessons and strategies directly applicable to the K-2 classroom.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Current employment, or on temporary leave, as a public or private school K-2 teacher.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 592 Oregon Writing Project: Workshop in Teaching Writing

Content: The four-week Invitational Summer Institute provides a supportive, dialogic environment in which to explore possibilities as writers, teachers and leaders. The theory and practice of writing are examined through individual demonstrations, reading and discussion of current research, and writing and sharing in writing response groups. Twenty-five K-12 participants develop their leadership potential for a variety of roles, including local school/district reform efforts that support the education and success of all of Oregon's diverse student population. Social justice and social action undergird the experience in an attempt to embrace democratic ideals.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Participants must submit an application and have an interview to be accepted into this program.
Credits: 7 semester hours.

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ED 594 Oregon Writing Project: Practicum in Teaching Writing

Content: After the camaraderie of the Summer Institute, too often teachers return to the isolation of their classroom. But you can reclaim your institute community in the Saturday Seminars. Whether you long for the conviviality of teachers sharing stories or you miss a community of teacher-writers who seek to increase their students' love for writing or ability to punctuate, you will fill your needs in the Saturday Seminars. Saturday Seminars are a year-long series of 3-hour workshops facilitated by the OWP director and co-directors as well as OWP teacher consultants. This class will focus on practical classroom strategies and discussions that help develop students as writers as well as teachers as writers. Topics vary from session to session, but each will include time for writing and reflection as well as a framework or lesson to take back to the classroom.
Prerequisites: ED 592/ED 692.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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ED 596 Oregon Writing Project: Advanced Institute

Content: This course is part of a series of OWP courses for teachers interested in working as writing coaches in schools and districts. Participants will examine current research from writing and coaching fields to learn effective coaching practices, develop grade-level and content-level inservice workshops, practice presentation skills. Participants will engage in an individual inquiry to apply the principles they develop through the course to support local school and district reform efforts aimed at improving writing instruction for diverse learners.
Prerequisites: ED 592/ED 692, ED 594/ED 694.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 597 Oregon Writing Project: Writing for Publication

Content: This course is part of a series for OWP graduates interested in becoming writing coaches in schools/districts. Teachers will write narratives of school/teaching life, articles about theory and practice grounded in classroom lessons, opinion pieces about issues in the teaching of writing for publications. First class is a three-day writing retreat.
Prerequisites: ED 592/ED 692, ED 594/ED 694.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ED 598 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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ED 599 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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ED 601 Reflective Teacher

Content: Exploration of the "heart of the teacher" through personal stories; reflections on classroom practice; and insights from poets, storytellers, and diverse cultural traditions. Based on an 18-month calendar with five retreats organized around the themes of agriculture and the seasons. This course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Admission to Courage to Teach Program.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Courage to Teach Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 602 Reflective Teacher

Content: Exploration of the "heart of the teacher" through personal stories; reflections on classroom practice; and insights from poets, storytellers, and diverse cultural traditions. Based on an 18-month calendar with five retreats organized around the themes of agriculture and the seasons. This course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Admission to Courage to Teach Program.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Courage to Teach Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 615 Educational Research

Content: This course examines how professional educators can gather and interpret the information they need for effective decision making. Topics include the major uses and components of classroom or school-based research processes, quantitative and qualitative methods, the scholarly critique of research studies, and what it means to be a reflective teacher-researcher.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2-3 semester hours.

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ED 624 Master's Project Seminar

Content: Culmination of the master's inservice program. Students have the opportunity to integrate what they have learned. In consultation with the instructor, students design a project that defines and answers a question about creating engaging, responsive, democratic learning communities for diverse learners related to their teaching or intellectual and professional development. Class time is reduced to accommodate individual conferences with the instructor and students' research time. The class meets as a group to support students' synthesis of each other's work and for problem-solving as research and writing proceed.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: To be taken at end of master's program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 633 Revisiting the Teacher's Heart: A Retreat for Educators With One to Five Years of Experience

Content: This two-and-a-half day retreat will engage participants in conversations that touch on the ideals and commitments that originally drew them to become professional educators and create a space in which people can explore the delights and frustrations they have encountered as beginning teachers. Through the incorporation of silence, reflection, and creative expression, the rereat will provide an opportunity for personal and professional renewal.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Participants must have taught at least one and no more than five years in public schools.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ED 637 New Teacher Seminar

Content: The New Teacher Seminar provides an opportunity for new teachers to join together in conversations around issues relevant to new teachers' experiences and needs. The group, led by a mentor teacher, meets during the school year to offer support and resources to one another.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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ED 639 Oregon Writing Project: Special Studies

Content: Oregon Writing Project courses focus on the teaching of writing. Writing is essential to success--in school and the workplace. Yet writing is a skill that cannot be learned on the spot; it is complex and challenging. Our courses are taught with varying emphases based on grade level, content area, or specific genres. All of our courses help teach students to write in all subjects with clarity and style, seek deeper and more critical understanding of writing and the world, wake up their own voice and authority, take command of their own learning, manage portfolios and other exhibition forms.
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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ED 640 Critical Friends Group Coaches Training

Content: A Critical Friends Group (CFG) is a professional-learning community of teachers, school leaders, counselors, school psychologists, and classified staff that commits to collaborating on a long-term basis with the goal of increasing student achievement. CFGs provide a forum for professional development that focuses on developing collegial relationships and encouraging reflective practice. Participation in CFGs build facilitative leadership skills, engages school communities in work worth doing, fosters a focused school community, and builds a collaborative and reflective culture in schools. Through consistent meetings, CFG participants work together to improve practice, to examine curriculum and student work, to identify school culture that affect student achievement, and to observe each other at work. By examining student and adult work through collaborative reflection, educators hold themselves accountable for continuous improvement in teaching.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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ED 642 Coaching for Equity

Content: In this course, students explore theories and tools designed to help them guide their schools and districts in identifying and addressing classroom-, organizational-, and community-level inequities. Students learn how to lead their school communities in examining and transforming policies and practices that have produced and maintained gaps in resources, opportunities, and outcomes for historically marginalized students and families. The course incorporates strategies and tools to facilitate teacher inquiry and engage in observations and mentoring for equity.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 644 Practicum

Content: Supervised, on-site, pre-designed professional experience along with campus seminars involving discussions and presentations. Students explore the essential content knowledge, leadership, collaboration, and research skills of successful educators under the supervision of experienced field and campus supervisors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Practicum to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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ED 645 Interview/Life Stories

Content: Writers, oral historians, ethnographers, teachers, counselors, families recording their stories all rely on interviews. In this workshop, we'll learn the interviewer's skills: how to listen and observe, frame questions, index and transcribe. We'll write together to bring the interviews to life on the page. We'll examine individual and social memory as well as ethical and political issues. We'll also explore the use of interviews in community projects and as the foundation of documentary studies.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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ED 676 Special Studies: Northwest Writing Institute

Content: This course uses writing as a tool for inquiry and creative expression. Taught with varying emphases based on the cultural moment, the course offers Graduate Students and community members practice with writing, and reflection on the chapters in a life, and investigates how the practice of writing can deepen vocation. Students write in a learning community, and share works in progress. Offered in varied formats-meeting weekends, monthly over two terms, or in a traditional structure-to meet the needs of adult learners.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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ED 689 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

Print This Course

ED 690 Oregon Writing Project: Teaching the Emergent K-2 Writer

Content: This practical, hands-on class is designed specifically for K-2 teachers. A key assumption of this course is that the best way to learn about writing is to write in a variety of modes and for a variety of purposes, and to reflect on the complex processes involved in that act. Participants can expect to write regularly. Low-stakes experiments in different genres, informal reading responses, and portfolio reflections will be part of the mix. Class members will learn how to find a rich variety of texts that provide their students with a clear vision of writing, they will discover how to strategically select texts to support whole-class learning as well as individual choice, and they will learn how to embed writing into their year-long curriculum. Participants will share ideas and draw on the experiences of their colleagues while taking away lessons and strategies directly applicable to the K-2 classroom.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of Oregon Writing Project program coordinator.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 692 Oregon Writing Project: Workshop in Teaching Writing

Content: The four-week Invitational Summer Institute provides a supportive, dialogic environment in which to explore possibilities as writers, teachers and leaders. The theory and practice of writing are examined through individual demonstrations, reading and discussion of current research, and writing and sharing in writing response groups. Twenty-five K-12 participants develop their leadership potential for a variety of roles, including local school/district reform efforts that support the education and success of all of Oregon's diverse student population. Social justice and social action undergird the experience in an attempt to embrace democratic ideals.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Participants must submit an application and have an interview to be accepted into this program.
Credits: 7 semester hours.

Print This Course

ED 694 Oregon Writing Project: Practicum in Teaching Writing

Content: After the camaraderie of the Summer Institute, too often teachers return to the isolation of their classroom. But you can reclaim your institute community in the Saturday Seminars. Whether you long for the conviviality of teachers sharing stories or you miss a community of teacher-writers who seek to increase their students' love for writing or ability to punctuate, you will fill your needs in the Saturday Seminars. Saturday Seminars are a year-long series of 3-hour workshops facilitated by the OWP director and co-directors as well as OWP teacher consultants. This class will focus on practical classroom strategies and discussions that help develop students as writers as well as teachers as writers. Topics vary from session to session, but each will include time for writing and reflection as well as a framework or lesson to take back to the classroom.
Prerequisites: ED 592/ED 692.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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ED 695 Oregon Writing Project: Writing in Schools: (Topic)

Content: Inquiry course designed to improve the teaching of writing. Participants examine and evaluate current research on writing instruction; they investigate writings from generation to revision and editing by participating in writing workshops themselves. Teachers also design a writing curriculum to take back to their classrooms. They keep reflective journals analyzing their students' writing processes and products. Teachers deepen their understanding of the complexities of teaching, learning, and writing.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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ED 696 Oregon Writing Project: Advanced Institute

Content: This course is part of a series of OWP courses for teachers interested in working as writing coaches in schools and districts. Participants will examine current research from writing and coaching fields to learn effective coaching practices, develop grade-level and content-level inservice workshops, practice presentation skills. Participants will engage in an individual inquiry to apply the principles they develop through the course to support local school and district reform efforts aimed at improving writing instruction for diverse learners.
Prerequisites: ED 592/ED 692, ED 594/ED 694.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ED 697 Oregon Writing Project: Writing for Publication

Content: This course is part of a series for OWP graduates interested in becoming writing coaches in schools/districts. Teachers will write narratives of school/teaching life, articles about theory and practice grounded in classroom lessons, opinion pieces about issues in the teaching of writing for publications. First class is a three-day writing retreat.
Prerequisites: ED 592/ED 692, ED 594/ED 694.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ED 698 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 0.5-4 semester hours.

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ED 699 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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ED 989 Professional Studies: International Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

Subject-Area Courses

Art

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ART 510 Teaching Life Through Art: The Creative Process

Content: Exploration of the creative process incorporating studio work, readings, and discussions. Through the language of visual art, students explore ideas about being creative and learn how to integrate the discipline and practice of art in ways that extend their understanding and enhance their capacity to solve problems. Participants employ a variety of techniques, mediums, technologies, and artistic forms—drawing, painting, sculpture, and writing—to exercise their creative self and find their voice. Students are encouraged to reflect on insights from art history, aesthetics, and criticism to critically evaluate their art experience. Incorporates diverse teaching approaches including studio work and lectures.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Visual art background required.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ART 513 Digital Technology in Visual Arts

Content: Overview of computer graphics for teachers of art. The course introduces skills for using computer graphics applications and computer hardware (scanners, cameras, and printers). Integration of traditional visual arts philosophy with digital technology in the teaching of basic design as well as historical/aesthetic concepts. Students will use digital tools to create concepts for original works of art in digital and traditional forms, and will develop both print and digital curricula and projects.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Strong graphic design background required.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ART 516 Ceramics/Sculpture in Visual Art

Content: Overview of sculpture and ceramics techniques for teachers of art. Covers an introduction to basic two-dimensional forming methods through the design and execution of various functional and sculptural projects. Introduction of glazing and kiln-firing techniques used by secondary art teachers. Exploration of historical and contemporary trends, with an emphasis on diversity in today's secondary art classroom.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Background in art or art education or consent of instructor.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ART 534 Printmaking: Silk Screen

Content: Crayon-tusche and glue, paper, photo stencils, and other techniques. Emphasis on multicolor and larger-scale prints.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ART 544 Practicum

Content: Supervised, on-site, pre-designed professional experience along with campus seminars involving discussions and presentations. Students explore the essential content knowledge, leadership, collaboration, and research skills of successful educators under the supervision of experienced field and campus supervisors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Practicum Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ART 564 Curriculum and Inquiry: Art

Content: Further organizing and applying of appropriate curriculum and teaching approaches to engage mid-level and high school students in meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental readiness, and cultural contexts. Attention to research and theory in art curriculum and pedagogy. Candidates continue to develop as teacher researchers by refining habits of personal and scholarly reflection that examine their professional practice. Topics include backward design in support of planning and assessment; review and application of curriculum materials; social and political contexts that impact curriculum; exploration of the role of inquiry in art. Continued analysis of best practice methodology. Candidates complete the edTPA portfolio.
Prerequisites: ART 579.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Program.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ART 579 Teaching Art to Adolescents

Content: Teaching and learning art in middle-level and high school classrooms. Emphasizes the wide range of instructional issues and concerns encountered in the art classroom. Links disciplinary knowledge related to state standards on creating, presenting, responding and connecting to the production of a variety of media. Includes planning, organization, and assessment practices using the tenets of backward design, aimed at supporting the successful learning of all students. Emphasizes differentiated instruction to enhance meaningful experience of students with varied interests, developmental levels, and cultural backgrounds. Materials draw upon research from the history and philosophy of the visual arts, with attention to "human constructivist" views and adolescent development. Candidates write the teaching plan for their December teaching.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Preservice Program or consent of instructor.
Credits: 4 semester hours.

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ART 589 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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ART 598 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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ART 599 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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ART 644 Practicum

Content: Supervised, on-site, pre-designed professional experience along with campus seminars involving discussions and presentations. Students explore the essential content knowledge, leadership, collaboration, and research skills of successful educators under the supervision of experienced field and campus supervisors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission od application for Practicum Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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ART 689 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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ART 698 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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ART 699 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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ART 989 Professional Studies: International Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

ESOL

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ESOL 500 Historical and Legal Foundations of Educating ESOL Students

Content: Examination of the history of trends and attitudes toward immigrants and learners of English as a second language. Topics include the psychological, social, and political characteristics of bilingualism and biculturalism in the United States and abroad. ESOL teaching is considered in light of laws, research findings, and second-language acquisition theory. Explores the distinction between language difference and disabilities and provides an overview of legal issues pertaining to second-language learners and special and gifted education students. Also provides critical reading of research-based programs, English-language proficiency standards, and standardized test measures. Ensures that educators are not only able to plan and implement programs designed for the optimal learning of all students, but also gives educators the tools to advocate for equity in their schools and school communities.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ESOL 501 Strategies and Materials for Teaching Content and English Language Development to ESOL Students

Content: How and whys of content-learning approaches such as sheltered English, integrated language teaching, applications of language experience, whole language, and cooperative learning for second-language learners. Provides grounding in the relationship between first- and second-language literacy, oral language proficiency, and culturally responsive reading comprehension. Explores materials, literacy teaching approaches, classroom organization, formal and alternative assessment measures, technology integration, and the alignment of curriculum models with English-language proficiency levels. Participants critically examine curriculum models, community resources, and content in relation to student experience.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ESOL 502 Focus on Culture and Community in Teaching ESOL Students

Content: Understanding the student within the context of his or her environment. The first part of the course focuses on cultural factors that influence learning and their implications for instruction. The latter part of the course examines the involvement of significant individuals in a child's academic programs and explores barriers to family involvement. Introduces cross-cultural pre-referral screening tools for gifted and special-needs English-language learners. Participants develop strategies for establishing positive school, family, and community partnerships and explore tools for combating racism and bias in schools.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ESOL 505 ESOL Practicum (Elementary - Multiple Subjects)

Content: Apprenticeship to a mentor who works in a classroom that requires the ESOL endorsement. Practicum may be conducted in a variety of classrooms, such as English as a Second Language (ESL), bilingual, or English Language Development (ELD). Practicum interns work with individuals as well as small and large groups to practice teaching students who are acquiring English as a second language. As part of the practicum, candidates are assigned an on-site mentor and a university supervisor. Candidates are observed teaching two ELD/ESL lessons and two sheltered content lessons.
Prerequisites: ESOL 535A and ESOL 535B, or ESOL 501/601.
Credits: 0.5-2 semester hours.

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ESOL 506 ESOL Practicum (Secondary)

Content: Apprenticeship to a mentor who works in a classroom that requires the ESOL endorsement. Practicum may be conducted in a variety of classrooms, such as English as a Second Language (ESL), bilingual, or English Language Development (ELD). Practicum interns work with individuals as well as small and large groups to practice teaching students who are acquiring English as a second language. As part of the practicum, candidates are assigned an on-site mentor and a university supervisor. Candidates are observed teaching two ELD/ESL lessons and two sheltered content lessons.
Prerequisites: ESOL 501/ESOL 601, ESOL 535A and ESOL 535B.
Credits: 0.5-2 semester hours.

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ESOL 507 Language Acquisition and Development

Content: Theories of how first and second languages (written and spoken) are acquired, the importance of first-language development and its relationship to the acquisition of other languages, and the relationship of language to cognitive development. Understanding of these issues is used to promote a school environment that honors diverse perspectives and maximizes language learning potential and ensures respect for communities whose languages or varieties of English differ from standard school English. Required for the Reading Interventionist and ESOL endorsements. The initial course in the Reading Interventionist Endorsement sequence and recommended preparation for other language arts offerings.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ESOL 535 English Language Learners: Theory and Practice

Content: This course is designed to prepare secondary preservice teachers for meeting the linguistic and academic needs of English Language Learners, by providing an overview of language acquisition theory and program components. Students will learn how to identify and use appropriate second language assessment tools, create language and content objectives, and design lessons that target various levels of language proficiency. Teachers will also identify resources (personnel and materials) to effectively serve linguistically diverse populations.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Enrollment in the final term of a preservice teacher education program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ESOL 535A Strategies and Materials for Teaching English Language Learners Part I

Content: This course is designed to prepare pre-K-12 preservice teachers for meeting the linguistic and academic needs of English Language Learners by providing an overview of language acquisitions theory and program components. Teachers will also identify resources (personnel and materials) to effectively serve linguistically diverse populations.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Enrollment in a preservice teacher education program.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ESOL 535B Strategies and Materials for Teaching English Language Learners Part II

Content: This course is designed to prepare p-K-12 preservice teachers for meeting the linguistic and academic needs of English Language Learners by providing an overview of language acquisitions theory and program components. Teachers will also identify resources (personnel and materials) to effectively serve linguistically diverse populations.
Prerequisites: ESOL 535A.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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ESOL 540 Culturally Responsive Teaching in Linguistically Diverse Classrooms

Content: This course focuses on using culturally responsive classroom practices to engage learners whose first and/or home language is not English. We will explore how the candidate’s culture and race intersect with learning and teaching. Course content centers on key elements impacting teaching and learning, including race, culture, and language, which will be examined through the lens of classroom practice, school engagement, and community resources that support and build upon student and family assets. Candidates develop strategies to work with significant people in the child's environment in order to support and encourage success in schools. Candidates examine barriers to family involvement and learn strategies to encourage the development of positive working relationships between home and school. Topics for readings and discussion include, race, socio-economics, language, social and cultural capital, language, and immigration.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to a preservice teacher education program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ESOL 544 Practicum

Content: Supervised, on-site, pre-designed professional experience along with campus seminars involving discussions and presentations. Students explore the essential content knowledge, leadership, collaboration, and research skills of successful educators under the supervision of experienced field and campus supervisors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Practicum to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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ESOL 589 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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ESOL 598 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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ESOL 599 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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ESOL 600 Historical and Legal Foundations of Educating ESOL Students

Content: Examination of the history of trends and attitudes toward immigrants and learners of English as a second language. Topics include the psychological, social, and political characteristics of bilingualism and biculturalism in the United States and abroad. ESOL teaching is considered in light of laws, research findings, and second-language acquisition theory. Explores the distinction between language difference and disabilities and provides an overview of legal issues pertaining to second-language learners and special and gifted education students. Also provides critical reading of research-based programs, English-language proficiency standards, and standardized test measures. Ensures that educators are not only able to plan and implement programs designed for the optimal learning of all students, but also gives educators the tools to advocate for equity in their schools and school communities.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ESOL 601 Strategies and Materials for Teaching Content and English Language Development to ESOL Students

Content: How and whys of content-learning approaches such as sheltered English, integrated language teaching, applications of language experience, whole language, and cooperative learning for second-language learners. Provides grounding in the relationship between first- and second-language literacy, oral language proficiency, and culturally responsive reading comprehension. Explores materials, literacy teaching approaches, classroom organization, formal and alternative assessment measures, technology integration, and the alignment of curriculum models with English-language proficiency levels. Participants critically examine curriculum models, community resources, and content in relation to student experience.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ESOL 602 Focus on Culture and Community in Teaching ESOL Students

Content: Understanding the student within the context of his or her environment. The first part of the course focuses on cultural factors that influence learning and their implications for instruction. The latter part of the course examines the involvement of significant individuals in a child's academic programs and explores barriers to family involvement. Introduces cross-cultural pre-referral screening tools for gifted and special-needs English-language learners. Participants develop strategies for establishing positive school, family, and community partnerships and explore tools for combating racism and bias in schools.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ESOL 605 ESOL Practicum (Elementary - Multiple Subjects)

Content: Apprenticeship to a mentor who works in a classroom that requires the ESOL endorsement. Practicum may be conducted in a variety of classrooms, such as English as a Second Language (ESL), bilingual, or English Language Development (ELD). Practicum interns work with individuals as well as small and large groups to practice teaching students who are acquiring English as a second language. As part of the practicum, candidates are assigned an on- site mentor and a university supervisor. Candidates are observed teaching two ELD/ESL lessons and two sheltered content lessons.
Prerequisites: ESOL 535A and ESOL 535B, or ESOL 501/601.
Credits: 0.5-2 semester hours.

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ESOL 606 ESOL Practicum (Secondary)

Content: Apprenticeship to a mentor who works in a classroom that requires the ESOL endorsement. Practicum may be conducted in a variety of classrooms, such as English as a Second Language (ESL), bilingual, or English Language Development (ELD). Practicum interns work with individuals as well as small and large groups to practice teaching students who are acquiring English as a second language. As part of the practicum, candidates are assigned an on-site mentor and a university supervisor. Candidates are observed teaching two ELD/ESL lessons and two sheltered content lessons.
Prerequisites: ESOL 501/ESOL 601, or ESOL 535A and ESOL 535B.
Credits: 0.5-2 semester hours.

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ESOL 607 Language Acquisition and Development

Content: Theories of how first and second languages (written and spoken) are acquired, the importance of first-language development and its relationship to the acquisition of other languages, and the relationship of language to cognitive development. Understanding of these issues is used to promote a school environment that honors diverse perspectives and maximizes language learning potential and ensures respect for communities whose languages or varieties of English differ from standard school English. Required for the Reading Interventionist and ESOL endorsements. The initial course in the Reading Interventionist Endorsement sequence and recommended preparation for other language arts offerings.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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ESOL 640 Culturally Responsive Teaching and Learning in the Classroom

Content: This course focuses on using culturally responsive classroom practices to engage learners whose first and/or home language is not English. We will explore how the candidate’s culture and race intersect with learning and teaching. Course content centers on key elements impacting teaching and learning, including race, culture, and language, which will be examined through the lens of classroom practice, school engagement, and community resources that support and build upon student and family assets. Candidates develop strategies to work with significant people in the child's environment in order to support and encourage success in schools. Candidates examine barriers to family involvement and learn strategies to encourage the development of positive working relationships between home and school. Topics for readings and discussion include, race, socio-economics, language, social and cultural capital, language, and immigration.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to a preservice teacher education program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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ESOL 644 Practicum

Content: Supervised, on-site, pre-designed professional experience along with campus seminars involving discussions and presentations. Students explore the essential content knowledge, leadership, collaboration, and research skills of successful educators under the supervision of experienced field and campus supervisors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Practicum to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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ESOL 689 Professional Studies: International Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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ESOL 698 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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ESOL 699 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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ESOL 989 Professional Studies: International Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

Language Arts

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LA 501 Researching and Teaching the Language Arts

Content: Development of a framework, based on a wide range of research findings, from which to make informed decisions about curriculum and teaching approaches that engage students in listening, speaking, reading, and writing experiences that are responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental levels, and cultural contexts. Emphasis on framing teachers' own classroom inquiry through the adoption of habits of teacher research that focus on personal and scholarly reflection.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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LA 504 Bearing Witness: Writing, Documentary Studies, Social Justice

Content: What is the writer's, teacher's, citizen's, or counselor's role in bearing witness? How do we observe, record, and interpret events from the everyday to the unspeakable? In this nonfiction workshop, we'll explore a continuum of creative nonfiction including literary journalism, essay, and memoir. We'll write from our own observations of cultural life, exploring ethical issues as well as style, voice, and literary form. Also listed as WCM-504/604 and CORE-514. listed as WCM 504/604 and CORE 514
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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LA 507 Essay

Content: Participants examine a range of forms from memoir to expository essays inspired by language, cultural issues, and the natural sciences. Approaches explored will include those often associated with fiction: character, setting, and point of view.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 510 Memoir

Content: Writing chapters from one's life story can produce gifts for family, and an important record of community life. In this workshop, we will read short passages from a variety of voices reflecting on lessons learned from life encounters and from interviews we conduct. We will use these passages as prompts for our own writing, leading to a gathering of short life chapters for further reflection and revision over time. No experience necessary, but a willing heart.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 511 Audio Postcards

Content: Drawing on life experience, participants in this workshop will write profiles of personal heroes, encounters with other cultures, moments of creative discovery, and other compact experiences with indelible effects. From these short writings, we will select, deepen, and record our accounts for podcast, and other forms of web-based sharing.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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LA 512 The Gift

Content: How do we maintain self and community in a society driven by market exchange? What are our cultural norms for gifts and reciprocity? How do gifts bind families and communities? How do we discover the "gift of labor," work that satisfies beyond financial compensation? What is the artist's role in a consumer culture? These are among the questions posed by poet Lewis Hyde in his classic study of literary anthropology, The Gift. These are also the questions that motivate our exploration of gifts in this course. We take Hyde's questions as springboards from which to launch our own investigation of culture, community, gift, story, and work.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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LA 516 Telling Lives

Content: Which stories are ours to tell and which carry us into the terrain of others' lives? Our own stories often intersect with those entrusted to us by family, friends, and strangers; all are shaped by the cultures we inhabit. In this workshop, we'll explore biography, ethnography, journalistic portraits, and documentary writing. Our texts will include our own writing as well as works by various writers and practitioners in documentary inquiry.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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LA 518 Healing Power of Story

Content: The hardest times in life can make you "voiceless," but also offer the greatest opportunity for stories. At these times the invitation to tell someone your story can be a critical encouragement in the healing process. As caregivers, teachers, counselors, parents, nurses, doctors, and patients, we will look at our own stories and those of others to practice strength and healing. Through writing, we will explore the uses of journals, fiction, essays, and poetry in the telling and receiving of stories.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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LA 521 Telling Your Story in Documentary Film

Content: Learn the basics of film production and create an original 5-10 minute documentary in this hands-on workshop. Under the guidance of award-winning filmmakers, students will team up to outline, shoot, and edit their own documentary shorts. This collaborative workshop is intended for first-time and intermediate filmmakers, and includes classes on story structure and production. Final projects will be screened at the Homegrown DocFest a the end of the term.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-1.5 semester hours.

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LA 522 Imaginative Writing Seminar: Works in Progress

Content: Open to graduate students and to writers, filmmakers, digital storytellers, and creators in other media, this seminar is a collaborative studio for completing creative work, which also serves as the capstone course for the Certificate in Documentary Studies. The seminar directs the energies of the seminar community on the development of individual works in progress, with reference to the best in contemporary writing and documentary expressions in other media.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 524 Writing in Response to Literature

Content: Increasing teachers' understanding of reader response theory and methodology to support writing in response to literature. Participants will have the opportunity to experience strategies that support informal and formal writing about literature as well as develop and demonstrate teaching strategies and assessment tools that are responsive to middle school and high school students' individual differences, interests, developmental levels, and cultural contexts.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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LA 526 Reading Other Voices

Content: This course will bring together graduate students and educators and counselors from the community to find ways to incorporate culturally sensitive texts in their work. We will draw from a variety of texts that address differences in race and culture such as Pam Munoz Ryan's Esperanza Rising, Sandra Cisneros's Woman Hollering Creek, Khaled Hosseini's The Kite Runner, Sherman Alexie's Ten Little Indians. We will write from our own cultural backgrounds to uncover how our worldview shapes the reading of works made unfamiliar by different notions of self and community, time, religious and social values. Reading and writing together, we will experience the richness and multiple dimensions of language itself.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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LA 527 Fiction

Content: This workshop is for writers who want to explore or refine the craft of fiction writing in a nurturing and challenging environment. We will read short fiction and discuss-different aspects of storytelling including conflict, plot, character development, atmosphere, point of view and dialogue. Works-in-progress-will be developed through individual conferences with the instructor and in class-discussion.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 530 Children's Writing

Content: Teaching writing to children. Explores ways to create an environment for teaching writing as a process. Teachers read from whole language and writing process theorists and examine ways to implement writing instruction that is responsive to elementary students' individual differences, interests, developmental levels, and cultural contexts.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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LA 531 Writing and the Writing Process

Content: Increasing teachers' understanding of the writing process, primarily by working on their own prose writing. Students write, read their work to peers, and receive feedback. This personal experience provides opportunities to reflect on common writing problems and issues teachers across disciplines encounter in their classrooms. Topics include recent research and theory in composing as well as practical teaching techniques that can be integrated to enhance learners' experiences. Required introductory course in the Secondary Program.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to the Secondary Program.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 533 Field Notes: Observation and Reflection in the Natural World

Content: In a time of increasing attention to human responsibility for the Earth, we begin with the question for teachers and counselors: What are best connections to the natural world—for success as learners, and health as human beings? Writers, scientists, artists, educators, and counselors provide a rich array of responses. Participants will observe nature, begin to practice field notes, and consider opportunities in teaching and counseling practice to attend to right relation with the Earth. Also listed as as WCM 513/613 and ED 536.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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LA 535 Cultural Journalism

Content: Based on community-based education as developed at the Foxfire Project in Georgia, this workshop will emphasize a project approach to teaching and learning. Educators will explore ways to fulfill and go beyond their mandated curriculum, and give students a voice in planning what happens in the classroom. In experiential education students make connections between work at school and the real world and produce a product valued by an audience outside the classroom.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 536 Digital Storytelling

Content: How can teachers, counselors, and others tell stories from their work by combining word, image, and tune? This workshop is a studio experience to assist participants in designing and producing a three- to five-minute digital story that joins narrative, images, and music. Participants craft and record first-person narratives; collect still images, video, and music to deepen the narrative; and follow a process through peer response and instructor support to edit their stories.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 538 Daily Writing in the Spirit of William Stafford

Content: You don't eat just once every few days. You don't speak just every week or so. Learning is continuous, and hunger is closer to breathing than to an annual rite. So why not write daily? In this workshop, we will feed on examples from the daily writing of William Stafford, and practice in the spirit of his work. The emphasis will be on the process of creation: creating texts the length of poems but for use in multiple genres. The goal will be to know what it feels like—in the body and in acts of sustaining witness—to practice the continuous writing life you have imagined.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 544 Practicum

Content: Supervised, on-site, pre-designed professional experience along with campus seminars involving discussions and presentations. Students explore the essential content knowledge, leadership, collaboration, and research skills of successful educators under the supervision of experienced field and campus supervisors.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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LA 545 Exploring Life Stories: The Art of the Interview

Content: Writers, oral historians, ethnographers, teachers, counselors, and families recording their stories all rely on interviews. In this workshop, we'll learn the interviewer's skills: how to listen and observe, frame questions, index and transcribe. We'll write together to bring the interviews to life on the page. We'll examine individual and social memory as well as ethical and political issues. We'll also explore the use of interviews in community projects and as the foundation of documentary studies.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 551 Approaches to Teaching Shakespeare

Content: Four plays by Shakespeare, starting with Othello. Students jointly choose the other three. Students use traditional literary analysis and newer performance-based approaches as they deepen their understanding of Shakespeare and gain techniques for teaching approaches that engage students in meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental levels, and cultural contexts.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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LA 564 Curriculum and Inquiry: Language Arts

Content: Organizing and applying appropriate curriculum and teaching approaches to engage middle-level and high school students in meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental readiness, and cultural contexts. Attention to research in language arts curriculum and pedagogy. Candidates continue to develop as teacher researchers by refining habits of personal and scholarly reflection that examine their professional practice. Topics include backward design in support of planning and assessment; review and application of curriculum materials; social and political contexts that impact curriculum; exploration of the role of inquiry in language arts; and continued analysis and application of best practice methodology. Candidates complete the edTPA portfolio.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Program.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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LA 565 Literature for Children and Adolescents

Content: Exploration of literature for children and adolescents as a healthy, growing body of work and as an important resource for teachers. Class-members investigate available literature, specific authors and illustrators, and their processes of composing. Participants also explore ways to incorporate a rich diet of literary experiences into their students' learning environments in support of meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental levels, and cultural contexts.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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LA 566 Literacy I: Introduction to Pre-K-8 Language Arts

Content: Literacy processes and children's language and literacy development from Pre-K through middle grades. Focus is on theoretical foundations of literacy and meaning-centered instructional practices. Introduces students to a range of culturally responsive instruction, assessment approaches, and lesson structures.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to ECEL program.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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LA 567 Literacy II: Planning in the Language Arts Pre-K-8

Content: Planning for instruction that supports children's language and literacy development from Pre-K through the middle grades. Focus is on theoretical foundations of literacy, meaning construction across-symbol systems, early reading and writing behavior, meaning centered instructional practices, and knowledge and instructional practices relating to word recognition skills and comprehension processes. Includes a wide range of culturally responsive practices, assessment approaches, and materials to promote literacy learning, as well as the concept of media literacy. Children's literature will be integrated as it pertains to the content of this course.
Prerequisites: LA 566.
Restrictions: Admission to Early Childhood/Elementary Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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LA 568 Literacy III: Language Arts Development Pre-K-8

Content: Conclusion of literacy course sequence. Focus is on culturally responsive practices, assessment approaches and instructional practices for literacy development in grades Pre-K-8. Gives increased attention to fluent readers, instruction in the intermediate and middle grades, classroom organization and implementation, methods for assessing students' reading and writing performance, diagnosis of individual needs, and strategies for linking assessment results with appropriate curriculum and instruction across the content areas.
Prerequisites: LA 566 and LA 567.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary - Multiple Subjects Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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LA 570 Readers' Workshop: Coming of Age

Content: Intensive seminar in which students experience a variety of formats for discussion of and written response to literature. Participants read selections of literature based on an author or theme, as well as titles of their choice. Through active participation in the workshop, students explore the transactional nature of reading, and ways to implement teaching approaches introduced in elementary-, middle-, and high-school classrooms in support of meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental levels, and cultural contexts.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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LA 574 Personal Voice in Professional Writing

Content: A workshop to explore the power of writing to engage diverse perspectives, ideas, and cultures at the restless boundary between personal insight and professional practice. In our search for equity, social justice, and inclusion, collaborative writing in professional life may be the most important writing we do. As educators our own writing is our best teacher, as counselors our written reflections will give us our best advice, and as leaders our work will be improved by writing about the challenges we face. To foster expressive clarity, the class as a writing community examines reading, collaboration, personal voice, critical thinking, and audience.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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LA 576 Special Studies: Northwest Writing Institute

Content: This course uses writing as a tool for inquiry and creative expression. Taught with varying emphases based on the cultural moment, the course offers Graduate Students and community members practice with writing, and reflection on the chapters in a life, and investigates how the practice of writing can deepen vocation. Students write in a learning community, and share works in progress. Offered in varied formats-meeting weekends, monthly over two terms, or in a traditional structure-to meet the needs of adult learners.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 579 Teaching Language Arts to Adolescents

Content: Teaching and learning English language arts in middle-level and high school classrooms. Develops candidates' pedagogical content knowledge by focusing on a student-centered view of teaching literature and composition to adolescents. Candidates read about, discuss, and experience the importance of writing to learning and discovery, the student-teacher conference, writing process in theory and practice, the evaluation of writing, the place of writing in literature classes, and the powerful current that can be transmitted among teenage writers. Drawing on reader-response theory, candidates learn how they can encourage students to respond to texts and lead them from those first responses into analysis of both the text itself and their reading of it. Based on the tenets of backward design, the course looks at planning, organization, and assessment--articulating objectives and linking them to standards, teaching, and assessment. Introduces differentiation of instruction in support of meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental levels, and cultural contexts. Candidates write the teaching plan for their December teaching.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Program or consent of instructor.
Credits: 4 semester hours.

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LA 589 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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LA 592 Oregon Writing Project: Workshop in Teaching Writing

Content: The four-week Invitational Summer Institute provides a supportive, dialogic environment in which to explore possibilities as writers, teachers and leaders. The theory and practice of writing are examined through individual demonstrations, reading and discussion of current research, and writing and sharing in writing response groups. Twenty-five K-12 participants develop their leadership potential for a variety of roles, including local school/district reform efforts that support the education and success of all of Oregon's diverse student population. Social justice and social action undergird the experience in an attempt to embrace democratic ideals.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Participants must submit an application and have an interview to be accepted into this program.
Credits: 7 semester hours.

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LA 594 Oregon Writing Project: Practicum in Teaching Writing

Content: After the camaraderie of the Summer Institute, too often teachers return to the isolation of their classroom. But you can reclaim your institute community in the Saturday Seminars. Whether you long for the laughter and tears of teachers sharing stories, or you miss a community of teacher writers who seek to increase their students' love for writing or their ability to punctuate, you will fill your needs in the Saturday Seminars. Saturday Seminars are a year-long series of 3-hour workshops facilitated by OWP Director Linda Christensen, co-directors and teacher consultants. This class will focus on practical classroom strategies and discussions that help develop students as writers as well as teachers as writers. Topics vary from session to session, but each will include time for teacher writing and reflection as well as a framework or lesson to take back to the classroom.
Prerequisites: ED 592/692.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 598 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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LA 599 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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LA 604 Bearing Witness: Writing, Documentary Studies, Social Justice

Content: What is the writer's, teacher's, or counselor's role in bearing witness? How do we observe, record, and interpret events from the everyday to the unspeakable? In this nonfiction workshop, we'll explore a continuum of creative nonfiction including literary journalism, essay, and memoir. We'll write from our own observations of cultural life, exploring ethical issues as well as style, voice, and literary form.
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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LA 607 Essay

Content: Participants examine a range of forms from memoir to expository essays inspired by language, cultural issues, and the natural sciences. Approaches explored will include those often associated with fiction: character, setting, and point of view.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 611 Audio Postcards

Content: Drawing on life experience, participants in this workshop will write profiles of personal heroes, encounters with other cultures, moments of creative discovery, and other compact experiences with indelible effects. From these short writings, we will select, deepen, and record our accounts for podcast, and other forms of web-based sharing.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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LA 612 The Gift

Content: How do we maintain self and community in a society driven by market exchange? What are our cultural norms for gifts and reciprocity? How do gifts bind families and communities? How do we discover the "gift of labor," work that satisfies beyond financial compensation? What is the artist's role in a consumer culture? These are among the questions posed by poet Lewis Hyde in his classic study of literary anthropology, The Gift. These are also the questions that motivate our exploration of gifts in this course. We take Hyde's questions as springboards from which to launch our own investigation of culture, community, gift, story, and work.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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LA 616 Telling Lives

Content: Which stories are ours to tell and which carry us into the terrain of others' lives? Our own stories often intersect with those entrusted to us by family, friends, and strangers; all are shaped by the cultures we inhabit. In this workshop, we'll explore biography, ethnography, journalistic portraits, and documentary writing. Our texts will include our own writing as well as works by various writers and practitioners in documentary inquiry.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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LA 621 Telling Your Story in Documentary Film

Content: Learn the basics of film production and create an original 5-10 minute documentary in this hands-on workshop. Under the guidance of award-winning filmmakers, students will team up to outline, shoot, and edit their own documentary shorts. This collaborative workshop is intended for first-time and intermediate filmmakers, and includes classes on story structure and production. Final projects will be screened at the Homegrown DocFest at the end of the term.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-1.5 semester hours.

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LA 627 Fiction

Content: This workshop is for writers who want to explore or refine the craft of fiction writing in a nurturing and challenging environment. We will read short fiction and discuss-different aspects of storytelling including conflict, plot, character development, atmosphere, point of view and dialogue. Works-in-progress-will be developed through individual conferences with the instructor and in class-discussion.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 630 Memoir

Content: Writing chapters from one's life story can produce gifts for family, and an important record of community life. In this workshop, we will read short passages from a variety of voices reflecting on lessons learned from life encounters and from interviews we conduct. We will use these passages as prompts for our own writing, leading to a gathering of short life chapters for further reflection and revision over time. No experience necessary, but a willing heart.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 632 Researching and Teaching the Language Arts

Content: Development of a framework, based on a wide range of research findings, from which to make informed decisions about curriculum and teaching approaches that engage students in listening, speaking, reading, and writing experiences that are responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental levels, and cultural contexts. Emphasis on framing teachers' own classroom inquiry through the adoption of habits of teacher research that focus on personal and scholarly reflection.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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LA 638 Daily Writing in the Spirit of William Stafford

Content: You don't eat just once every few days. You don't speak just every week or so. Learning is continuous, and hunger is closer to breathing than to an annual rite. So why not write daily? In this workshop, we will feed on examples from the daily writing of William Stafford, and practice in the spirit of his work. The emphasis will be on the process of creation: creating texts the length of poems but for use in multiple genres. The goal will be to know what it feels like—in the body and in acts of sustaining witness—to practice the continuous writing life you have imagined.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 639 Special Studies: Oregon Writing Project

Content: Oregon Writing Project courses focus on the teaching of writing. Writing is essential to success--in school and the workplace. Yet writing is a skill that cannot be learned on the spot; it is complex and challenging. Our courses are taught with varying emphases based on grade level, content area, or specific genres. All of our courses help teach students to write in all subjects with clarity and style, seek deeper and more critical understanding of writing and the world, wake up their own voice and authority, take command of their own learning, and manage portfolios and other exhibition forms.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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LA 644 Practicum

Content: Supervised, on-site, pre-designed professional experience along with campus seminars involving discussions and presentations. Students explore the essential content knowledge, leadership, collaboration, and research skills of successful educators under the supervision of experienced field and campus supervisors.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

Print This Course

LA 646 Exploring Life Stories: The Art of the Interview

Content: Writers, oral historians, ethnographers, teachers, counselors, families recording their stories all rely on interviews. In this workshop, we'll learn the interviewer's skills: how to listen and observe, frame questions, index and transcribe. We'll write together to bring the interviews to life on the page. We'll examine individual and social memory as well as ethical and political issues. We'll also explore the use of interviews in community projects and as the foundation of documentary studies.
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 676 Special Studies: Northwest Writing Institute

Content: This course uses writing as a tool for inquiry and creative expression. Taught with varying emphases based on the cultural moment, the course offers Graduate Students and community members practice with writing, and reflection on the chapters in a life, and investigates how the practice of writing can deepen vocation. Students write in a learning community, and share works in progress. Offered in varied formats-meeting weekends, monthly over two terms, or in a traditional structure-to meet the needs of adult learners.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 689 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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LA 690 Imaginative Writing Seminar: Works in Progress

Content: Open to graduate students and to writers, filmmakers, digital storytellers, and creators in other media, this seminar is a collaborative studio for completing creative work, which also serves as the capstone course for the Certificate in Documentary Studies. The seminar directs the energies of the seminar community in the development of individual works in progress, with reference to the best in contemporary writing and documentary expressions in other media. Also listed as WCM 522/622.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 692 Oregon Writing Project: Workshop in Teaching Writing

Content: The four-week Invitational Summer Institute provides a supportive, dialogic environment in which to explore possibilities as writers, teachers and leaders. The theory and practice of writing are examined through individual demonstrations, reading and discussion of current research, and writing and sharing in writing response groups. Twenty-five K-12 participants develop their leadership potential for a variety of roles, including local school/district reform efforts that support the education and success of all of Oregon's diverse student population. Social justice and social action undergird the experience in an attempt to embrace democratic ideals.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Participants must submit an application and have an interview to be accepted into this program.
Credits: 7 semester hours.

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LA 694 Oregon Writing Project: Practicum in Teaching Writing

Content: After the camaraderie of the Summer Institute, too often teachers return to the isolation of their classroom. But you can reclaim your institute community in the Saturday Seminars. Whether you long for the laughter and tears of teachers sharing stories, or you miss a community of teacher writers who seek to increase their students' love for writing or their ability to punctuate, you will fill your needs in the Saturday Seminars. Saturday Seminars are a year-long series of 3-hour workshops facilitated by OWP Director Linda Christensen, OWP co-directors, and teacher consultants. This class will focus on practical classroom strategies and discussions that help develop students as writers as well as teachers as writers. Topics vary from session to session, but each will include time for teacher writing and reflection as well as a framework or lesson to take back to the classroom.
Prerequisites: ED 592/692.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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LA 698 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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LA 699 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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LA 989 Professional Studies: International Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

Reading

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READ 500 Language Acquisition and Development

Content: Theories of how first and second languages (written and spoken) are acquired, the importance of first-language development and its relationship to the acquisition of other languages, and the relationship of language to cognitive development. Understanding of these issues is used to promote a school environment that honors diverse perspectives and maximizes language learning potential and ensures respect for communities whose languages or varieties of English differ from standard school English. Required for the Reading Interventionist and ESOL endorsements. The initial course in the Reading Interventionist endorsement sequence and recommended preparation for other language arts offerings.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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READ 502 Innovations in Reading

Content: Organizing, managing, and evaluating both classroom and school-wide K-12 reading programs. Students examine the textbook adoption process, participate in the development and use of a tool for evaluating reading texts, assess components of reading and writing programs, and learn to integrate reading and writing processes throughout the school grades to extend learners' experiences and enhance their own and students' capacities to solve literacy problems. This capstone course of the Reading Intervention program must be taken at the end of the sequence.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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READ 521 READ Practicum

Content: Classroom work with the support of a mentor who holds a Reading Intervention endorsement. Practicum candidates work in their own classrooms with a focus on reading instruction and assessment. As part of the practicum, candidates are assigned a mentor and a supervisor. The supervisor will conduct two observations. One observation is focused on reading instruction. One observation is focused on in-class reading assessment. The supervisor fills out an observation report/rubric. The supervisor conducts two triad meetings with the candidate and mentor, focusing on the observation report and rubric (areas of conversation include reading instruction practices and reading assessment practices such as data collection/use of data). Candidates are also required to successfully complete a work sample assignment as part of the Reading Intervention endorsement.
Prerequisites: READ 502/620 and READ 532/625
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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READ 532 Assessing Reading Strategies

Content: Exploration of reading assessment strategies. Topics include a language orientation for diagnosing reading problems, diverse causes and correlates of reading difficulties, assessment procedures in reading, and strategies to facilitate readers' improvement. Each participant assesses a reader, develops a profile of personal strategies, and designs and implements an instructional plan to help the reader develop effective, efficient reading strategies responsive to individual differences, interests, and developmental levels. Participants consider reading issues for students at all levels.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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READ 534 Reading Comprehension: Theory and Practical Application

Content: In-depth exploration of current models and trends in reading comprehension and its cognitive and linguistic components. Students read widely from professional journals, explore and reflect on their personal reading processes, and do theoretical and practical projects to further their understanding. Examines factors that contribute to reading difficulty (from early childhood through adulthood), as well as important issues and questions about standardized tests, observational diagnostics, readability formulas, and the effectiveness and theoretical validity of published programs.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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READ 565 Literature for Children and Adolescents

Content: Exploration of literature for children and adolescents as a healthy, growing body of work and as an important resource for teachers. Class-members investigate available literature, specific authors and illustrators, and their processes of composing. Participants also explore ways to incorporate a rich diet of literary experiences into their students' learning environments in support of meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental levels, and cultural contexts.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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READ 613 Literature for Children and Adolescents

Content: Exploration of literature for children and adolescents as a healthy, growing body of work and as an important resource for teachers. Class members investigate available literature, specific authors and illustrators, and their processes of composing. Participants also explore ways to incorporate a rich diet of literary experiences into their students' learning environments in support of meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental levels, and cultural contexts.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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READ 614 Reading Comprehension: Theory and Practical Application

Content: In-depth exploration of current models and trends in reading comprehension and its cognitive and linguistic components. Students read widely from professional journals, explore and reflect on their personal reading processes, and do theoretical and practical projects to further their understanding. Examines factors that contribute to reading difficulty (from early childhood through adulthood), as well as important issues and questions about standardized tests, observational diagnostics, readability formulas, and the effectiveness and theoretical validity of published programs.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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READ 620 Innovations in Reading

Content: Organizing, managing, and evaluating both classroom and school-wide K-12 reading programs. Students examine the textbook adoption process, participate in the development and use of a tool for evaluating reading texts, assess components of reading and writing programs, and learn to integrate reading and writing processes throughout the school grades to extend learners' experiences and enhance their own and students' capacities to solve literacy problems. This capstone course of the Reading Intervention program must be taken at the end of the sequence.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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READ 621 READ Practicum

Content: Classroom work with the support of a mentor who holds a Reading Intervention endorsement. Practicum candidates work in their own classrooms with a focus on reading instruction and assessment. As part of the practicum, candidates are assigned a mentor and a supervisor. The supervisor will conduct two observations. One observation is focused on reading instruction. One observation is focused on in-class reading assessment. The supervisor fills out an observation report/rubric. The supervisor conducts two triad meetings with the candidate and mentor, focusing on the observation report and rubric (areas of conversation include reading instruction practices and reading assessment practices such as data collection/use of data). Candidates are also required to successfully complete a work sample assignment as part of the Reading Intervention endorsement.
Prerequisites: READ 502/620 and READ 532/625
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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READ 625 Assessing Reading Strategies

Content: Exploration of reading assessment strategies. Topics include a language orientation for diagnosing reading problems, diverse causes and correlates of reading difficulties, assessment procedures in reading, and strategies to facilitate readers' improvement. Each participant assesses a reader, develops a profile of personal strategies, and designs and implements an instructional plan to help the reader develop effective, efficient reading strategies responsive to individual differences, interests, and developmental levels. Participants consider reading issues for students at all levels.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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READ 634 Language Acquisition and Development

Content: Theories of how first and second languages (written and spoken) are acquired, the importance of first-language development and its relationship to the acquisition of other languages, and the relationship of language to cognitive development. Understanding of these issues is used to promote a school environment that honors diverse perspectives and maximizes language learning potential and ensures respect for communities whose languages or varieties of English differ from standard school English. Required for the Reading Interventionist and ESOL endorsements. The initial course in the Reading Interventionist endorsement sequence and recommended preparation for other language arts offerings.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

Mathematics

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MATH 502 Probability and Statistics for the Common Core

Content: Designed specifically for K-12 teachers of mathematics, this course aims to build foundational as well as pedogical content knowledge in the following topic areas: elements of statistics; organizing, displaying and describing data; probability; distributions; sampling; prediction; estimation; correlation; linear regression. Special attention will be given to the Common Core State Standards for mathematics and the role of probability and statistics for all grade levels. Participants will have an opportunity to analyze data sets from a variety of sources using Texas Instruments graphing calculators and Fathom statistical software as tools throughout the course.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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MATH 522 Experiencing Geometry

Content: Providing a broad content knowledge perspective on classical and modern as well as euclidean and noneuclidean geometries, this course takes an inquiry-based approach to learning mathematics through open-ended problems. Participants learn to create experiential learning environments that build on their students' ideas, to encourage diverse opinion, to use hands-on explorations, to develop non-test assessments, and to incorporate a range of technological resources toward the end of experiencing geometry.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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MATH 525 Pedagogy of Inquiry: Mathematics as Problem Solving

Content: Prepares K-12 mathematics educators to incorporate inquiry and problem solving throughout their pedagogy and practice. Content from geometry, measurement, number, algebra as well as probability and statistics provide context for this perspective on teaching mathematics as a way of thinking. The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics serve as the framework for curriculum planning and assessment. Emphasizes instructional methods that engage students in meaningful learning, respond to individual differences, and leverage social justice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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MATH 527 Algebra for All

Content: Increasingly in our democracy, informed citizens must demonstrate not only fluency with the fundamentals of algebra, but also the capacity to think algebraically. This course explores strategies that support all K-12 students in mastering such skills prior to high school graduation. Participants will review relevant research, explore the history of algebra in the American curriculum, generate multiple-solution pathways for every algebra problem, and examine instructional practices that foster the teaching and learning of algebra throughout a student's mathematical career, all leading to the development of their own robust toolkit for the teaching and learning of algebra.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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MATH 544 Practicum

Content: Supervised, on-site, pre-designed professional experience along with campus seminars involving discussions and presentations. Students explore the essential content knowledge, leadership, collaboration, and research skills of successful educators under the supervision of experienced field and campus supervisors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Practicum to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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MATH 549 Algebra and Geometry for Elementary - Multiple Subjects Teachers

Content: Explores older children's development of mathematical concepts. Promotes a problem solving stance, through which students explore a wide range or topics—including proportional reasoning, data analysis, algebraic thinking, and geometry. Priority is placed on ideas that serve as capstones of elementary mathematics as well as cornerstones of secondary mathematics, with an emphasis on developing strategies for equitable teaching of algebra to all students.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to the Elementary—Multiple Subjects Program or consent of instructor required.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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MATH 564 Curriculum and Inquiry: Mathematics

Content: Organizing and applying appropriate curriculum and teaching approaches to engage middle-level and high school students in meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental readiness, and cultural contexts. Attention to research and theory in mathematics curriculum and pedagogy. Candidates continue to develop as teacher researchers by refining habits of personal and scholarly reflection that examine their professional practice. Topics include: backward design, in support of planning and assessment; review and application of curriculum materials and resources; social and political contexts that impact curriculum; the role of inquiry in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education; the value of math-science integration; and mathematical literacy for the 21st century. Candidates complete the edTPA portfolio.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Program or consent of instructor.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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MATH 566 Math for Early Childhood

Content: Introduction to mathematical concepts for grades pre-K through three including number and operations, geometry, and measurement in a problem-solving context. Individually and culturally responsive mathematics instructional strategies and assessments for early childhood are examined and demonstrated throughout the course. Course content is aligned to Oregon standards and current national recommendations including the Principles and Standards from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the Common Core State Standards. Children's literature will be integrated as it pertains to the content of this course.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary - Multiple Subjects Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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MATH 567 Elementary School Mathematics

Content: Introduction to mathematical concepts for grades three through six including rational numbers, proportional reasoning, geometry, and measurement in a problem-solving context. Students will examine and demonstrate individually and culturally responsive mathematics instructional strategies and assessments for elementary grades. Course content is aligned to Oregon standards and current national recommendations including the Principles and Standards from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the Common Core State Standards.
Prerequisites: MATH 566.
Restrictions: Admission to the Elementray - Multiple Subjects Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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MATH 568 Mathematics Assessment for Learning

Content: Intensive application of assessment for improving instruction in the mathematics classroom. Students will demonstrate proficiency creating and using a variety of culturally and linguistically responsive assessment strategies including assessment interviews, formative, and summative lesson and unit assessments. Students will use their assessment data to plan and teach re-engagement lessons and reflect on the outcomes of these lessons.
Prerequisites: MATH 567.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary - Multiple Subjects Program.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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MATH 579 Teaching Mathematics to Adolescents

Content: Teaching and learning mathematics in middle-level and high school classrooms. Emphasizes meaningful development of mathematical concepts, from pre-algebra through calculus, for the purposes of teaching. Focuses on the importance of cultivating student voice and building from students' prior knowledge through open-ended problem solving and inquiry-based experiences. Supports a view of mathematics as the science of patterns, a way of thinking that all students must embrace in order to fully access democracy in the 21st century. Candidates learn about national standards for school mathematics in grades 6-12 as well as the range of research informing best practices in math education. Particular attention is given to issues of equity, differentiation, culturally relevant pedagogy, assessment, and backward design. Incorporates the use of technology (especially TI-graphing calculators and dynamic geometry software) as tools for deepening mathematical understanding. Candidates write the teaching plan for their December teaching.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Preservice Program or consent of instructor.
Credits: 4 semester hours.

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MATH 589 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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MATH 598 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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MATH 599 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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MATH 644 Practicum

Content: Supervised, on-site, pre-designed professional experience along with campus seminars involving discussions and presentations. Students explore the essential content knowledge, leadership, collaboration, and research skills of successful educators under the supervision of experienced field and campus supervisors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Practicum to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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MATH 689 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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MATH 698 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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MATH 699 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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MATH 989 Professional Studies: International Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

Science

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SCI 544 Practicum

Content: Supervised, on-site, pre-designed professional experience along with campus seminars involving discussions and presentations. Students explore the essential content knowledge, leadership, collaboration, and research skills of successful educators under the supervision of experienced field and campus supervisors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Practicum to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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SCI 555 Field Natural History

Content: The study of nature from aesthetic, historic, and scientific perspectives, with emphasis on the biological diversity of the Pacific Northwest. Students engage in fieldwork and biological monitoring at an introductory level, learn styles of nature writing, and explore how to introduce children to holistic study of their surroundings. Nature appreciation and understanding of biological adaptations receive balanced treatment within a framework of how humans have conceptualized nature through time.
Prerequisites: None.
Corequisites: None.
Restrictions: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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SCI 564 Curriculum and Inquiry: Science

Content: Organizing and applying appropriate curricular and teaching approaches to engage middle level and high school students in meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental readiness, and cultural contexts. Attention to research and theory in science curriculum and pedagogy. Candidates continue to develop as teacher researchers by refining habits of personal and scholarly reflection that examine their professional practice. Topics include: backward design, in support of planning and assessment; review and application of curriculum approaches, materials, and resources; social and political contexts that impact curriculum; exploration of the role of inquiry in science; the importance of scientific literacy; and the value of math-science integration. Candidates complete the edTPA portfolio.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Program.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SCI 579 Teaching Science to Adolescents

Content: Teaching and learning science in middle-level and high school classrooms. Emphasizes the design of investigations, safety, and the role of using a wide variety of science activities in science teaching. Includes planning, organization, and assessment of science teaching and learning, using the tenets of backward design. Pays attention to differentiation of instruction for student needs, articulation of objectives, and their link to teaching, standards, and assessment. Introduces participants to the importance of science as the work of a particular cultural community with shared values and linguistic norms, while examining literature about the challenge students may face in making a "cultural border crossing" into science. Special attention is given to diversity and social justice issues. Materials draw upon research from the history and philosophy of science as well as research about the psychology of learning science, with particular attention to the "human constructivist" views and adolescent development. Candidates write the teaching plan for their December teaching.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Preservice Program or consent of instructor.
Credits: 4 semester hours.

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SCI 580 Teaching Children About the Natural World

Content: Promoting children's understanding of the natural world using everyday materials and observations of living things in the local environment. Participants examine their own, as well as children's, intuitive science notions, while learning to craft safe classroom inquiries and field investigations. The course focuses attention on children's use of language in the context of learning about science and nature as well as the development of inquiry skills.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary—Multiple Subjects Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SCI 589 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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SCI 595 Physical Science

Content: Imaginative inquiry in physics and chemistry with careful attention to laboratory safety and intriguing connections among everyday experiences. Topics may include stability and equilibrium, force and balance, sound and vibration, light and shadow, simple electrical circuits, corrosion, chemical and physical changes, acids and bases, and material properties. Provides guidance in preparing classroom science activities and emphasizes the joy of science. Consideration of teacher content knowledge, modeling of teaching approaches, and availability of educational resources fundamental to successful instruction in physical science.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SCI 596 Earth/Space Science

Content: Learning to investigate and appreciate landscape changes and celestial events that occur on scales beyond ordinary experience. Students join in evenings of sky-watching and engage in geological field study of the regional landscape. Participants should be prepared for physical activity during the field component of the course. Addresses teacher content knowledge, modeling of teaching approaches, and availability of educational resources fundamental to successful instruction in earth and space science.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SCI 597 Life Science

Content: Survey of diverse fields such as cell biology, ecology, and genetics, and inquiry activities appropriate for learning science in the school laboratory, with careful attention to health, safety, and ethics. Emphasis on exploration of life science concepts, teaching strategies, and innovative classroom practices. Consideration of teacher content knowledge, modeling of teaching approaches, and availability of educational resources fundamental to successful instruction in life science.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SCI 598 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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SCI 599 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

Social Studies

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SS 516 20th-Century U.S. History: Readings and Curriculum

Content: For teachers of U.S. history or for those who wish to renew previous acquaintance with focal events in 20th-century American history. Students consider changes in history as a discipline, the impact of micro- or quantitative techniques, and how to help students see history as a claim about a record of events. Topics include U.S. reasons for entering World War I, changes in women's work wrought by World War II, the Cuban missile crisis, and desegregation and the civil rights movement. Students learn to integrate fundamental and emergent components of disciplinary knowledge in ways that extend learners' experiences and enhance their own and students' capacities to solve problems. Engages preservice and inservice school personnel in meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental levels, and cultural contexts.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SS 544 Practicum

Content: Supervised, on-site, pre-designed professional experience along with campus seminars involving discussions and presentations. Students explore the essential content knowledge, leadership, collaboration, and research skills of successful educators under the supervision of experienced field and campus supervisors.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Practicum to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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SS 548 Teaching the Geography of Inequality

Content: This course will use the broad lens of geography, which examines the connections between people and place, to better understand the historical foundations of global inequality and how this history intersects with contemporary issues of social and environmental justice. From the impacts of colonialism in Africa to post-industrial urban farming in Detroit, we will look at how 500 years of economic globalization has shaped people, communities, cultures and environments around the world. By looking at specific stories of people and place, we will examine the relationships that exist between human cultures and the environments in which they are situated--and what can happen to people, culture, and the natural world when these relationships are disrupted. By looking at broad themes like colonialism, poverty and development, wealth distribution and population, urbanization, human migration, climate and energy, and food and agriculture, we will try to better understand the interconnections between the structures of our economies and societies, and the health and well being of humans and the planet.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SS 560 Teaching Constitutional Issues

Content: Issues in the field of constitutional law and practice and how to teach these issues in middle and high school. The course covers a definition of rights, the concept of constitutional law, and historical and contemporary issues. Topics include conflict resolution, comparison of the Oregon and U.S. bills of rights, the First Amendment and due process, privacy, students' rights in public schools, and equal treatment and discrimination. Students practice the case method and the mock trial as teaching methods. Students learn to integrate fundamental and emergent components of disciplinary knowledge in ways that extend learners' experiences and enhance their own and students' capacities to solve problems. Engages preservice and inservice school personnel in meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental levels, and cultural contexts. Recommended for teachers at all levels.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SS 564 Curriculum and Inquiry: Social Studies

Content: Organizing and applying appropriate curriculum to engage middle level and high school students in meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental readiness, learning styles, and cultural contexts. Attention to research and theory on social studies curriculum and pedagogy. Candidates continue to develop as teacher researchers by refining habits of personal and scholarly reflection that examine their professional practice. A continued emphasis on backward design in support of planning and assessment. A variety of social studies lessons are modeled including: leading discussions, using primary documents, role playing, visual literacy, non-linguistic organization, and document-based questions. Candidates complete the edTPA portfolio.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Program.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SS 578 Social Studies for Elementary Teachers

Content: Understanding and applying inquiry and assessment within a social and cultural framework that leads to thematic curriculum development for pre-K through middle school. Participants explore children's intuitive notions and reasoning about social, cultural, and geographic worlds from developmental, social, historical, and cultural perspectives. Topics include intercultural communication and the traditions and contributions of various groups to American culture, diversity, democracy, and civic life, with special focus on Oregon and the Northwest. Students are guided in teaching and assessment practices that draw from children's questions and interests. Children's literature will be integrated as it pertains to the content of this course.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Elementary - Multiple Subjects program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SS 579 Teaching Social Studies to Adolescents

Content: Developing a conceptual framework for teaching social studies in a democratic society through a social justice framework. Focuses on different ways of organizing instruction and assessing learning in middle- and high-school content areas. Candidates examine historical and contemporary issues in teaching social studies, including philosophy, content, and method. Includes planning, organization, and assessment in subject areas. Pays attention to national and state standards and differentiation of instruction, linking them to teaching and assessment. Engages teaching candidates in meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental levels, and cultural contexts. Candidates learn to assess, document, and advocate for the successful learning of all students and school stakeholders. Candidates write the teaching plan for their December teaching.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to Secondary Preservice Program.
Credits: 4 semester hours.

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SS 585 Political Geography of the Middle East

Content: Overview of the Middle East in an international context. Considers the legacy of colonialism and the impact of the new imperialism; socioeconomic, political, and cultural dynamics within the region; the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; the role of energy resources; and the clash of paradigms. Covers the U.S. invasion of Iraq and Afghanistan as well as U.S. hegemony and counter-hegemonic resistance to it. Considers the region as a focal point for intercapitalist rivalries.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SS 589 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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SS 592 Integrating Economics Into U.S. History

Content: Models of economic thought--including classical economists, Marxists, and modern Keynesians--and their relation to topics addressed in U.S. history, government, and current events or contemporary issues courses. How and why have structural economic changes influenced society, politics, and culture in teachers' own areas of interest? Topics include the impact of Adam Smith on early American political thought, the role of market forces in 19th-century labor and populist political issues, mass production and mass consumption, the relevance of Keynes' ideas to the Great Depression and the New Deal, and economic origins of American foreign policy. Students learn to integrate fundamental and emergent components of disciplinary knowledge in ways that extend learners' experiences and enhance their own and students' capacities to solve problems. Engages preservice and inservice school personnel in meaningful learning experiences responsive to individual differences, interests, developmental levels, and cultural contexts.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SS 598 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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SS 989 Professional Studies: International Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

Special Education

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SPED 505 Teaching Students with Exceptionalities in Inclusive School Settings

Content: Who are students with exceptionalities and how do we adapt curriculum to meet their needs? This course addresses characteristics of student exceptionalities, principles and practices for effective planning, approaches to instruction, and options for assessment of all students. It prepares teacher candidates to advocate for appropriate instruction for all students in the least restrictive environment. Emphasis is placed on providing relevant information for the development of individualized education plans (IEPs), planning instruction that is guided by students’ IEPs, and adapting curricula for all learners, including the use of Universal Design for Learning.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to a preservice teacher education program.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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SPED 510 Educating Students with Exceptionalities: Learning and Legal Issues

Content: Analysis of child/adolescent development and the cognitive, linguistic, motor, behavioral, and learning characteristics of individuals with special needs. Topics include characteristics of exceptional learners, special-education history, current policies and procedures based on scientific research, incorporation of technology, and legal issues. Candidates develop or refine a research-based foundation in the education of students with special needs, including the impact of linguistic and cultural variability on special education eligibility and practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 511 Behavior Change Interventions for Students with Serious Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

Content: Study of the developmental backgrounds of students with significant emotional/behavioral problems and practices to help these students develop more productive behaviors. Emphasis on procedures for completing a functional behavior analysis (FBA) and a behavior intervention plan (BIP), research-based interventions including environmental modifications, positive behavior supports and interventions (PBIS), social-skills training, cognitive-behavioral interventions, self-monitoring, contracting, and the use of outside agencies to support the school in assisting students.
Prerequisites: SPED 510/SPED 626.
Restrictions: SPED 510/SPED 626 or consent of instructor.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 513 Assessment and Diagnosis for Students With Exceptionalities

Content: Diagnosis for special education eligibility under state and federal laws and assessment for special education instruction. Special attention is paid to learning disabilities and mental retardation (Intellectual Disabilities). Candidates practice selecting, administering and scoring selected standardized tests; interpreting the scores; and writing reports. Candidates learn about Response to Instruction (RtI), including how to administer Curriculum-Based Measures and how to integrate aspects of a multi-tiered intervention process with standardized assessment tools to create a comprehensive evaluation.
Prerequisites: SPED 510/SPED 626 or advisor consent required.
Corequisites: SPED 545/SPED 645.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SPED 514 Curriculum and Instruction for Students With Exceptionalities

Content: Research-validated curriculum and specially designed instruction for students with disabilities. Based on Common Core State Standards, participants review and adapt general education curricula appropriate to their authorization level to create specially designed instruction that emphasizes and supports progress across academic areas, learning strategies, and appropriate accommodations. This course uses curriculum-based assessment/measurement data to craft effective, substantive, and procedurally correct individualized education plans (IEPs) and specially designed instruction aligned with the Common Core State Standards. Additionally, candidates will demonstrate all skills necessary to facilitate an IEP meeting, including group dynamics and conflict resolution strategies.
Prerequisites: SPED 513/SPED 632.
Corequisites: SPED 546/SPED 646.
Restrictions: SPED 513/SPED 632 or consent of advisor.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SPED 516 Interventions for Students with Severe Needs

Content: Instructional practices to increase the functional performance and academic success of students with severe diagnoses (e.g., autism spectrum disorder, severe intellectual disabilities, or multiple disabilities). Participants learn research-validated strategies with demonstrated effectiveness in increasing communication skills, appropriate behavior, social skills, and life skills. Emphasis is placed on planning for and providing data-driven instruction in the least restrictive environment, working toward and incorporating the Common Core State Standards, and working with paraprofessionals.
Prerequisites: SPED 510/626.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 517 Literacy for Students with Exceptionalities

Content: Curriculum and instructional practices based on validated research for teaching reading and writing to students with disabilities and the Council for Exceptional Children and International Dyslexia Association standards for practice. Topics include the causes and correlates of reading difficulties including dyslexia, research-validated reading curricula, results of the National Reading Panel, models of reading instruction (K-12) emphasizing reading comprehension outcomes, basic reading skills, learning strategy acquisition, and progress monitoring with Specifically Designed Instruction in reading based on the Common Core State Standards.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 520 Advanced Instructional Decision Making

Content: Building on skills developed in the assessment, curriculum, and instruction courses, participants integrate and apply concepts of curriculum and instructional decision making for students with diverse backgrounds and special needs. Focus is on the integration of district-mandated general education curricula, Common Core State Standards and assessments, and research in instructional practices with demonstrated efficacy for students with high-incidence disabilities.
Prerequisites: SPED 514/633 or consent of advisor.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SPED 521 Effective Program Development for Students with Serious Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

Content: Examination of key components of effective programs. Candidates visit and review programs that use different intervention models, including Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS). Candidates study and review delivery systems ranging from consultation models to therapeutic day-treatment programs. Emphasis on creating democratic communities that respond sensitively to students’ social, emotional, and developmental needs and are culturally sensitive. The course focuses on creating appropriate and meaningful learning experiences for these students, including place-based education and real-world problem solving with students who experience emotional and behavior disorders.
Prerequisites: SPED 511/SPED 629 or consent of advisor.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SPED 522 Program Development for Students with Severe Needs

Content: Current practices with demonstrated effectiveness for developing and performing interventions for the benefit of children who have severe disabilities. Emphasis on research-validated practices for students with autism spectrum disorders. Participants review research and models for delivery of services to these students and explore existing programs that cover the entire continuum of special education services as they relate to students with severe learning needs. Emphasis on transition services, including from early intervention programs to school-age programs and post-secondary transition.
Prerequisites: SPED 516/SPED 628.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 523 Special Topics Seminar

Content: Culminating course of the Special Educator M.Ed. Candidates apply research principles in special education. Students integrate and apply what they have learned throughout the program. In consultation with the instructor and class-participants, each student designs a research project that answers important questions related to his or her work with students who have special needs. In association with these projects, class-members determine the content of seminar meetings and speakers invited to discuss-issues selected by the students. ED-509 may be substituted for this course.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Completion of 27 of the 37 semester hours in the Master of Education: Special Education with Endorsement Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 524 Special Education for the General Education Teacher

Content: Study of special-education policies and procedures, as well as the legal, ethical, and professional responsibilities of the elementary classroom teacher. Topics include laws relevant to the education of students with disabilities, including a Free and Appropriate Public Education in the Least Restrictive Environment, court cases that influence practice, special-education processes, and the general-educator's role in each step before, during, and after an individualized education plan (IEP) has been created for a student. Candidates will have the opportunity to observe classroom content in practice in their field placements, learning firsthand the collaborative skills required for successfully educating all children. Emphasis is placed on inclusive, equitable educational practices in schools and communities.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to preservice teacher education program or consent of instructor.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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SPED 535 Special Education: Generalist Endorsement Capstone

Content: This capstone course is an integrated theoretical summary of current special education issues that have direct impact on practitioners. Topics are selected jointly by the faculty and participants, based on participants’ experiences in the Special Education: Generalist Endorsement Program, but will include national and state special education standards, consultation and collaboration skills, and Individual Education Plan (IEP) team facilitation. Focus is on enhancing the preparation of participants for their initial years as special educators who advocate for an equitable education for all students.
Prerequisites: SPED 510, SPED 511, SPED 513, SPED 514, SPED 516, SPED 517,SPED 545, and SPED 546.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 544 Practicum

Content: Designed to provide each participant with observation and feedback concerning essential skills associated with the Special Education: Generalist Endorsement. Classroom observations are collaboratively scheduled by the participant and the practicum supervisor with pre- and post-observation conferences built into each site visit. Participants document time spent modifying curriculum and instruction for students assigned individual education plans (IEPs).
Prerequisites: SPED 510 or SPED 626.
Corequisites: SPED 514 or SPED 633.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Practicum to academic department.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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SPED 545 Practicum I

Content: Supervised, public-school-based professional experience with accompanying seminar. Candidates work under the guidance of a licensed special educator in a pre-K-12 setting under faculty supervision. Seminar topics focus on classroom experiences, particularly those that contribute to candidates’ understanding of the roles, responsibilities, and expectations of special educators, with an emphasis on assessment and progress monitoring.
Prerequisites: SPED 510/SPED 626.
Corequisites: SPED 513/SPED 632.
Restrictions: Consent of program director.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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SPED 546 Practicum II

Content: Supervised, public-school-based professional experience with accompanying seminar. Candidates work under the guidance of a licensed special-educator in a pre-K-12 setting under faculty supervision. Seminar topics focus on classroom experiences, particularly those that contribute to candidates’ understanding of the roles, responsibilities, and expectations of special educators, with an emphasis on curriculum and instruction.
Prerequisites: SPED 510/SPED 626, SPED 545.
Corequisites: SPED 514/SPED 633.
Restrictions: Consent of program director.
Credits: 1-2 semester hours.

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SPED 577 Nutrition

Content: Nutritional aspects in the treatment of eating disorders. Nutritional rehabilitation for underweight clients. Nutritional therapy, intuitive and mindful eating.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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SPED 589 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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SPED 598 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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SPED 599 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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SPED 620 Advanced Instructional Decision Making

Content: Building on skills developed in the assessment, curriculum, and instruction courses, participants integrate and apply concepts of curriculum and instructional decision making for students with diverse backgrounds and special needs. Focus is on the integration of district-mandated general education curricula, Common Core State Standards and assessments, and research in instructional practices with demonstrated efficacy for students with high-incidence disabilities.
Prerequisites: SPED 514, SPED 633 or consent of advisor.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SPED 621 Effective Program Development for Students With Serious Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

Content: Examination of key components of effective programs. Candidates visit and review programs that use different intervention models, including Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS). Candidates study and review delivery systems ranging from consultation models to therapeutic day-treatment programs. Emphasis on creating democratic communities that respond sensitively to students’ social, emotional, and developmental needs and are culturally sensitive. The course focuses on creating appropriate and meaningful learning experiences for these students, including place-based education and real-world problem solving with students who experience emotional and behavior disorders.
Prerequisites: SPED 511/SPED 629 or consent of advisor.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SPED 622 Program Development for Students with Severe Needs

Content: Current practices with demonstrated effectiveness for developing and performing interventions for the benefit of children who have severe disabilities. Emphasis on research-validated practices for students with autism spectrum disorders. Participants review research and models for delivery of services to these students and explore existing programs that cover the entire continuum of special education services as they relate to students with severe learning needs. Emphasis on transition services, including from early intervention programs to school-age programs and post-secondary transition.
Prerequisites: SPED 516/SPED 628.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 623 Special Topics Seminar

Content: Culminating course of the Special Educator M.Ed. Candidates apply research principles in special education. Students integrate and apply what they have learned throughout the program. In consultation with the instructor and class-participants, each student designs a research project that answers important questions related to his or her work with students who have special needs. In association with these projects, class-members determine the content of seminar meetings and speakers invited to discuss-issues selected by the students. ED 509 may be substituted for this course.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Completion of 27 of the 37 semester hours in the Master of Education: Special Education with Endorsement Program.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 626 Educating Students with Exceptionalities: Learning and Legal Issues

Content: Analysis of child/adolescent development and the cognitive, linguistic, motor, behavioral, and learning characteristics of individuals with special needs. Topics include characteristics of exceptional learners, special-education history, current policies and procedures based on scientific research, incorporation of technology, and legal issues. Candidates develop or refine a research-based foundation in the education of students with special needs, including the impact of linguistic and cultural variability on special education eligibility and practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 627 Literacy for Students with Exceptionalities

Content: Curriculum and instructional practices based on validated research for teaching reading and writing to students with disabilities and the Council for Exceptional Children and International Dyslexia Association standards for practice. Topics include the causes and correlates of reading difficulties including dyslexia, research-validated reading curricula, results of the National Reading Panel, programs, models of reading instruction (K-12) emphasizing reading comprehension outcomes, basic reading skills, learning strategy acquisition, and progress monitoring with Specifically Designed Instruction in reading based on the Common Core State Standards.
Prerequisites: SPED 514/SPED 633 or consent of advisor.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 628 Interventions for Students with Severe Needs

Content: Instructional practices to increase the functional performance and academic success of students with severe diagnoses (e.g., autism spectrum disorder, severe intellectual disabilities, or multiple disabilities). Participants learn research-validated strategies with demonstrated effectiveness in increasing communication skills, appropriate behavior, social skills, and life skills. Emphasis is placed on planning for and providing data-driven instruction in the least restrictive environment, working toward and incorporating the Common Core State Standards, and working with paraprofessionals.
Prerequisites: SPED 510/SPED 626.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 629 Behavior Change Interventions for Students With Serious Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

Content: Study of the developmental backgrounds of students with significant emotional/behavioral problems and practices to help these students develop more productive behaviors. Emphasis on procedures for completing a functional behavior analysis (FBA) and a behavior intervention plan (BIP), research-based interventions including environmental modifications, positive behavior supports and interventions (PBIS), social-skills training, cognitive-behavioral interventions, self-monitoring, contracting, and the use of outside agencies to support the school in assisting students
Prerequisites: SPED 510/SPED 626.
Restrictions: SPED 510/SPED 626 or consent of instructor.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 632 Assessment and Diagnosis for Students With Exceptionalities

Content: Diagnosis for special education eligibility under state and federal laws and assessment for special education instruction. Special attention is paid to learning disabilities and mental retardation (Intellectual Disabilities). Candidates practice selecting, administering and scoring selected standardized tests; interpreting the scores; and writing reports. Candidates learn about Response to Instruction (RtI), including how to administer Curriculum-Based Measures and how to integrate aspects of a multi-tiered intervention process with standardized assessment tools to create a comprehensive evaluation.
Prerequisites: SPED 510/SPED 626 or consent of advisor.
Corequisites: SPED 545/SPED 645.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SPED 633 Curriculum and Instruction for Students With Exceptionalities

Content: Research-validated curriculum and specially designed instruction for students with disabilities. Based on Common Core State Standards, participants review and adapt general education curricula appropriate to their authorization level to create specially designed instruction that emphasizes and supports progress across academic areas, learning strategies, and appropriate accommodations. This course uses curriculum-based assessment/measurement data to craft effective, substantive, and procedurally correct individualized education plans (IEPs) and specially designed instruction aligned with the Common Core State Standards. Additionally, candidates will demonstrate all skills necessary to facilitate an IEP meeting, including group dynamics and conflict resolution strategies.
Prerequisites: SPED 513/SPED 632.
Corequisites: SPED546/SPED 646.
Restrictions: SPED 513/SPED 632 or consent of advisor.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SPED 635 Current Issues in Special Education

Content: Provides an integrated summary of current content, pedagogy, learning, and legal issues that have direct impact on the practice of special education in k-12 public schools. The faculty and endorsement candidates jointly select topics for additional emphasis based on participants' backgrounds and cumulative experiences in the Special Education: Generalist Endorsement program. Focus is on application of all components of special education standards in Oregon.
Prerequisites: Completion of all coursework for the Special Education: Generalist Endorsement or consent of program director.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPED 644 Practicum

Content: Designed to provide each participant with observation and feedback concerning essential skills associated with the Special Education: Generalist Endorsement. Classroom observations are collaboratively scheduled by the participant and the practicum supervisor with pre- and post-observation conferences built into each site visit. Participants document time spent modifying curriculum and instruction for students assigned individual education plans (IEPs).
Prerequisites: SPED 510 or SPED 626, and SPED 513 or SPED 632.
Corequisites: SPED 514 or SPED 633.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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SPED 645 Practicum I

Content: Public-school-based field experience provides each participant with observation and feedback concerning the application of essential skills, which are required to meet the Oregon special education standards associated with the Special Education: Generalist Endorsement. Observations are collaboratively scheduled by the endorsement candidate and practicum supervisor with pre- and post-observation analysis. Participants are required to document time spent providing all aspects of the special education process with the emphasis on assessment and progress monitoring.
Prerequisites: SPED 510 or SPED 626.
Corequisites: SPED 513 or SPED 632.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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SPED 646 Practicum II

Content: Clinical field experience to provide each candidate with observation and feedback concerning essential skills required by the special education standards associated with the Special Education: Generalist Endorsement. Observations are collaboratively scheduled by the participant and practicum supervisor with pre- and post-observation analysis. Observations in Practicum I (SPED-545) have provided formative assessment of a candidate's demonstrated knowledge, skills, and dispositions related to special education practice. This course provides summative assessment of the candidate. Candidates document time spent providing all aspects of the special education process with emphasis on progress monitoring, individual education plans (IEPs) and specially designed instruction (SDI).
Prerequisites: SPED 510 or SPED 626 and SPED 545 or SPED 645.
Corequisites: SPED 514 or SPED 633.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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SPED 689 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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SPED 698 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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SPED 699 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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SPED 989 Professional Studies: International Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.