Graduate Catalog

School Counseling

Ensuring academic, career, personal, and social success for all students defines the school counselor's role in the school and community. Lewis & Clark's School Counseling programs prepare well-qualified school counselors who will deliver comprehensive school counseling services based on national standards in these areas of development. Candidates come to perceive education as a community endeavor requiring the best collaborative efforts of students, educators, families, and community members. Program participants develop close relationships with practitioners and faculty in small class settings while learning how to promote this collaboration through leadership and advocacy.

Lewis & Clark's innovative school counseling program offers both a master's degree with licensure option and a licensure-only option for those interested in becoming school counselors. Candidates begin working in schools during their first semester of coursework. This on-site involvement continues throughout the program and emphasizes a commitment to diversity and social justice issues and to the use of data, assessment, and technology.

The program continually reviews and improves course offerings to reflect changing expectations at the local, state, and national levels while maintaining academic and philosophical integrity.

The program:
  • Provides a high-quality academic experience that develops knowledge and skills and reflects school counseling in the 21st century.
  • Provides professional support and assistance for all candidates to meet Oregon state requirements for licensure.
  • Focuses on the individual needs of candidates, their students, their schools, and their communities.
  • Provides opportunities to work collaboratively with families, volunteers, colleagues, and community members in applying course content to actual work situations, beginning during the first semester of coursework.
  • Promotes success for all participants through continued formal and informal feedback and evaluations.
  • Provides an arena for multiple professional growth opportunities.
Candidates are prepared to:
  • Develop advocacy, leadership, and collaboration skills through a comprehensive and challenging curriculum.
  • Understand culturally diverse populations and issues of social justice and equity through field placements and hands-on work.
  • Explore and foster collaborative efforts between schools and communities.
  • Be critical thinkers, lifelong learners, and visionaries for their schools and communities.
  • Analyze, synthesize, and evaluate a broad and comprehensive knowledge base of best practices in school settings, particularly those that apply to ensuring equity for all students.
Accreditation

The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) have approved Lewis & Clark's licensure programs in school counseling.

Licensure

Graduates who complete the program and the state-required tests are also eligible to be recommended by Lewis & Clark to the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission for the appropriate license. Applicants from Oregon approved programs must apply for licensure within three years following completion of their respective programs. If more than three years elapse before application is made, the candidate must qualify for recommendation under rules for licensure in effect at the time of application.

Ongoing Candidate Evaluation

Candidates for all school counseling programs are evaluated each semester by course professors. Evaluation criteria include successful completion of courses (e.g., timeliness of work, cooperation with peers, quality of academic work) and performance rubrics developed according to the performance objectives approved by the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (instructors address these in class). Candidates must begin a professional portfolio during the first semester of coursework. The portfolio includes documentation of the following:

  • All completed coursework/projects (e.g., an evaluation summary for each course)
  • Micro-internships (e.g., academic development and consultation internships)
  • Professional organizational membership beginning in the first semester of coursework
  • Completion of all prerequisite coursework prior to the final internship
  • Completion of all courses (i.e., no outstanding incomplete grades prior to the final internship)
  • Applicable coursework in the development of a comprehensive school counseling program plan.

Master of Education in School Counseling with Preliminary License

Track I

Candidates who hold a valid teaching license or certificate and who have two academic years of experience as a full-time licensed teacher in a public education setting or in a regionally accredited private school in any state or other U.S. jurisdiction are eligible for the Track I program in school counseling.

Degree Requirements for Track I

Candidates must complete 42 semester hours, distributed as follows, and all required tests:

Required Courses for Track I
SCED 500Introduction to School Counseling3
SCED 501Academic Development and Consultation2
SCED 502Internship: Academic Development and Consultation1.5
SCED 503Career Development and Consultation2
SCED 505Personal/Social Development and Consultation2
SCED 506Internship: Personal/Social Development and Consultation1.5
SCED 507Development of the Learner: Children and Adolescents2
SCED 508Social Justice, Diversity, and Cultural Issues2
SCED 509Ethical and Legal Issues in Education and School Counseling3
SCED 510Family Dynamics, Community Resources, and Consultation3
SCED 511Group Leadership Skills for School Counselors2
SCED 512Special-Needs Populations in Schools2
SCED 513Educational Research, Assessment, and Technology3
SCED 516School Counseling Internship (two semesters, 4 semester hours each)8
Elective Courses

Any remaining semester hours may be earned by taking elective courses.

Graduate Convocation Requirement

Students must attend Convocation (CORE 500) .

Track II

Candidates who do not hold a valid regular teaching license—or who do hold such a license but have less than two academic years of teaching experience in a public education setting or in a regionally accredited private school in any state or other U.S. jurisdiction—are eligible for the Track II program in school counseling.

Degree Requirements for Track II

Candidates must complete 45 semester hours, distributed as follows, and all required tests:

Required Courses for Track II

All of the required courses for Track I, 37 semester hours (see above), plus

SCED 517Practicum in Classroom Instruction5
Elective Courses

Any remaining semester hours may be earned by taking elective courses.

Graduate Convocation Requirement

Students must attend Convocation (CORE 500).

Track IIb

Candidates who do not hold a valid regular teaching license or who do hold such a license but have less than two academic years of teaching experience in a public education setting or in a regionally accredited private school in any state or other U.S. jurisdiction, but who have previously fulfilled the teaching practicum requirements of the school counseling program may be eligible for the Track IIb program in school counseling. In order to qualify for the Track IIb Program, students must have completed 200 hours of classroom placement in a school, a graded work sample, a minimum of four evaluations of placement performance, successful completion of a student teacher support course of at least five credits, and must be eligible for the Preliminary Teaching License. The course requirements for Track IIb candidates are exactly the same as the requirements for Track I.

Degree Requirements for Track IIb

Candidates must complete 42 semester hours, distributed as follows, and all required tests:

Required Courses for Track IIb

All of the required courses for Track I, 37 semester hours (see above)

Elective Courses

Any remaining semester hours may be earned by taking elective courses.

Graduate Convocation Requirement

Students must attend Convocation (CORE 500).

Preliminary School Counselor License-Only

Candidates who hold a master's degree in a closely related field (e.g., education, psychology, or social work) may apply for admission to the Preliminary School Counselor License-Only Program. Students are held accountable to each course in the program as outlined below. After admission, the candidate works closely with a faculty advisor to design an individual program of study that fulfills the licensure requirements set out by Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission. The program of study is created from review of petitions submitted by the candidate to waive coursework based on competence equivalency or examination (restricted to certain courses). Contact the school counseling office for further information.

Track I

Candidates who hold a valid regular teaching certificate or license and who have two academic years of experience as a full-time teacher in a public education setting or in a regionally accredited private school in any state or other U.S. jurisdiction are eligible for the Track I Program in school counseling.

Licensure Requirements for Track I

Candidates must complete 37 semester hours, distributed as follows, and all required tests:

Required Courses for Track I
SCED 500Introduction to School Counseling3
SCED 501Academic Development and Consultation2
SCED 502Internship: Academic Development and Consultation1.5
SCED 503Career Development and Consultation2
SCED 505Personal/Social Development and Consultation2
SCED 506Internship: Personal/Social Development and Consultation1.5
SCED 507Development of the Learner: Children and Adolescents2
SCED 508Social Justice, Diversity, and Cultural Issues2
SCED 509Ethical and Legal Issues in Education and School Counseling3
SCED 510Family Dynamics, Community Resources, and Consultation3
SCED 511Group Leadership Skills for School Counselors2
SCED 512Special-Needs Populations in Schools2
SCED 513Educational Research, Assessment, and Technology3
SCED 516School Counseling Internship (two semesters, 4 semester hours each)8

Track II

Candidates who do not hold a valid regular teaching license—or who do hold such a license but have less than two academic years of teaching experience in a public education setting or in a regionally accredited private school in any state or other U.S. jurisdiction—are eligible for the Track II Program in school counseling.

Licensure Requirements for Track II

Candidates must complete 42 semester hours, distributed as follows, and all required tests:

Required Courses for Track II

All of the required courses for Track I, 37 semester hours, plus:

SCED 517Practicum in Classroom Instruction (3 semester hours fall, 2 semester hours spring)5

Track IIb

Candidates who do not hold a valid regular teaching license or who do hold such a license but have less than two academic years of teaching experience in a public education setting or in a regionally accredited private school in any state or other U.S. jurisdiction, but who have previously fulfilled the teaching practicum requirements of the school counseling program may be eligible for the Track IIb Program in school counseling. In order to qualify for the Track IIb Program, students must have completed 200 hours of classroom placement in a school, a graded work sample, a minimum of four evaluations of placement performance, successful completion of a student teacher support course of at least five credits, and must be eligible for the Preliminary Teaching License. The course requirements for Track IIb candidates are exactly the same as the requirements for Track I.

Licensure Requirements for Track IIb

Candidates must complete the 37 semester hours required for Track I (see above) and all required tests.

Becoming an Oregon Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC)

While Oregon law does not require that counselors and therapists be licensed, clients may be assured that “those holding an Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) or Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy (LMFT) credential issued by the Oregon Board of Licensed Professional Counselors and Therapists (OBLPCT) have met the standards identified by the State of Oregon to ensure competent service.” OBLPCT, which is in charge of issuing counseling licenses, verifies that the “licensee holds a graduate degree from a recognized school, has completed appropriate courses and training, has completed supervised experience, and has passed an examination to identify a minimum standard of knowledge. In addition, licensees are held accountable to the state. State law and the licensing board's Code of Ethics require that conduct meets acceptable standards, and all licensees must provide clients with a professional disclosure statement explaining their approach, credentials, and client rights. Licensure is often used by insurance companies to determine eligibility for payment or reimbursement for mental health care services.”

Lewis & Clark School Counseling program graduates interested in receiving an Oregon LPC issued through the OBLPCT can obtain recommendation for the LPC in differing ways depending on their degree date.

School Counseling program candidates who graduated in 2000 and earlier can submit their OBLPCT or out-of-state paperwork to the Professional Mental Health Counseling program director for completion. Starting in 2001, the School Counseling program did not include LPC requirements. Candidates who graduated from the Lewis & Clark School Counseling program in 2001 and after need to be admitted to and complete an OBLPCT-approved program leading to an LPC in order to obtain licensure recommendation. Candidates can contact the Counseling Psychology department for information on completing an OBLPCT-approved program leading to the LPC.

Testing Requirements

The following tests must be passed in order to be eligible for a recommendation by Lewis & Clark for school counseling licensure in any state. Detailed information regarding the point in the program by which each test must be passed is available in the program handbook. The required tests are:

  1. ORELA: Protecting Student and Civil Rights in the Educational Environment Exam
  2. NES: School Counselor Test

Students may view completed tests, including scores, by logging into their WebAdvisor account.

Students who hold a current Oregon Basic, Standard, Initial, Continuing, Preliminary, Professional, or Teacher Leader teacher or personnel services license may waive the ORELA: Protecting Student and Civil Rights in the Educational Environment test.

School Counseling Courses

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SCED 500 Introduction to School Counseling

Content: Perspectives and practices for school counseling in the 21st century, multicultural and diversity issues impacting school counseling, and overview of counseling theory as applied to the child and adolescent in a school setting. Introduction to counseling skill development with an emphasis on solution-focused, cognitive-behavioral, and microskills approaches.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SCED 501 Academic Development and Consultation

Content: First of three courses addressing national standards for comprehensive school counseling programs and the role of the school counselor in consultation. Skill development with an emphasis on resiliency/asset-building using solution-focused, cognitive-behavioral, client-centered, reality/choice, and microskills counseling as applied to the academic development of a diverse population of students to eliminate achievement gaps. Topics include developmental assets as identified by the Search Institute. Participants practice consultation skills with students and faculty.
Prerequisites: None.
Corequisites: SCED 500, SCED 502.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SCED 502 Internship: Academic Development and Consultation

Content: Direct experience in school settings working with students and faculty. Candidates conduct classroom activities to support academic success based on the national standards for academic competencies. Under the direction of the school counselor, participants consult with students and faculty on academic issues and the elimination of achievement gaps between and ethnic and racial groups.
Prerequisites: None.
Corequisites: SCED 500, SCED 501.
Credits: 1.5 semester hours.

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SCED 503 Career Development and Consultation

Content: Second of three courses addressing National Standards for Comprehensive School Counseling Programs and the role of the school counselor in consultation. Continued skill development with an emphasis on resiliency/asset-building using solution-focused, cognitive-behavioral, client-centered, reality/choice, and microskills counseling as applied to the career development of a diverse population of students. Topics include developmental assets as identified by the Search Institute. Content knowledge is enhanced by technology. Participants practice consultation skills with students and faculty.
Prerequisites: SCED 500.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SCED 505 Personal/Social Development and Consultation

Content: Third of three courses addressing National Standards for Comprehensive School Counseling Programs and the role of the school counselor in consultation. Continued skill development with an emphasis on resiliency/asset-building using solution-focused, cognitive-behavioral, client-centered, reality/choice, and microskills counseling as applied to the personal/social development of a diverse population of students. Topics include developmental assets as identified by the Search Institute. Participants practice consultation skills with students and faculty.
Prerequisites: SCED 500, SCED 501, SCED 502.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SCED 506 Internship: Personal/Social Development and Consultation

Content: Direct experience in school settings working with students and faculty. Candidates conduct classroom activities to support personal/social success based on national standards for personal/social competencies. Under the direction of the school counselor, participants consult with students and faculty on personal/social issues.
Prerequisites: SCED 500, SCED 501, SCED 502.
Corequisites: SCED 505.
Credits: 1.5 semester hours.

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SCED 507 Development of the Learner: Children and Adolescents

Content: Discussion, critique, and application of theories of child and adolescent development and learning. Application of theory to the school setting in the areas of learner development, learner styles/differences, the nature of the learner, and learner motivation. Topics include the impact of culture and diversity on learning. Examines from the perspective of the school counselor the contribution of internal/external asset developments that help today's youths thrive.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SCED 508 Social Justice, Diversity, and Cultural Issues

Content: Strategies for interacting and working with diverse communities as identified by race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexual orientation, age, disability, or religion. Addresses methods for positively impacting social and cultural diversity and equity issues including the possible effects of culture, race stereotyping, family, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual identity, language, and values on student development and progress in the school setting. Content and methodology emphasize small-group activities, collaboration, and use of data to create equity for all students. Candidates practice taking an active role in supporting all students and focus on eliminating the achievement gap.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SCED 509 Ethical and Legal Issues in Education and School Counseling

Content: Study of sources of law under which educators operate. Case law, lectures, and discussions concentrate on legal rights and responsibilities of all individuals attending or employed by public schools. Examination of areas of educational governance (e.g., courses of law and the courts, schools, and the states). Explores the ethical codes of the American School Counselor Association and the American Counseling Association using case studies. Meets the requirement of the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission for knowledge of federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SCED 510 Family Dynamics, Community Resources, and Consultation

Content: Effective ways to include family members as active contributors in their children's education. Examines concepts of family dynamics and dysfunction requiring referral and use of community resources. Topics include developmental assets as applicable to the family setting and impact of the special-needs child on the family organizational structure. Explores diversity inherent in families and focuses on ways of relating to families who differ from each other in terms of age, race, socioeconomic background, and/or family form.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SCED 511 Group Leadership Skills for School Counselors

Content: Principles and practices of group counseling, group dynamics, group leadership, and group processes with students and parents. Topics include group approaches for promoting academic, career, and personal/social success for all students. Candidates plan, organize, facilitate, and evaluate small groups within the educational setting. Addresses ethical considerations of group work with children and adolescents using the ethical codes of the American School Counselor Association and the American Counseling Association.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SCED 512 Special-Needs Populations in Schools

Content: Overview of the special-needs child in today's schools and the knowledge and skills necessary to better advocate on behalf of this student. Topics include exceptionalities including communication disorders, learning disabilities, mental retardation, emotional disturbance, behavioral disorders, orthopedic impairments, traumatic brain injuries, hearing and vision impairments, and special talents and giftedness. Participants review criteria for special-needs populations as outlined in the Oregon Administrative Rules.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SCED 513 Educational Research, Assessment, and Technology

Content: The major uses and components of classroom or school-based research processes, academic test interpretation, and limitations. Participants explore quantitative and qualitative research methods, critiques of research studies, assessment and evaluation, integration of assessment with instruction, portfolios, comprehensive school counseling programs, and what it means to be a practitioner-researcher. Topics include cultural assumptions held by researchers and the effects of these assumptions on research practices and results. Candidates develop a database, PowerPoint presentation, and webpage for data display.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Restricted to students who are eligible for SCED 516 School Counseling Internship (Macro).
Credits: 1-3 semester hours.

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SCED 516 School Counseling Internship

Content: Application of knowledge, skills, and attitudes gained from previous courses (e.g., consultation, research, ethics/law). Candidates focus on the school counselor's role within the educational setting and prepare a professional portfolio that showcases their graduate work/experiences. Candidates assess, design, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive school counseling program based on national standards, the ASCA National Model, and Oregon's Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Framework. Explores school reform initiatives (e.g., Certificate of Initial Mastery, Certificate of Advanced Mastery, Proficiency-Based Admissions Standards), including curriculum, instruction, leadership, and politics. Students take 4 semester hours in fall and 4 in spring for a total of 8 semester hours.
Prerequisites: Completion of all required coursework.
Restrictions: Portfolio meeting and sign-off with advisor.
Credits: 4 semester hours.

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SCED 517 Practicum in Classroom Instruction

Content: Foundations of education and curriculum. Classroom instruction is complemented by a teaching practicum, allowing the candidate to integrate theory and practice. Participants complete student teaching and prepare a work sample. Students take three semester hours in fall and two in spring, for a total of five semester hours.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2-3 semester hours.

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SCED 544 Practicum

Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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SCED 550 Clinical Issues in School Counseling

Content: This course will address various clinical issues frequently encountered by school counselors in a K-12 setting. Conducted as a seminar, the course is an overview primer of mental health issues affecting children and adolescents (for example, depression, anxiety, self mutilating behavior, behavioral disorders, PTSD). Clinical issues will be discussed in terms of etiological factors, symptomotology, biopsychosocial factors, treatment issues, and cultural and diversity perspectives. The use and limitations of the DSM-5 diagnostic system will be addressed. The school counselor's role in referral and long term treatment for clinical issues will be addressed in the context of the ASCA National Model.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to the School Counseling program or instructor consent.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SCED 565 College Planning to Promote Equity and Access for All Students

Content: This course will introduce school counselors to issues and strategies relating to the college counseling needs of high school students and their families. In addition, techniques for infusing college-going beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors in all schools (K-12) will be examined. Participants will develop educationally appropriate perspectives and useful techniques for maximizing education opportunities for all students.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Admission to the School Counseling program or instructor consent.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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SCED 589 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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SCED 598 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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SCED 599 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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SCED 689 Professional Studies: Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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SCED 698 Special Studies: New or Experimental Courses

Content: In-depth study of a special topic offered by the graduate school for the first time or on a temporary basis.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.

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SCED 699 Independent Study

Content: Independent Study enables a student to pursue, in collaboration with a faculty member, an academic course not currently offered. To receive credit for independent study, the student consults with the faculty member before registration to define the course content, title, amount of credit, and academic evaluation. As a general rule, a graduate student may apply no more than three courses of independent study toward a graduate degree or licensure.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Restrictions: Consent of instructor and submission of application for Independent Study to academic department office.
Credits: 1-5 semester hours.

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SCED 989 Professional Studies: International Special Topics

Content: In-depth examination of topics relevant to practicing professionals. Course content is based upon recent research and directly informs practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.