School Psychology

School psychologists work in deeply engaged and collaborative ways with students, teachers, families, administrators, and other professionals to address the social, emotional, and learning needs of children in schools. School psychologists possess not only an in-depth understanding of children, families, and schools, but also a highly-developed set of relational and communication skills. In this way, school psychologists are able to see and understand children in rich and comprehensive ways (through observation, consultation, data collection, and assessment) and share those understandings in helpful ways with parents, teachers, and other school personnel. The primary goal of school psychologists is to help children flourish in schools, at home, and in life.

In our nationally-approved school psychology program, we emphasize the development of this deep understanding of children, families, and schools as well as the development of these effective relational and communication skills. Through coursework and practica in counseling, consultation, assessment, and intervention, our students learn to work effectively with individual children, whole families, special education teams, as well as whole school communities to help create learning environments that foster the healthy development of all children.

Accreditation and Licensure

Lewis & Clark's School Psychology program is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) and has also been approved by the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Graduates of the School Psychology program earn the Educational Specialist degree (Ed.S.) and are eligible to apply to NASP for the National Certificate of School Psychology (NCSP). Holders of the NCSP may be eligible for an abbreviated process as they apply for out-of-state school psychology licenses. Graduates who complete the program and the state-required test are also eligible to be recommended by Lewis & Clark to the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission for an Initial School Psychology License.

Educational Specialist in School Psychology

The Educational Specialist degree program is designed for students seeking initial licensure as school psychologists. The Ed.S. degree demands a level of preparation significantly greater than that called for by a master's degree. The Ed.S. is widely regarded as the intermediary degree between a master's and a doctoral degree. Completion of our program requires a minimum of three years (including coursework in fall, spring, and summer semesters), with a second-year practicum, and a third-year, full-time internship in a public school setting.

Degree Requirements

A minimum of 60 semester hours, distributed as follows, and all required tests:

Required Courses
SPSY 502Introduction to School Psychology I2
CPSY 506Life Span Development2
CPSY 530Research Methods and Statistics I3
CPSY 551Introduction to Expressive Arts Therapy1
SPSY 503Introduction to School Psychology II2
CPSY 514Group Counseling With Children and Adolescents3
CPSY 531Research Methods and Statistics II3
SPSY 510Ethical and Legal Issues for School Psychology Practicum2
CPSY 523Counseling and Interventions With Children and Adolescents3
SPSY 517The Exceptional Child in Schools3
SPSY 541Assessment and Intervention I3
SPSY 542Assessment and Intervention II3
SPSY 573School-Based Consultation3
SPSY 580Practicum in School Psychology (3 semester hours in fall, 3 in spring, 1 in summer)7
SPSY 543Assessment and Intervention III3
SPSY 574Advanced Consultation and Program Evaluation2
CPSY 504Family Therapy: Theory and Practice3
SPSY 571Prevention in Educational Settings3
SPSY 582Internship in School Psychology (4 semester hours in fall, 3 in spring)7
Elective Courses

Students choose two hours of elective credit from any program in the graduate school.

Graduate Core Requirement

Students must complete three Core Units. One Core Unit is fulfilled by attending the Graduate School’s annual Convocation. Core experiences that fulfill the additional two-unit requirement are described on the Core website.

Licensure and Certification

Once the Ed.S. degree is awarded and the required tests are passed, graduates are recommended to the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission for the Initial School Psychology License. Graduates also have the option of applying to the National Association of School Psychologists for the National Certificate of School Psychology (NCSP). Holders of the NCSP may be eligible for an abbreviated process as they apply for out-of-state school psychology licenses.

Initial License Only in School Psychology

Note: No applications for the licensure-only program will be accepted through 2015.

Students with a master's, specialist's, or doctoral degree in counseling, psychology, special education, or a related field may qualify for admission into the Initial License-Only program. Students in the licensure program who are not seeking a master's or specialist's degree may petition to waive required coursework based on competence, experience, and/or equivalent graduate credits from other institutions. Upon admission, transcripts of previous graduate work and supporting documentation are evaluated by a faculty committee to determine which courses will be waived and to develop an individualized program plan for licensure as a school psychologist.

Licensure Requirements

A minimum of 15 semester hours of coursework, including SPSY 582 Internship in School Psychology, and all required tests.

Licensure and Certification

Once the coursework and the required tests are passed, graduates are recommended to the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission for the Initial School Psychology License. Depending on their previous graduate degrees, students may also have the option of applying to the National Association of School Psychologists for the National Certificate of School Psychology (NCSP). Holders of the NCSP may be eligible for an abbreviated process as they apply for out-of-state school psychology licenses.

Practicum and Internship Information

Each school psychology student will complete a practicum in a public school setting during his or her second year in the program. The practicum, which runs from September to June, generally requires eight to 10 on-site hours per week as well as additional coursework. Students will be provided assistance in locating a practicum site and a list of schools at which previous students have completed practica. Students may also find their own sites, subject to approval.

During their third year in the program, school psychology students complete a full-time internship that runs the entire school year (August-June). It is designed as an opportunity to develop autonomous skills in direct services such as assessment, counseling, and consultation. The internship requires 1,200 hours of supervised service in a public school setting at the elementary and secondary levels. Some school districts provide a stipend for this work. On-campus group supervision is provided as well. In preparation for this internship, students apply during their second year to districts that have requested interns through the program and supervisors are approved by program faculty.

Additional program information can be found in School Psychology Program Handbooks.

Testing Requirements

The following tests must be passed in order to be eligible for a recommendation by Lewis & Clark for school psychology licensure in any state. Detailed information regarding the point in the program by which each test must be passed is available in the program handbook. The required tests are:

  1. Basic Skills Test,* required for program admission, including reading, writing, and mathematics
  2. ORELA: Protecting Student and Civil Rights in the Educational Environment Exam
  3. PRAXIS II: School Psychology Test

Students may view completed tests, including scores, by logging into their WebAdvisor account.

*

Students who hold a master's degree or higher prior to admission may waive the basic skills test requirement.

Students who hold a current Oregon Basic, Standard, Initial, or Continuing teacher or personnel services license may waive the basic skills test and the ORELA: Protecting Student and Civil Rights in the Educational Environment test.

These scores must be on file in the Counseling Psychology department office prior to program completion.

School Psychology Courses

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CPSY 504 Family Therapy: Theory and Practice

Content: Overview of the fundamental assumptions and ideas of general systems theory and the basic premises of theoretical orientations within family therapy. Participants explore the application of course material to their work setting or training track.
Prerequisites: For students in the Professional Mental Health Community Counseling or Professional Mental Health Counseling-Addictions programs, MHCA 502 or MHC 503, CPSY 506, MHC 509 or MHCA 511, MHC 513, MHC 511 or CPSY 550, CPSY 530 or MHC 535. For students in other programs, none.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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CPSY 506 Life Span Development

Content: Exploration of life span development through the lenses of social, cultural, cognitive, biological, and learning theories and research. Emphasis is on gaining better conceptual understanding of healthy development and better practical understanding of how to help children, adolescents, and adults address the developmental challenges they face across the life span. Particular focus placed on understanding our own developmental processes as well as the role of cultural difference and commonality in the developmental process.
Prerequisites: For Professional Mental Health Counseling and Professional Mental Health Counseling--Addictions students, MHCA 502 or MHC 503, MHC 513.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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CPSY 514 Group Counseling With Children and Adolescents

Content: Instruction and practice in developing group treatments for children and adolescents in clinical and school settings. Students gain practice as group leaders in addressing issues related to group dynamics, cultural diversity, potential problems encountered when running groups, and generalization and maintenance of behavioral change. Students also gain experience constructing curricula for specific issues such as divorce, substance use, grief, and social skills.
Prerequisites: For students in the Professional Mental Health Counseling or Professional Mental Health Counseling-Addictions programs, MHCA 502 or MHC 503, CPSY 506, MHC 509 or MHCA 511, MHC 513, CPSY 522, CPSY 530 or MHC 535, MHC 534, MHC 511 or CPSY 550. For students in Marriage, Couple, and Family Therapy programs, CPSY 504, CPSY 506, MCFT 526; for students in the School Psychology program, SPSY 502.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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CPSY 523 Counseling and Interventions With Children and Adolescents

Content: Mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders of childhood and adolescents. Topics include identification, diagnosis, and planning of multifaceted counseling intervention and treatment strategies; developmental, social, and cultural influences on diagnoses and interventions; ecological and social-justice-oriented conceptualization and intervention across systems.
Prerequisites: For Professional Mental Health Counseling and Professional Mental Health Counseling--Addictions students, MHCA 502 or MHC 503, CPSY 506, MHC 509 or MHCA 511, MHC 513, CPSY 522, CPSY 530 or MHC 535, MHC 534 or CPSY 504, MHC 511 or CPSY 550. For Marriage, Couple, and Family Therapy students, CPSY 504, CPSY 506, MCFT 526. For School Psychology students, SPSY 502.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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CPSY 530 Research Methods and Statistics I

Content: Introduction to research methods with an emphasis on design, sampling, measurement issues, and introductory data analysis. Topics include (1) research design: elements of the research process, types of designs, program evaluation; (2) ethical considerations of research: informed consent, research with diverse and vulnerable populations, research with children, human subjects review; (3) basic measurement concepts: validity, reliability, norms, score interpretation; (4) basic statistical concepts: frequency distributions, central tendency, measures of variability, correlation. Reviews Web-based resources for conducting research. Note: Taught during the fall semester only, as the first course of a two-semester sequence. Students who wish to pursue the thesis-option M.S. program are advised to take this sequence as early as possible in their course of study.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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CPSY 531 Research Methods and Statistics II

Content: Research design and data analysis, inferential statistics. Simple and complex designs, normal distribution, z-test, t-test, analysis of variance, statistical power, simple regression. Overview of nonparametric and multivariate analysis. Note: Taught in spring semester only, as the second course of a two-semester sequence. Students who wish to pursue the thesis-option M.S. program are advised to take this sequence as early as possible in their course of study.
Prerequisites: CPSY-530.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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CPSY 551 Introduction to Expressive Arts Therapy

Content: This class is designed for mental health practitioners interested in gaining an introductory understanding of the theory and practice of using expressive arts in therapy and counseling. Students explore the mediating properties of expressive arts as applied to clinical and school settings with children, adolescents, and adults.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1 semester hour.

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SPSY 502 Introduction to School Psychology I

Content: Overview of the history, systems, roles, and functions of school psychologists. Readings in contemporary issues and historical events provide the foundation for graduate preparation in school psychology. Students observe the work of school psychologists and discuss the profession in a seminar format. This course is a practicum in school-based systems, and includes overviews of the theories and practices for school-based emotional, behavioral, social, and academic change.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPSY 503 Introduction to School Psychology II

Content: Overview of the history, systems, roles, and functions of school psychologists. Readings in contemporary issues and historical events provide the foundation for graduate preparation in school psychology. Students observe the work of school psychologists and discuss the profession in a seminar format. Practicum in school-based systems. This course is a practicum in school-based systems, and includes overviews of the theories and practices for school-based emotional, behavioral, social, and academic change.
Prerequisites: SPSY 502.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPSY 510 Ethical and Legal Issues for School Psychology Practicum

Content: Consideration of the applicable ethical and legal issues for school psychologists in mental health and school settings. Students develop skills in counseling, consultation, assessment, and intervention planning.
Prerequisites: CPSY 506, SPSY 502, SPSY 503.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPSY 517 The Exceptional Child in Schools

Content: Overview of the exceptional child in today's educational setting. Provides a basic understanding of special educational law and public policy related to the birth-to-three early intervention, preschool, K-12, and vocational transitioning populations. Exceptionalities studied include communication disorders, learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities, emotional disturbance, behavioral disorders, orthopedic impairments, other health impairments, traumatic brain injuries, hearing and vision impairments, and giftedness. Students gain an understanding of the criteria requirements for each category as outlined under the Oregon Administrative Rules and some of the unique evaluation considerations for each.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SPSY 541 Assessment and Intervention I

Content: This course is the first of a three-part assessment sequence that addresses psycho-educational, social, emotional, and behavioral assessment of children and adolescents from birth through age 21. In this course, the focus is on gaining competency with the skills and tools needed to collect, interpret, and present data using observation, interviews, behavior rating scales, functional behavioral assessments, response to intervention, and assessments for children with pervasive developmental disabilities.
Prerequisites: CPSY 530, CPSY 531.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SPSY 542 Assessment and Intervention II

Content: The second of a three-part assessment sequence that addresses psycho-educational, social, emotional, and behavioral assessment of children and adolescents from birth through age 21. In this course, the focus is on gaining competency with the skills and tools needed to collect, interpret and present data using psycho-educational assessments involving cognitive, academic, and adaptive measures.
Prerequisites: SPSY 541 or consent of instructor.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SPSY 543 Assessment and Intervention III

Content: This course is the third of a three-part assessment sequence that addresses psycho-educational, social, emotional, and behavioral assessment of children and adolescents from birth through age 21. In this course, the focus is on gaining competency with the skills and tools required to interpret and integrate multiple assessment measures, including reporting and consulting on such assessment data in written and verbal formats.
Prerequisites: SPSY 542 or consent of instructor.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SPSY 571 Prevention in Educational Settings

Content: Theory, application, design, implementation, and evaluation of prevention and intervention programs for school-age youth in school and community settings. Students also examine the cultural, social, psychological, family, and political factors bearing on children's understanding of and experiences with alcohol and other drugs. Prevention and intervention through enhancement of social competence are presented from constructivist and ecological-developmental perspectives with application to individuals and to small-group and classroom-based settings.
Prerequisites: SPSY 580.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SPSY 573 School-Based Consultation

Content: Theory and practice of consultation, which is fundamental to the delivery of mental health services in schools. Covers models of behavioral and instructional consultation in schools and with families. In-school observations facilitate students' understanding of consultation in schools. Emphasis is on identifying ways to collaboratively assess and intervene in problematic behavioral and instructional situations. Addresses issues of cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic differences.
Prerequisites: SPSY 503.
Credits: 3 semester hours.

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SPSY 574 Advanced Consultation and Program Evaluation

Content: Application of consultation in schools and other social service delivery systems. Topics include theoretical and practical considerations for the use of mental health consultation, advocacy consultation, process consultation, organization development, and other approaches. Explores the application of ethical principles to consultation practice including careful consideration of issues of cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic diversity. Students develop strong consultation skills grounded in well-articulated theory.
Prerequisites: SPSY-573 or consent of instructor.
Credits: 2 semester hours.

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SPSY 580 Practicum in School Psychology

Content: Didactic class instruction, practicum placement, and clinical training related to work as a professional school psychologist. Covers the application of psychological therapies with children, adolescents, and families in educational settings, as well as skills involved in collecting data for consultation and assessment at the practicum site. Foci will include the development and application of diversity awareness and knowledge including systems of power and privilege; awareness of one's own beliefs, biases, and prejudices; and methods/skills for working with those who are diverse in culture, race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, or physical or mental ability. In weekly seminars, students review research, theory, and practice. Students also present audio and/or video recordings of their counseling for supervisory review.
Prerequisites: SPSY 510.
Credits: 1-3 semester hours.

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SPSY 582 Internship in School Psychology

Content: Supervised experience as a school psychologist. Direct weekly supervision is provided by a field-based licensed school psychologist and indirect supervision by the course instructor. Interns provide school psychology services in consultation, counseling, assessment, intervention development, and program evaluation with K-12 students in special and regular educational settings. Regular seminar meetings allow for group supervision and the examination of legal, ethical, and professional issues. A comprehensive examination of school psychology is included.
Prerequisites: None.
Credits: 1-4 semester hours.